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Free eBook The Rolling Stone Interviews, 1967-1980: Talking with the Legends of Rock Roll download

by Jann Wenner,Ralph J. Gleason,John Carpenter,Jonathan Cott,Jerry Hopkins,Robert Greenfield,Jon Landau,Cameron Crowe,Greil Marcus,Patrick William Salvo

Free eBook The Rolling Stone Interviews, 1967-1980: Talking with the Legends of Rock  Roll download ISBN: 0312689551
Author: Jann Wenner,Ralph J. Gleason,John Carpenter,Jonathan Cott,Jerry Hopkins,Robert Greenfield,Jon Landau,Cameron Crowe,Greil Marcus,Patrick William Salvo
Publisher: St. Martin's Press; First edition (September 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 426
Category: Unsorted
Size MP3: 1788 mb
Size FLAC: 1329 mb
Rating: 4.5
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The Interviewers: Jann Wenner, Ben Fong-Torres, Ralph J. Gleason, John Carpenter, Jonathan Cott, Jerry Hopkins, David Dalton, Happy Traum, John Morthland, Robert Greenfield, Charles Reich, Jon Landau, Patrick William.

The Interviewers: Jann Wenner, Ben Fong-Torres, Ralph J. Gleason, John Carpenter, Jonathan Cott, Jerry Hopkins, David Dalton, Happy Traum, John Morthland, Robert Greenfield, Charles Reich, Jon Landau, Patrick William Salvo, Stuart Werbin, Robert Hilburn, Paul Gambaccini, Cameron Crowe, Peter Herbst, Greil Marcs, and Timothy White.

Although I admit, I am not a Rolling Stone kind of guy, I nevertheless have respected the Rolling Stone Interviews (and interviewers) over the years the same as I still respect the legendary Playboy interviews. This was the first time I had ever read a collection of interviews by Rolling Stone, and I must say that using the Playboy Interviews as a yardstick, I was very disappointed in them. I think the reason I was disappointed is that I expected a lot more. It is a truism deserving respect these days, that Artists in our culture may be the last of a dying breed of freethinkers.

Start by marking The Rolling Stone Interviews, 1967-1980: Talking with .

Start by marking The Rolling Stone Interviews, 1967-1980: Talking with the Legends of Rock & Roll as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The Interviewers: Jann Wenner, Ben Fong-Torres, Ralph J.

John Carpenter, Jann Wenner, Ralph J. G. Carpenter, John; Gleason, Ralph . Wenner, Jann; Cott, Jonathan; Dalton, David; Traum, Happy; Landau, Jon; Marcus, Greil. Gl. Published by St Martins Press (1995). ISBN 10: 0312689543 ISBN 13: 9780312689544. Published by St Martins Press.

Items related to The Rolling Stone Interviews, 1967-1980: Talking with. Some rock journalism celebrates rock's vivid personalities and their life styles; some rock journalism explores musical tradition and the meaning of rock & roll as a cultural fact and force

Items related to The Rolling Stone Interviews, 1967-1980: Talking with. The Rolling Stone Interviews, 1967-1980: Talking with the Legends of Rock & Roll. ISBN 13: 9780312689551. Some rock journalism celebrates rock's vivid personalities and their life styles; some rock journalism explores musical tradition and the meaning of rock & roll as a cultural fact and force. The best rock journalism, the classic Rolling Stone kind, pursues both paths. The Rolling stone Interviews are the quintessence of the best.

Six years ago, Marcus King felt lost. King is a big, soft-spoken guy who talks with the battered wisdom of a veteran touring musician ( I love soul food, but you can’t eat that shit every day ). A long-haired, pot-smoking kid going to school in the small town of Piedmont, South Carolina, he struggled to fit in - he hated sports and missed enough classes to nearly be expelled for truancy. I have nothing good to say about Piedmont, no good memories, says the guitarist. He comes from a long line of music lifers in South Carolina; his grandfather was a country guitarist who played with Charley Pride, and his dad was a local blues hero.

Rock and Roll Diary: 1967–1980 is a compilation album by Lou Reed

Rock and Roll Diary: 1967–1980 is a compilation album by Lou Reed. It was released by Arista Records in 1980 as a double album split between tracks by the Velvet Underground and tracks by Reed, attempting to demonstrate the arc of his songwriting over the first fifteen years of his career. The versions of "Heroin" and "Femme Fatale" are from the 1974 Velvet Underground live album 1969: The Velvet Underground Live. Coney Island Baby" comes from Live: Take No Prisoners.

Talking With the Legend of Rock and Roll.

Are you sure you want to remove The Rolling Stone Interviews: 1967-1980 from your list? The Rolling Stone Interviews: 1967-1980. Talking With the Legend of Rock and Roll. Rolling Stone (San Francisco. Published September 1989 by St. Martin's Press.

