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by Correlli Barnett

Free eBook The audit of war: The illusion  reality of Britain as a great nation download ISBN: 0333353765
Author: Correlli Barnett
Publisher: Macmillan; First Edition edition (1986)
Language: English
Pages: 359
Category: Work and perfomance
Subcategory: Economics
Size MP3: 1630 mb
Size FLAC: 1921 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: mbr docx lrf doc


Corelli Barnett, The Audit of War: The Illusion and Reality of Britain as a Great Nation (London, 1986), esp. chs 8. .

Corelli Barnett, The Audit of War: The Illusion and Reality of Britain as a Great Nation (London, 1986), esp. chs 8 and . oogle Scholar. 4. Harold L. Smith, ‘The effect of the war on the status of women’ in War and Social Change: British Society in the Second World War, (Manchester, 1986), pp. 218–22. Authors and Affiliations. Cite this chapter as: Marwick A. (1988) Conclusion

The second book in The Pride and the Fall sequence on British power in the 20th century, this work places Britain's decline since World War II in a new perspective.

The second book in The Pride and the Fall sequence on British power in the 20th century, this work places Britain's decline since World War II in a new perspective. Based on an analysis of unpublished government records, the text shows that Britain's wartime performance, far from marking a supreme achievement of national genius and effort, was in reality characterized by all the classic symptoms of the British disease.

Barnett, Correlli, The Audit of war: the illusion & reality of Britain as a great nation (London, Macmillan, 1986) Bartlett, . The Special Relationship’ A Political History of Anglo-American Relations since 1945. Longman: New York, 1992. Bayly, Christopher and Tim Harper. Forgotten Armies: The Fall of British Asia, 1941-1945. Bogdanor, Vernon, and Skidelsky, Robert, The age of affluence, 1951-1964 (London, Macmillan, 1970) Cain, . British Imperialism: 1688-2000. London: Longman, 2002.

Corelli Barnett's The Audit of War: The Illusion and Reality of Britain as a Great Nation (London: Macmillan, 1986) was both particularly influential and controversial. The Economic History of Postwar Britain', Twentieth Century British History.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Audit of War: The Illusion and .

Based on an analysis of unpublished government records, this text shows that Britain's wartime performance, far from marking a supreme achievement of national genius and effort, was in reality characterized by all the classic symptoms of the British disease.

The Audit of War book. The Audit of War: The Illusion and Reality of Britain as a Great Nation. by. Correlli Barnett. The second book in The Pride and the Fall sequence on British power in the 20th century, this work places Britain's decline since World War II in a new perspective.

Correlli Barnett described his Audit or War as an 'operational study' to 'uncover the causes of Britain's protracted . If you ever wondered why Great Britain is no longer great - this book and the series it is part of - will explain why.

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The Structural and Ideological Contradictions of Britain's Post-War Reconstruction. 7 See Stevenson, . ‘ Planners' Moon? The Second World War and the planning movement in Britain’, in Smith, H. (e., War and social change (Manchester, 1987), forthcoming. Recommend this journal.

World War, 1939-1945, Industries, Education. some content may be lost due to the binding of the book. New York : Free Press.

Correlli Barnett described his "Audit or War" as an 'operational study' to 'uncover the causes of Britain's protracted decline as an industrial country since the Second World War.' On publication, this book swiftly became one of the most controversial and influential historical works of its time. The author argues that British industry during the Second World War was scandalously inefficient, a situation Barnett blamed on an establishment more concerned with welfare than with industry, technology or the capacity of the nation to fight a war.
User reviews
Silly Dog
A highly detailed and thorough critique of Britain's industrial performance during WW II and the consequences into the 1950s and the -80s. The book duplicates a lot of the criticisms, analyses, and information given in the earlier book "The Collapse of British Power" (1972) by the same author.

