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Free eBook Sunset Oasis download

by Bahaa Taher

Free eBook Sunset Oasis download ISBN: 0340924888
Author: Bahaa Taher
Publisher: Sceptre (2010)
Language: English
Category: Unsorted
Size MP3: 1731 mb
Size FLAC: 1777 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: docx lit lrf mbr


As though the child were my teacher! How could a boy like him comprehend my divine plan for the glory of Macedonia and the peace of the world? He may have thought that he would move me when he said, 'Take us straight away to the execution field, that we may gain by our death what we sought to gain by yours!'

Sunset Oasis is an ambitiously weighty novel and its characters sometimes behave more like ciphers than real people: "I am not Sappho!" exclaims Catherine, true to her education, when Maleeka tries to embrace her. As if in sympathy, the translation, by the usually excellent Humphrey.

Sunset Oasis is an ambitiously weighty novel and its characters sometimes behave more like ciphers than real people: "I am not Sappho!" exclaims Catherine, true to her education, when Maleeka tries to embrace her. As if in sympathy, the translation, by the usually excellent Humphrey Davies, is occasionally ponderous.

Sunset Oasis was translated into English by Humphrey Davies and was published in the . Bahaa Taher, Love in Exile. London: Arabia Books, 2008.

Sunset Oasis was translated into English by Humphrey Davies and was published in the UK in 2009 by Sceptre. Sunset Oasis was translated into Norwegian by Unn Gyda Næss and is published by Vigmostad og Bjørke  . ISBN 978-1-906697-01-3. Irvine, Lindesay (2008-03-11).

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Bahaa Taher was born in 1935 in Cairo, Egypt

Все продавцы . Sunset Oasis. As the 19th century draws to a close, the politically disgraced Mahmoud Abd El Zahir takes up his post as District Commissioner of the remote and dangerous Egyptian oasis of Siwa, knowing he has no choice. Bahaa Taher was born in 1935 in Cairo, Egypt. He was active in the country& left-wing literary circles of the 1960s and in the mid 1970s was prevented from publishing his work. After many years of exile in Switzerland, he has recently returned to Egypt.

is eloquent testimony to the folly of imposing peace by violent means

is eloquent testimony to the folly of imposing peace by violent means. Wisely, Taher allows his readers to ponder the present-day implications for themselves. A widely read novelist in the Arab world, Egyptian Bahaa Taher has received honours and awards in Egypt and abroad, including the prestigious Italian Giuseppe Acerbi prize and, in 2008, the Booker Prize Foundation’s first International Prize for Arabic Fiction for Sunset Oasis.

Forbidden to marry or to enter the city and pass through its walls after sunset. Speaking for himself, he thought this was a system for society and for labour that deserved consideration; he might even go so far as to say it deserved admiration.

Part One. 1. Mahmoud. Forbidden to marry or to enter the city and pass through its walls after sunset. Observe, Mr Zahir, our colonies in Africa and Asia where chaos reigns because labour there-'. I interrupted him once again with a laugh and said, 'My dear Mr Harvey, we don't have colonies in Africa, or Asia. I managed, however, to prevent myself from saying, 'We're the colonized!'

Sunset Oasis - Bahaa Taher. Egyptian police offer Mahmoud Abd El Zahir is sent to administer the restive oasis community of Siwa in the late 1890s.

Sunset Oasis - Bahaa Taher. He smells a rat, knowing that his English overlords have been suspicious of his role in the major uprising in 1881-82 led by Colonel Arabi or Urabi Pasha against the English and the Khedive who had acceded to it.

User reviews
Phalaken
Great book!
Mitars Riders
Worth reading. Interesting story of 19th Century Siwa and its inhabitants.
Silly Dog
I don't know if I like it but my mom is reading it
Nejind
This novel is set in Egypt at the end of the 19th century. Many English readers may find parts of it hard going if they are unfamiliar with the history of that period, so here is the background, even if it looks a bit like a spoiler. In 1881 Colonel Arabi (here called Urabi) Pasha had started a nationalist revolt against European financial control of Egypt and against the Khedive who had acquiesced in it. The British navy had bombarded Alexandria in June 1882, had landed an army which defeated Arabi Pasha at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir in September 1882, and in 1883 had taken over political control of Egypt also. One of the two central characters of the novel, Mahmood, had been a lieutenant sent to the defence of Alexandria; had fallen out with Bedouin looters who claimed to be supporters of the Khedive; had been denounced as a traitor to the Khedive when the revolt was over; had been cleared, but was still held under suspicion by the British and by the Khedive's officials.