Greenfield, Robert: A JOURNEY THROUGH AMERICA WITH THE ROLLING STONES, Panther Books, St. Albans . Karnbach, James & Bernson, Carol: IT’S ONLY ROCK’N ROLL - THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO THE ROLLING STONES, Facts On File In. New York, USA, 1997. Albans, England, 1975. Heylin, Clinton: BOB DYLAN: THE RECORDING SESSIONS 1960 - 1994, St. Martin’s Press, New York, USA, 1995. Hoffmann, Dieter: DAS ROLLING STONES SCHWARZBUCH, New Media Verlag, Vaihingen, Germany, 1987. Kuhn, Michael: EAT IT - THE WELL WELL BOOK, Dead Dodo Publishing, Wittnau, Switzerland 1985.

The Rolling Stone Interview is a feature article in the American magazine .

The Rolling Stone Interview is a feature article in the American magazine Rolling Stone that sheds light on notable figures from the worlds of music, popular culture, or politics. Subjects of the interviews have ranged from former presidential candidate John Kerry to the landmark 1970 interview with John Lennon. The Rolling Stone Interviews: 1967-1980 : Talking With the Legends of Rock and Roll (1989

Some rock journalism celebrates rock's vivid personalities and their life styles; some rock journalism explores musical tradition and the meaning of rock & roll as a cultural fact and force. The best rock journalism, the classic Rolling Stone kind, pursues both paths. The Rolling stone Interviews are the quintessence of the best. For in the Interviews, the premier rock artists themselves are drawn out by the most knowledgeable and skillful of the journalists to talk articulately, frankly, and in great depth about themselves, each other, their music, their lives, our lives and times. This collection of the best of the Interviews, newly edited and with commentary by the editors of Rolling Stone, is the ultimate history of rock & roll as understood and told by the people who made it and made it big--the legends of rock & roll. The Legends: Chuck Berry, Johnny Cash, Ray Charles, Eric Clapton, Donovan, Bob dylan, Jerry Garcia, Mick Jagger, Billy Joel, Elton oh, G. B. King, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Joni Mitchell, Keith Moon, Jim Morrison, Van Morrison, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant, Little Richard, Keith Richards, Linda Ronstadt, Carly Simon, Grace Slick and Paul Kantner, Phil Spector, Rod Stewart, James Taylor, Pete Townshend, Stevie Wonder, and Neil Young. The Interviewers: Jann Wenner, Ben Fong-Torres, Ralph J. Gleason, John Carpenter, Jonathan Cott, Jerry Hopkins, David Dalton, Happy Traum, John Morthland, Robert Greenfield, Charles Reich, Jon Landau, Patrick William Salvo, Stuart Werbin, Robert Hilburn, Paul Gambaccini, Cameron Crowe, Peter Herbst, Greil Marcs, and Timothy White.
User reviews
Dalarin
I've had this book since it came out back in the 80's, and it is by far the best anthology of Rolling Stone interviews out there. Though the magazine has published revised and updated anthologies of interviews since this first one, this early edition is by far the the most comprehensive of all of them. It's a key piece of rock n' roll history.
Berkohi
I remember thumbing through this at my local book store back in the day and thought I'd like to have a copy of my own.
Saberblade
Great book.
Hallolan
Although I admit, I am not a Rolling Stone kind of guy, I nevertheless have respected the Rolling Stone Interviews (and interviewers) over the years the same as I still respect the legendary Playboy interviews. This was the first time I had ever read a collection of interviews by Rolling Stone, and I must say that using the Playboy Interviews as a yardstick, I was very disappointed in them. I think the reason I was disappointed is that I expected a lot more.

It is a truism deserving respect these days, that Artists in our culture may be the last of a dying breed of freethinkers. They may be all that remains of those whose minds have not yet been completely "socially adjusted" (i.e. lobotomized into Americanized consensus herd-think). So, naturally I was expecting some freewheeling exchanges here that would take the reader beyond the "beaten path." However, this was not to be the case. Even from the iconoclast Bob Dylan, the interviews here were kept close to the already well-known script. Issues such as how one artist feels about another one, whether they were on drugs or not, their next venues, what they think of their older music, etc, dominated these interviews and seemed to me are the kind of questions that would have been more appropriate for lesser magazines. Said another way, this collection was entirely too "chatty" and superficial for my taste. Instead of engaging in either the intricacies of the music, or into more philosophical issues about the art itself or even about what things affect the artists lives outside of music, it hewed close to inane issues more suitable for "People" magazine than for one with Rolling Stone's reputation.

It unnecessarily made those interviewed seem one-dimensional and shallow. And while this may indeed be the case for the run-of-the-mill pop music star, the collection here, for the most part, was intended to represent the trailblazers and the cream of the crop, and as a result, I expected the interviewer to get beneath the surface to help us understand from whence their creativity springs? But here the reader learns very little that he could not have gleaned from lesser-known pop rag sheets. Two stars