The authors's main argument is that Britain's post-war political leadership (if not the majority of the electorate) wanted a welfare state with medical care, retirement pensions, housing, schools, and employment security -- and they wanted it NOW. There was only a finite amount of money (read: tax revenues) available, so something had to be eliminated. What got sacrificed was a modern industrial economy. It wasn't until the 1980s and even later that Margaret Thatcher battled the labor unions, education establishment, and other obstructions and started Britain on a modern technological path. The book is also a history of what untrammeled labor unions will do to both private industry and government controlled industry if given unaccountable power (which they were given in post-war Britain).

Another astonishing thing to read are the descriptions of the hundreds of memoranda generated by the
civil service bureaucracy and parliamentary committees on desirable social goals, post-war reconstruction, and numerous fanciful ideals -- most of which were written by people with no knowledge of the subjects and how to achieve the goals in reality. For example, a memorandum on future education was written by a collection of Anglican Church bishops and and Oxbridge dons. You can just imagine how applicable their concepts were to a society in desperate need of an education system to complement a highly scientific and technological economy.

The author (Correlli Barnett) at times has a very acerbic writing style. In one sentence commenting on a White Paper (produced in 17 drafts) on education, he writes that the paperwork generated would have confounded Field Marshal Montgomery and Albert Speer.
Rarranere
Barnett writes a scathing indictment of the failures of British society and governance to cope with the challenges of the Twentieth Century here: with the growing power and efficiency of the modern German state, more distantly with the Americans and Soviets, with the emerging needs of education, social services (infrastructure), industrial modernization and competition, organizational psychology, and grand strategic (defense) design. He excoriates Trinitarian wooliness and the welfare state generally, though where he would delineate the proper limits of government planning, fundings and interventions implied by The Swordbearers and The Collapse of British Power are unclear. This book should be read for its detailed narratives and accessments, but the reader has to make up his or her mind as to what principles are most cogent and best argued. Barnett has veered off into the direction of polemics at the cost of objective, historical analysis in his later writings, a trend that has caused some of his writings to lose some of their potential persuasive power. Still, this is a brief book useful for its detailed criticisms of British industrial practices at the time, and for general vagueness in formulating high government policy in general.
Tuliancel
A dry and boring account of how the cost of the war destroyed the British Empire.
Dobpota
Excellent book. I learned a great deal from it. There was a great deal in it, that I never knew. Even though I was a child in Britain at the time.
Blackstalker
One review described this book as `sustained howl of rage.'
If you ever wondered why Great Britain is no longer great - this book and the series it is part of - will explain why.
Maman
Correlli Barnett has been soberly {but with real fire and zeal in his "belly"} debunking the British establishment, industry, socialism and labor unions for the last 1/2 century on their complacency, failure to adapt to tecnological change and the national failure to train /educate the its people for challenges of the 20th {and 21st} century. Coldly and without concession he has dissected Great Britain's decline not as "Inevitable" but as an on-going series of short-sighted political and economic decesions allied to the best 20th century example {to use Paul Kennedy's phrase} of "Imperial Over-Stretch" - the retention of a huge empire{ for too long!} which cost it far more in treasure and blood than it was ever worth !!!

This 1986 publication has had more than its share of criticism {from British academics in the educational establishment} on some of it's detailed assertions but its overall theme of misplaced pride, illusion, wrongheadedness and self-deception that post 1918 Great Britain was still a rich, innovative, technologically advanced world power is hard to dispute.

The author takes the 1939-45 time frame of "Britains Finest Hour" - the record of her economic performance in World War 11 in her Industrial Machine / Production, the education / training of her Human Resources and the British populations expectations of a "egalitarian socialist paradise" after final victory. The fact the Britain by late 1941 was approaching national bankruptcy and was kept solvent after 1941 by American Lend -Lease Aid never sems to have entered into their equation !!! The Welfare, "Nanny State" and the enormous {and greatly underestimated costs} of the this "New Jerusalem" would be a economic mill-stone that after WW11 would sap vital resources from enabling Britain to rebuilding nad modernizing it;'s vital industries.

