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Free eBook The life of Raymond Chandler download

by Frank MacShane

Free eBook The life of Raymond Chandler download ISBN: 0839829051
Author: Frank MacShane
Publisher: G.K. Hall; F First Printing Thus edition (1986)
Language: English
Pages: 306
Category: Unsorted
Size MP3: 1748 mb
Size FLAC: 1133 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: azw txt mobi rtf


Frank MacShane’s biography contains plenty of unique material and piercing insight and is key background to understand . A glance at the chapter notes of THE LIFE OF RAYMOND CHANDLER reveals that this biography's primary source is Chandler's letters.

Frank MacShane’s biography contains plenty of unique material and piercing insight and is key background to understand a shy, tormented and highly influential novelist. 3 people found this helpful. This has its advantages, since Chandler was an entertaining correspondent, making this biography fun to read. His letters, sent primarily to his associates in publishing, also show Chandler to be wryly self-deprecating, idealistic about the writer's quest, bristling and pugnacious in business, and restless.

Frank MacShane’s biography contains plenty of unique material and piercing insight and is key background to understand . 2 people found this helpful.

As Frank MacShane noted in his biography, The Life of Raymond Chandler, Chandler wished to be cremated and placed next to Cissy in Cypress View Mausoleum In 2010, Chandler historian.

As Frank MacShane noted in his biography, The Life of Raymond Chandler, Chandler wished to be cremated and placed next to Cissy in Cypress View Mausoleum In 2010, Chandler historian Loren Latker, with the assistance of attorney Aissa Wayne (daughter of John Wayne), brought a petition to disinter Cissy's remains and reinter them with Chandler in Mount Hope.

Raymond Chandler (1888–1959) was an American-British novelist and screenwriter. He was born in Chicago, Illinois and lived in the US until he was seven, when his parents separated and his Anglo-Irish mother brought him to live near London; he was educated at Dulwich College from 1900. After working briefly for the British Civil Service, he became a part-time teacher at Dulwich, supplementing his income as a journalist and writer-mostly for The Westminster Gazette and The Academy.

The Life Of Raymond Chandler was MacShane's book most likely to endure. His plea to take the life and perceptions of O'Hara seriously was a harder sell

The Life Of Raymond Chandler was MacShane's book most likely to endure. His plea to take the life and perceptions of O'Hara seriously was a harder sell. By praising O'Hara's precinct cop who picks up a phone and asks "Wukkan I do fya?" MacShane put his finger on what was least authentic in the writer's documentation of American life. MacShane taught at Williams College from 1965-67, then went to Columbia University. There he founded the graduate writing division and taught creative writing.

I do not find Frank MacShane's The Life of Raymond Chandler equally brilliant work, but it is a solid, informative . MacShane tries to paint Raymond Chandler as unhappy, lonely, and shy, a romantic and charming in the right circumstances

I do not find Frank MacShane's The Life of Raymond Chandler equally brilliant work, but it is a solid, informative, and interesting book, and I recommend it without any hesitation. I also need to provide a disclaimer of sorts: I consider Ross Macdonald to be a better writer than Mr. Chandler and I hope that subjective judgment does not color my comparison between the biographies. MacShane tries to paint Raymond Chandler as unhappy, lonely, and shy, a romantic and charming in the right circumstances. I don't think he succeeds, there's too much bad behavior on his part.

This remark, quoted by Frank MacShane in The Life of Raymond Chandler, is ironical for a number of reasons. First, Chandler worked exceedingly hard, sometimes despite physical and mental agony

This remark, quoted by Frank MacShane in The Life of Raymond Chandler, is ironical for a number of reasons. First, Chandler worked exceedingly hard, sometimes despite physical and mental agony. Second, Chandler believed that his work, which could never win the Nobel Prize, was not therefore without value.

by Raymond Chandler · Frank MacShane. Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)Creator of the famous Philip Marlowe, Raymond Chandler elevated the American hard-boiled detective genre to an art form. With humor, along with an unerring sense of dialogue and the telling details of dress and behavior, Raymond Chandler created a distinctive fictional universe out of the dark side of sunlit Los Angeles. Chandler’s last four novels, published here in one volume, offer ample opportunity to savor the unique. The High Window (Philip Marlowe, #3).

Raymond Chandler (1888-1959) was one of the pioneers of hard-bolied detective fiction, a form he perfected in his .

Raymond Chandler (1888-1959) was one of the pioneers of hard-bolied detective fiction, a form he perfected in his celebrated Philip Marlowe novels, including The Big Sleep, The Lady in the Lake, and The Long Goodbye. Библиографические данные.

Frank MacShane was an American writer, educator, and translator. MacShane is the author of such books as The Life of Raymond Chandler and Into Eternity: The Life of James Jones American Wirter. He worked as a professor of English at the University of California, Columbia University and Williams College.

