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Free eBook Wives and Mothers, School Mistresses and Scullery Maids: Working Women in Upper Canada, 1790-1840 download

by Elizabeth Jane Errington

Free eBook Wives and Mothers, School Mistresses and Scullery Maids: Working Women in Upper Canada, 1790-1840 download ISBN: 0773513094
Author: Elizabeth Jane Errington
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press (September 11, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 400
Category: Work and perfomance
Subcategory: Economics
Size MP3: 1144 mb
Size FLAC: 1636 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lrf mbr lrf lit


Errington, Jane, 1951-. Books contributed by the Staff of Internet Archive Canada.

Errington, Jane, 1951-. Montreal ; Buffalo : McGill-Queen's University Press.

Most of them not only experienced the uncertainties of marriage and the potential dangers of childbirth but also took part in making sure that the needs of their families were met. How women actually fulfilled their numerous responsibilities differed, however

Elizabeth jane errington. PART I Around the Domestic Hearth : Wives and Mothers and Reproduction in Upper Canada.

Elizabeth jane errington. There is a holiness about the fireside of a well regulated family, ¹ Anglican cleric John Strachan wrote in 1812.

Considering "women's work" within the social and historical context, Errington shows that the complexity of colonial . A solid overview of the women living in Upper Canada from 1790-1840

A solid overview of the women living in Upper Canada from 1790-1840. Despite limited sources Errington does a good job trying to provide insights into the experiences of all women, not just of the upper classes.

cle{Fingard1997WivesAM, title {Wives and Mothers, Schoolmistresses and Scullery Maids: Working Women in Upper Canada, 1790-1840}, author {Judith Fingard and Elizabeth Jane Errington}, journal {Labour/Le Travail}, year {1997}, volume {39}, pages {286} }. Judith Fingard, Elizabeth Jane Errington.

Elizabeth Jane Errington, Wives and Mothers, School Mistresses and Scullery Maids: Working .

Elizabeth Jane Errington, Wives and Mothers, School Mistresses and Scullery Maids: Working Women in Upper Canada 1790–1840 (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1995), xi. oogle Scholar.

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Working Women in Upper Canada 1790-1840.

Elisabeth Jane Errington. Wives and Mothers School Mistresses and Scullery Maids. Are you sure you want to remove Wives and Mothers School Mistresses and Scullery Maids from your list? Wives and Mothers School Mistresses and Scullery Maids. Working Women in Upper Canada 1790-1840. Published 1995 by McGill-Queen's University Press in Kingston. Social conditions, Women, Employment, History, Protected DAISY, In library.

Jane Errington illustrates how the work they did, particularly as wives and mothers, played a significant role in the development of the colony

Jane Errington illustrates how the work they did, particularly as wives and mothers, played a significant role in the development of the colony. Most of them not only experienced the uncertainties of marriage and the potential dangers of childbirth but also took part in making sure that the needs of their families were met. How women actually fulfilled their numerous responsibilities differed, however.

Author : Elizabeth Jane Errington. Publisher : McGill-Queen's University Press.

Errington explores evidence of a distinctive women's culture and shows that the work women did constituted a common experience shared by Upper Canadian women. Most of them not only experienced the uncertainties of marriage and the potential dangers of childbirth but also took part in making sure that the needs of their families were met. How women actually fulfilled their numerous responsibilities differed, however. Age, location, marital status, class, and society's changing expectations of women all had a direct impact on what was expected of them, what they did, and how they did it. Considering "women's work" within the social and historical context, Errington shows that the complexity of colonial society cannot be understood unless the roles and work of women in Upper Canada are taken into account.