They therefore sent him as district commissioner and tax collector to the Siwa Oasis, not a place invented, but an area of 600 square miles, far out in the desert, some 350 miles west of Cairo. That was a dangerous assignment, not only because of the perils of getting there, but also because the Siwans, most of whom are not Arabs but Berbers, had, since its occupation by Egypt in 1819, been very hostile to rule from Cairo and had already, in two recent rebellions, the last only two years earlier, killed previous Egyptian district commissioners. In the oasis itself there was a centuries-old rivalry between two clans, the "Westerners" and the "Easterners", who had often fought each other, though both groups would form a common front against tax collectors from Cairo.

Mahmood, depressed but stoical, is married to Catherine, an Irish Catholic who shares her husband's hatred of British oppression. Against his advice, she insists on going with him: she is fearless; and not only does she love him, but she is also a scholar of antiquity. She knows that Alexander the Great had once campaigned in those parts; and it is a historical fact that he had visited the Siwa Oasis where an oracle had proclaimed him divine and the son of the god Amun (see [...] His sepulchre was originally in Memphis; was then moved to Alexandria; but after six centuries disappeared. Catherine has a hunch that it might have been moved to Siwa (anticipating the disputed claim made in 1995 by a Greek archaeologist, Liana Souvaltzi, that she had located it in the Siwa Oasis).

Anyway, Catherine hopes to find evidence for her hunch. On the way to the Oasis, she responds lyrically to the desert in all its moods, in the most beautiful descriptions. But the arrival of this emancipated woman, this infidel is of course seen as another provocation to the Siwans. In addition Mahmood is dangerously ignorant of the customs and superstitions of the community; Catherine has read about them in her books, but that does not stop her from offending against them.

By now the reader of this review can see that we are in for a story full of menace and tension in this hostile atmosphere, and it would be a spoiler to go into further details. The chapters alternate between the often introspective accounts of Mahmood, of Catherine - both haunted by their past, both having moments of self-loathing - and of some of the other characters. Towards the end of the book the tensions that develop between husband and wife or the effect of Catherine's sister Fiona arriving in Siwa are more prominent than the explosive situation in the Oasis - and in fact the novel ends, rather unsatisfactorily in my opinion, with a very different kind of explosion which leaves a lot of loose ends behind.
iSlate
I love Bahaa's elegant style in picking his words & descriptions . I liked this book ; which is my 2nd novel for him after (Love in exile) , again I am facing that gloomy desperate internal conflict for reaching peace ! I mean making peace with yourself- like if it impossible to accomplish such precious balance !!

The events took place in Siwa Oiasis , the magical place that inspired a lot of authors , (I believe Coelho was one of them in the Alchemist)..

The timing is at the late of the 19th century , after the British military occupation of Egypt ..

Here , we can taste the traditions of that so far era and area ;even the weird & unlogic ones , and the complicated relations among ( Egyptians ..British ..Irish .. Bedouins , Berber & Turkish ) at that time !!

beside that historical review of such era and much farther, we read about the legends of (Alexander the great ) his visit to the Oasis , his whole life & the romers about his tomb there !

this novel let us dive in how time & place can affect man & wife relationship.. , in facing the Contradiction between : East & west , love & desire , good & evil , bravery & cowardly ..and most of all Life & death ..
Kata
I enjoyed the book. I will let others tell you of the plot as they do in reviews. I was disappointed in the character development. You were never told what motivated the characters. We saw their actions and the result of their actions but never quite got to know the characters themselves. I enjoyed the landscape and would have enjoyed even more had the author chosen to give us more to read. Very happy i read the book but still, it lacked.
Samugul
Even as Egyptian , this novel shaded light on a part of our history & culture that was always forgotten , amazing book and it pushed me to search for older books for Bahaa Taher , I also recommend his book love in the exile