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Free eBook Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World download

by Theodore C. Bestor

Free eBook Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World download ISBN: 0520220242
Author: Theodore C. Bestor
Publisher: University of California Press; First edition (July 12, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 412
Category: Work and perfomance
Subcategory: Biography and History
Size MP3: 1864 mb
Size FLAC: 1515 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lrf mobi azw docx


Home Browse Books Book details, Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the. Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World. By Theodore C. Bestor. Bestor's vivid and meticulous study of Tokyo's seafood market is at once perhaps the best description we have of a modern, large-scale commodity bazaar, an important contribution to comparative economics, and a powerful analysis of the everyday workings of Japanese culture.

Tsukiji: The Fish Market. has been added to your Cart

Tsukiji: The Fish Market. has been added to your Cart. Yet the market is described as a must-see in most tourist books, and this in a city that has next to nothing in terms of tourist attractions. But perhaps this makes sense; Tokyo is a place where one can be and do rather than look and marvel, and the Tsukiji market is exactly that.

The importance of Tsukiji is is well depicted throughout the text mainly focusing on the ethnography of the market and the functions within a continually busy environment. It was a great read providing knowledge and understanding on how history shapes the future of a significant fish market. Fish is eaten everyday in Japanese culture its great to learn how a marketplace shapes the Japanese culture.

This is a rare book, full of treats for both the specialist and the general reader "Bestor's rich portrait of Tsukiji is set within the larger frame of Tokyo's .

This is a rare book, full of treats for both the specialist and the general reader. -Arjun Appadurai, author of Modernity at Large. Bestor's rich portrait of Tsukiji is set within the larger frame of Tokyo's urban history, helping us see clearly the forces which, over time, resulted in the creation of the world's greatest seafood market. Theodore C. Bestor is Professor of Anthropology and Japanese Studies at Harvard University and past President of the American Anthropological Association's East Asian Studies Section and the Society for Urban Anthropology.

March 26 (Tentative Date) Guest: Rosana Pinheiro Machado (Harvard Fairbanks Center- Universidad Rio Grande do Sul-Brazil) Together with TAULA. The World of Secondhand Clothing in Zambia. Pinheiro Machado, Rosana. The attribution of authenticity to real and fake branded commodities in Brazil and China. In: Andrew Bevan, David Wengrow. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Introduction and Chapters 5-6.

Tsukiji The Fish Market at the Center of the World. Bestor (Author). A remarkable voyage through a place, in time and space. Bestor’s book is the ultimate study of Tsukiji. American Journal Of Sociology, AJS.

In the centre of Tokyo, the world's biggest fish market is a complex socio-economic environment .

In the centre of Tokyo, the world's biggest fish market is a complex socio-economic environment staging daily auctions and also host to hundreds of stalls that sell to the public. Theodore Bestor explores the social and commercial relationships that make the system work.