Book by MacShane, Frank
User reviews
Teonyo
A great overall review of Chandler's life and work.
Jia
Dusted off my copy of this brilliantly-researched and very readable biography after re-reading “The Big Sleep”, Raymond Chandler’s 1939 debut novel published at the tender age of fifty. Today’s biographies often run to 6-800 pages or more, building on and arguing with earlier life histories, making ample use of the internet. In contrast, Frank MacShane’s artisanal 1976 bio has only 300 quite exciting pages, incl. several useful annexes.
This is an authorized biography, meaning MacShane had full access to whatever RC left behind in writing, including letters written and received. He found unique documents, such as payment accounts from long-defunct pulp magazines from the 1930s showing RC’s dismal earnings as a budding writer after his failing as an oil executive. MacShane also spoke, wrote or phoned with anyone who knew Raymond Chandler (1888-1959) personally. For new readers this biography is a goldmine, explaining RC’s early years in the US, his move to the UK at the age of twelve and his English public school upbringing; his return to the US aged 23 and the impact of 18 months service in WW I on his world view. Throughout, his biographer provides addresses where RC lived in California (usually furnished rooms). Crucially, MacShane shows convincingly how RC viewed writing as self- fulfilment and how he failed time and again to find a voice of his own, even as a top contributor to “Black Mask” and similar mass publications he calls the 1930s forerunners of TV. He finally found this voice when he moved from stories (15-18.000 words) to hardboiled crime novels starring Philip Marlowe.

MacShane’s historical portrayal of Los Angeles' murky politics, corrupt police force, criminal elements and their smelly (and racist) interaction are well summarized as a backdrop to Chandler’s novels, beginning with “The Big Sleep”. Much of the biography covers RCs novels, his sources of inspiration and writing methods and techniques, his perfectionism and interaction with publishers and fellow crime and screen writers. (E.g. RC carefully studied the works of Dashiell Hammett who also lived in LA, but they met only once.) Frank MacShane’s biography contains plenty of unique material and piercing insight and is key background to understand a shy, tormented and highly influential novelist.
Haal
fine service, decent copy of the book ordered, rcvd faster than expected, reliable, will order agn
Enone
A glance at the chapter notes of THE LIFE OF RAYMOND CHANDLER reveals that this biography's primary source is Chandler's letters. This has its advantages, since Chandler was an entertaining correspondent, making this biography fun to read. His letters, sent primarily to his associates in publishing, also show Chandler to be wryly self-deprecating, idealistic about the writer's quest, bristling and pugnacious in business, and restless.

At the same time, this reliance on Chandler's letters poses problems. MacShane, for example, gives relatively little space to THE BIG SLEEP or THE LADY IN THE LAKE, which published before Chandler's prolific letter writing went into high-gear. In contrast, he gives many pages to Chandler's time in Hollywood, for which there are abundant (and querulous) letters. Certainly, this unevenness in the record is a common problem for biographers. Even so, THE LIFE OF RAYMOND CHANDLER sometimes feels driven by the information at hand, not by the experiences that pertain to the creation of Ray's wonderful novels.

In the first nine chapters of the eleven-chapter THE LIFE, the face that Chandler presents to the world through his letters doesn't seem quite real. But in chapter ten, Chandler's wife Cissy dies at 84 and Chandler, 18 years her junior, falls apart. Then, his chronic drinking problem becomes suicidal and his arm's length relations with women--the elderly Cissy retired early to her own bedroom while Chandler wrote his letters--becomes a desperate search for another unsuitable partner. At this point, the craziness that Chandler contained as a married and friendless loner manifests. In retrospect, this reader is amazed that Chandler could achieve so much with such profound inner turmoil.

MacShane produces several excellent chapters in THE LIFE. My favorite is "Black Mask", which describes the so-called pulp writing business of the 1930s, where Chandler, in his mid-forties, got his start. MacShane observes: "There were about 300 pulp writers in New York, with another 1,000 spread around the country. Their task was to supply the nearly 200 million words that were needed to fill these magazines annually. It was an awesome industry, not unlike television today." (FYI: Today is 1976.)

MacShane also provides many interesting observations about Chandler's writing, many lifted directly from the correspondence. For example:

o Ray: "I guess maybe there are two kinds of writers; writers who write stories and writers who write writing."

o Ray: "The thing is to squeeze the last drop out of the medium you have learned to use."

o MacShane: When at last he began to write stories for the pulps and published his own novels, he pulled together the opposed aspects of his nature and created something extraordinarily vital and original. ... He knew that his writing held him together.

A solid four-star read.
Cordanara
I have read several biographies of Raymond Chandler. They are all excellent, but this one by
Frank MacShane is the best. The book came as described.