» » Hereward

Free eBook Hereward download

by James Wilde

Free eBook Hereward download ISBN: 0593064895
Author: James Wilde
Publisher: Random House Export (June 1, 2011)
Language: English
Category: Unsorted
Size MP3: 1834 mb
Size FLAC: 1958 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: azw lrf mbr lrf


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. 1062, a time many fear is the End of Days.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. With the English King Edward heirless and ailing, across the grey seas in Normandy the brutal William the Bastard waits for the moment when he can drown England in a tide of blood. The ravens of war are gathering. But as the king's closest advisors scheme and squabble amongst themselves.

Hereward James Wilde James Wilde Hereward CHAPTER ONE 29 November 1062 It was the beginning of the End-Times. Black snow stung the face of the young man. Skidding. CHAPTER ONE. 29 November 1062. It was the beginning of the End-Times. Skidding knee-deep down the white-blanketed slope, he squinted in the face of the blizzard as he struggled to discern a path through the wild countryside of high hills and dense forest. On his tongue, the bitter taste confirmed his fears: ashes, caught up in the swirling white flakes.

If doom and destruction lie ahead, why fret? It will come soon enough. ‘Do you not fear Judgement Day?’The warrior wrapped his cloak tighter around him against the stinging flakes. My sword and my axe and my good right arm serve me well enough. The woman eyed him from the depths of her hood, but said nothing. Twilight was giving way to black, and the snow swept down in sharp flurries. Outside the houses and workshops, men stamped their feet and blew on their hands as they prepared to end their last working day before Christmas

James Wilde is a Man of Mercia. He first encountered the great English warrior, Hereward, in the pages of a comic.

James Wilde is a Man of Mercia. It was while visiting the haunted fenlands of Eastern England, Hereward's ancestral home, that he became convinced that this legendary figure should be the subject of his first novel. The 'Hereward' series now runs to six novels, the most recent of which is Hereward - The Bloody Crown

James Wilde's thrilling, action-packed debut rescues a great English hero from the darkest of times and brings him to brutal and bloody life.

1062, a time many fear is the End of Days  . James Wilde's thrilling, action-packed debut rescues a great English hero from the darkest of times and brings him to brutal and bloody life. With the English King Edward heirless and ailing, across the grey seas in Normandy the brutal William the Bastard waits for the moment when he can drown England in a tide of blood

1062, a time many fear is the End of Days.

James Wilde - historical fiction author. Hereward Book One Six books. An unforgettable cast of characters. I've picked up a few new readers since the Dark Age saga launched, so i. 25 June ·. manofmercia. 3 May ·. Here's the cover for the third and final book in the Dark Age sequence - The Bear King. He first encountered the great English warrior, Hereward, in the pages of a comic

James Wilde is a Man of Mercia. The 'Hereward' series now runs to six novels, the most recent of which is Hereward - The Bloody Crown

1062, a time many fear is the End of Days. With the English King Edward heirless and ailing, across the grey seas in Normandy the brutal William the Bastard waits for the moment when he can drown England in a tide of blood.The ravens of war are gathering. But as the kingâ?™s closest advisors scheme and squabble amongst themselves, hopes of resisting the naked ambition of the Norman duke come to rest with just one man: Hereward...To some a ruthless warrior and master tactician, to others a devil in human form, Hereward is as adept in the art of slaughter as the foes that gather to claim Englandâ?™s throne. But in his countryâ?™s hour of greatest need, his enemies at Court have made him outlaw. To stay alive â?“ and a freeman â?“ he must carve a bloody swathe from the frozen hills of Northumbria to Flandersâ?™ fields and the fenlands of East Anglia.The tale of a man whose deeds will become the stuff of legend, this is also the story of two mismatched allies: Hereward the man of war, and Alric, a man of peace, a monk. One will risk everything to save the land he loves, the other to save his friendâ?™s soul...James Wildeâ?™s thrilling, action-packed debut rescues a great English hero from the darkest of times and brings him to brutal and bloody life.
User reviews
Hellstaff
I had a couple of false starts with this book until I read one of the reviews which compared him to Conan the Barbarian. Suddenly, I "got" it! I was trying to read this as straight (informative) historical fiction, but really I should have approached this book as a story about an epic hero, capable of fighting a bear and coming out unscathed, feeling no pain, afraid of nothing. Actually, I loved the Conan books, so once my head was on straight I had no trouble enjoying this novel.