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Located only blocks from Tokyo's glittering Ginza, Tsukiji―the world's largest marketplace for seafood―is a prominent landmark, well known but little understood by most Tokyoites: a supplier for countless fishmongers and sushi chefs, and a popular and fascinating destination for foreign tourists. Early every morning, the worlds of hi-tech and pre-tech trade noisily converge as tens of thousands of tons of seafood from every ocean of the world quickly change hands in Tsukiji's auctions and in the marketplace's hundreds of tiny stalls. In this absorbing firsthand study, Theodore C. Bestor―who has spent a dozen years doing fieldwork at fish markets and fishing ports in Japan, North America, Korea, and Europe―explains the complex social institutions that organize Tsukiji's auctions and the supply lines leading to and from them and illuminates trends of Japan's economic growth, changes in distribution and consumption, and the increasing globalization of the seafood trade. As he brings to life the sights and sounds of the marketplace, he reveals Tsukiji's rich internal culture, its place in Japanese cuisine, and the mercantile traditions that have shaped the marketplace since the early seventeenth century.
User reviews
Sataxe
I am not an anthropologist or a foodie who is steeped in the industry. But I did go to Tokyo for 4 days with some friends to find excellent sushi. Having seen Tsukiji in a couple of television specials and worked in a much smaller market in the past I thought it would be interesting to see the real thing. Perhaps I should blame Dr. Bestor for the fact that I ended up spending two half-days engrossed in Tsukiji market but once I read the book and got over the initial shock of the place I felt like I had an inside edge and couldn't pull myself away. The book does an excellent job of balancing personal insights and experiences with objective accounts of the market's history and statistics and provides a behind the scenes understanding of supply and distribution activity as well as the multigenerational, family-run stalls. It's one thing to see the tuna auctions; it's another to have an understanding of how the fish got there, who buys them, how they are sold to the supply and distribution chains, the role of the vendors, the history of the building and other details that give it depth. In the end, after four days of tramping around Tokyo to sample great sushi and other foods, we agreed that the best sushi we had was at a tiny restaurant in the outer market. And my visits to Tsukiji - which is sadly be being replaced by a more modern facility that can better meet the needs of a city that has grown since the facility was built - were the most fascinating part of my visit thanks largely to Dr. Bestor's book.
Saithi
The tale of the Tsukiji fish market is fully described in this book. From it's history to the economic place in the food industry to the everyday transactions this is the book to show all that. Fifteen years of research went into the book (published 2004) and if Prof. Bestor ever writes a follow up then he already has one buyer ready. Plenty of previous five star reviews that covers the positives of the book. Excellent addition to Asian studies library.
Arar
Must read for travelers to Japan.
Qulcelat
Fantastic story, fantastic English. Without long staying and dedicated fieldwork, no one can write a great book like this.
Kulalas
I think this book is an excellent expression of Japanese gastronomic, social and economic culture.

And from the anthropological point of view is great from a theoretical and practical perspective.
Mojind
Tsukiji, Tokyo's huge world-famous fish market, is a major attraction for foreign tourists to Japan, which is odd since there's not much for a tourist to look at or to buy. (Would you take home a kilo of fresh tuna?) There aren't any guided tours either. Yet the market is described as a must-see in most tourist books, and this in a city that has next to nothing in terms of tourist attractions. But perhaps this makes sense; Tokyo is a place where one can be and do rather than look and marvel, and the Tsukiji market is exactly that.

Tsukiji is almost nothing to look at but walk in and its people have things to do and places to go. The marketplace's grimy aging rows of cramped wet stalls house a teeming population of busy auctioneers, stevedores, and customers. Theodore Bestor's book brings it all to life and goes further by analysing in depth several aspects of the market.

After justifying Tsukiji (chapter 1) as a fit study for an anthropologist to pursue, Bestor gives us a thorough description of the key aspects of the Tsukiji marketplace: Tsukiji's neighbourhood, its (in the 1930s) avant-guarde form-follows-function layout (chapter 2); it's history (chapter 3); the importance of food culture in Japan and Tsukiji's lead-and-follow role in it (chapter 4); an economic analysis the value Tsukiji adds to the production chain (chapter 5); a true anthropological study of Tsukiji's society (chapter 6); a description of the mechanics of Tsukiji's auctions (chapter 7). At the end (chapter 8) Bestor peers a little into the future and reflects on Tokyo's changing landscape and the effects and likelihood of moving Tsukiji to a new location.

I originally intended to give Tsukiji only four stars because of a few drawbacks, but decided that this would have been churlish given how much I loved it. But here are a few warnings. Chapter 1 for instance is really meant for anthropologists who might question the study as legitimate anthropology; this chapter could have been shortened and included as a preface instead. Also, some of the material will confuse people who have never traveled to Japan. For instance while Bestor does point out that Japanese households buy their food daily, he doesn't dramatize it much. A section on how a typical Tokyo family spends a typical weekday from dawn to dusk, with a description of the children's lunch box, the husband's favourite eatery, and the wife's shopping would have helped the chapter on food culture.

But these are quibbles. Readers who live or visit Japan will love this book, readers who don't will need to work a little harder at visualizing some of it. And it is rewarding. "Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World" is a tightly focused study of one particular aspect of Japan; it will give readers a more intimate look than would a more general book on all of Japan.

All in all, highly recommended!