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Free eBook Prints of South-east Asia in the India Office Library: East India Company in Malaysia and Indonesia from 1786 to 1824: Catalogue download

by Great Britain: Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Free eBook Prints of South-east Asia in the India Office Library: East India Company in Malaysia and Indonesia from 1786 to 1824: Catalogue download ISBN: 0115801898
Author: Great Britain: Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Publisher: Stationery Office Books (September 1980)
Language: English
Pages: 242
Category: Unsorted
Size MP3: 1921 mb
Size FLAC: 1303 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: mobi lit azw doc


John Sturgus Bastin, Pauline Rohatgi, India Office Library.

John Sturgus Bastin, Pauline Rohatgi, India Office Library.

Indonesia (1) Malaysia (1) New York Library (1) prints (1. No library descriptions found. LibraryThing members' description.

Indonesia (1) Malaysia (1) New York Library (1) prints (1). refresh. Member recommendations.

the East India Company in Malaysia and Indonesia, 1786-1824. by John Sturgus Bastin. Published 1979 by .

John Bastin and Pauline Eohatgi: Prints of Southeast Asia in the India Office Library: the East India Company in Malaysia and Indonesia 1786–1824. xxiii, 228 pp. £25. P. B. R. Carey.

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The India Office Records are the archives of the administration in London of the . Malaysia and South-East Asia (mainly prior to 1868, but records continue to 1950).

The India Office Records are the archives of the administration in London of the East India Company and the pre-1947 government of India. The official archives of the India Office Records are complemented by deposits of private papers relating to the British experience in India. About the collection. They record the history of Britain as trade and empire permeated our society and the movement of people connected different worlds. They encompass almost any subject imaginable, and record the many people whose lives were touched by the activities of the Company and the India Office.

The India Office Records are a very large collection of documents relating to the administration of India from 1600 to 1947, the period spanning Company and British rule in India. The records come from four main sources: the English and later British East India Company (1600–1858), the Board of Control (1784–1858), the India Office (1858–1947), and the Burma Office (1937–48).

India Office Records from the British Library, 1599-1947

India Office Records from the British Library, 1599-1947. Download Flyer Watch Video Go to Collection. Discover the astonishing history of the East India Company, which at its peak controlled over a quarter of the world’s trade and millions of the global populace. From 16th century origins as a trading venture to the East Indies, through to its rise as the world’s most powerful company and de facto ruler of India, to its demise amid allegations of greed and corruption – the East India Company was an extraordinary force in global history.

The East India Company was established in 1600 as a joint-stock company of English merchants who received . Other groups of involvement have also resulted from India Office interest in the status of Indian emigrants to the West Indies, south and east Africa, and Fiji.

The East India Company was established in 1600 as a joint-stock company of English merchants who received, by a series of charters, exclusive rights to English trade with the "Indies", defined as the lands lying between the Cape of Good Hope and the Straits of Magellan; the term "India" had been derived from the name of a river, the Indus, long important. to commerce and civilisation in the region. The Company soon established a network of "factories" throughout the south and east Indies in Asia.