Hereward is a hero with a past that continues to haunt him and drive him. He has been terribly wronged, and probably no amount of bloodshed is going to make his demons go away. And there is plenty of blood shed in this book! Hereward strikes me as more of a berserker, though this word is never uttered for he is not a Norseman. He is a Mercian with broken loyalties. Once he is possessed by rage, he seems to have the strength of ten men. Since I know he is going to be England’s last defender against the evil Normans, this fury seems to be appropriate, even welcome. Of course his unlikely companion, the troubled monk Alric, keeps trying to persuade him to control his passions, but when things start to heat up so does his temper. And I think we want to see this, because he is capable of great deeds when under the devil’s influence. Hereward is a complicated character, and I can see that book number one is setting the stage for further adventures.
Saithinin
I am a bit surprised at the number of reviewers on Amazon.co.uk that profess to have never heard of Hereward, especially those that seem to be fans of historical fiction. Hereward may not be part of history lessons at school. However, there are least four other novels out there on Amazon, in addition to Charles Kingsley's take that dates back to 1865. So, James Wilde's first novel is hardly on an unknown and original topic.

Then there is the characterisation. A number of reviewers have portrayed it as excellent with one going so far as to state that it had a "very gemmellesque feeling" (Waylander, an assassin character in David Gemmell's books) and "with "howardesque touches" (Conan the Barbarian). In plain English, at times you feel you are reading heroic fantasy, as opposed to the historical fiction you were expecting. In particular, the beginning scenes are indeed "action packed", but this is stereotyped action, Rambo style as others could not help noticing, during which the Super-Killer Hereward puts down single handed (with his sword in one hand, however!) and with buckets of blood and gore all the "nasties" and a whole pack of wolves. Then, in the middle of winter with snow underfoot and the blizzard howling, our wounded Super-Killer and the companion that he has reluctantly picked up walk to York which they reach after ten days as fresh as roses! Needless to say, this is quite unbelievable and is obviously not at all what I expected from a good piece of historical fiction. The other characters, while perhaps not perfect, are much easier to accept. Interestingly, you do not see much of the Normans in this episode, although they are, of course, the main "Arch-villains" (but they are quite a few others, suitably "nasty")

Having said that, it does get better and there are some significant strong points, but the author's intention to start his book with a "big bang" failed miserably as far as I am concerned, simply because he overdid it so much. So, to be a bit more constructive, here are the good points:

- The book is remarkably well-researched - much better researched than quite a few of its competitors - although there are one or two howlers that other reviewers have mentioned
- One of the strongest points is the depiction of the politics in the Kingdom of England at the end of the reign of Edward the Confessor, showing, in particular, that there was little love lost between Harold and his brothers, and Edwin Earl of Mercia, and his brother Morcar

- Then there are the battles - Stamford Bridge and Hastings (we do not hear anything about Fulford). Here, I was a bit surprised that other reviewers found that there was too little on them. This is a bit unfair because the book is about Hereward who did not take place in either of them. Anyway, it worked fine for me: I have read so many accounts of Hastings and almost as many of Stanford Bridge that I found it a relief to find these ones so short

- Another great point is the depiction of the fens where the author has also done his homework and were he does manage to convey a credible atmosphere of dampness, darkness etc... that you could expect to find in a good thriller

- There is originality in the story, with the character of Harold Godwinsson being the most prominent example. Instead of the usual glorious and noble hero fighting to protect the country against the "nasty" invaders, we get a power crazy character hungry to become King. On balance, and given the history of the Godwinssons and of their father, the latter is more realistic, although, there again, James Wilde tends to overdo it. However, Harold was not the "nice" romantic hero that he has been made out to be. He was a warlord and could be just as cruel as William. His expedition to Wales, just before becoming King, gave him some much needed military legitimacy to back his claim to the throne but it was probably just as destructive as William's destruction of the North a few years later, although on a smaller scale.

Three stars for this rather mixed first but valuable effort.
Erthai
It was good but it has the "good" Christian priest in it. All Christians are, were, and always will be scum! I do wish writers of historical fiction who see fit to even mention them would at least portrey them as the filth they are!
Otherwise it was pretty good and deals with a period in history which intrests me.
Gavirgas
I read James Wilde's The Time of the Wolf and thoroughly enjoyed it, so I was excited to read another book by him. Within the first paragraph I realized Hereward and Wolf are the same book (UK v. US publishing, I assume). I don't see that mentioned in either book description. If you've read one, no need to buy the other. If you haven't read either, I whole-heartedly recommend you do.
Hulore
I actually enjoyed this as a good romp, although I suspect its more a Hollywood version than history, and so didn't take it too seriously. But it led me to the historical figure, of which there seem to be several accounts I'm looking forward to exploring...

I wish Justine Hill of 'Shield Wall ' fame would do one on this guy...
Tane
I really liked the era ad world this was set in. Good character development and a fast paced novel. Looking forward to reading the installment. Only docked it one star as I felt the author did harp on a bit about the dark side of the hero's character, it needed to be mentioned but not repeated constantly (small point). Overall a good read and hopefully the start of a long saga of books about Hereward.
Fiarynara
A very violent page turner. This historical era is seldom seen in fiction I will be purchasing the next in series as it becomes available
Love the book