The Coal, Steel and Shipbuiding Industries are pitilessly exposed {past the seemingly impressive production #s} as being obsolete in their management industrial methods and technology - far behind Germany and the U.S.A. The aircraft industry is praised for the innovation of individual British aircraft designers that unfortunately was yolked to an industry that from 1936-1943 expanded at breakneck speed without adaquent upper amd middle management, skilled labor, proper production line supervision or the necessary machine tooling/factory layouts so that despite the impressive #s of aircraft produced {from 1940 on} the aircraft industry was no-where near as strong, productive or technologically advanced as it should have been or appeared.

The author exposes British industry's deficentcy's during the gearing up for a hurried rearmanant between 1936 -39. Instance after instance shows that the British industrial machine couldn't design or produce with it's resources key materials necessary for it'rearmament programs - insufficent steel production, high quality specialized steel production, wing machine guns for the new Hurricanes and Spitfires, aircraft instrumentation, light anti-aircraft guns, aiming apparatus for shipborne anti- aircraft guns, radio equiptment, warship Armour Plate, adding machines, specialized machine tools and a host of other items - all which had to be imported by what was once "The Workshop of the World".

And yet it was at the highest levels of research in a few elite university's and companies {Rolls Royce} that such great war wining items as Radar, High Direction Frequentcy Finding the Merlin Engine, the cavity magertron and anti aircraft proximity fuse were developed. But because of a shrunken/ limited British industrial base that had neither the manufacturing capability, skilled managment, the labor, technical and research ability to capitilize on producing and improving these products / industries. It was the U.S.A. that would ulitimately benifit most from these innovations by possesing the broad industrial base, skilled management and labor force to put them into mass production and by extension to take over and improve them.

But it was the legacy of 19th century Britian being "first out of the box" in industrializing and the problems that stemmed from that early supremacy that are the most interesting and disturbing part of the story. Complacent and non-innovative management, hostile and rigid labor unions clinging to old methods and their "rights" that would stifle innovation, two {2] educational systems - one for upper classes {the private school followed by an elite university} and the other "on the cheap" for the bulk of the population to make them artifically stupid and subordiniate which would be compounded by the fact that the only a small portion of the limited #s of university graduates from the 1870s thru the 1930s were taking university degrees that stressed science ,technology / technical education. Not only was Britain providing higher education for far too few of it's citizens but she wasn't educating enough of them in the skill sets for Britain to remain as a first class industrial nation. Does this sound Familar for the U.S.A in 2012? ?

The author brutally highlights the social, religous, political and educational prejudices of the British elites - their disdain for industrial production, manufacturing and technical education. Someone had to perform these tasks - it just wasn't going to be them !! Not surprisingly Britain's ability to provide the high quality techincal schools that stressed taking degrees for technology, science and engineering was limited because the politcal, social and manufacturing elites basically despised them. This overall pattern had been prevelant in Britain since before the 1870s and Barnett delves deeply into the long standing social, religous and political mores and prejudices on why industry and technolgy weren't considered worthy {in public or private education} of study or respect. I could go on but this book is so chock full of sober rational abuse and rage at the shortsighted "bloodymindness" of Britains social elites industrial management and labor unions that one can only "shake ones head in wonder" on how they let it get so far AND so bad !!. Unfortunately, the U.S.A's relative decline over the last 40 + years has many strong parallels with the authors highlighting the British decline in the 20th century, espisically in regards to the U.S.A. educational system and manufacturing decline.

This book graphically details the British decline ,malaise and lack of understanding on the deep seeded root causes of her fall as a world power and it was not because she {postwar} lost her empire or was forced to sell her oversea's assets to pay for WW 1 and WW 11. For those readers interested in 19th and 20th century British history, a corking good story and a possibile {probale?} road map of late 20th and 21st century American decline - I urge you to read this book and I give it 5 stars.