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by John Tully

Free eBook Djadja Wurrung Language of Central Victoria: Including Place Names download ISBN: 0646307878
Author: John Tully
Publisher: Self Published by Author (1997)
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The territory that the Djadja Wurrung had control of included the bulk of the Pyrenees Ranges and the watersheds of the Loddon, Avoca and Avon rivers

Dunolly, VIC: the author. The territory that the Djadja Wurrung had control of included the bulk of the Pyrenees Ranges and the watersheds of the Loddon, Avoca and Avon rivers. In loose terms, this covers the present towns of Castlemaine, Daylesford, Creswick, Clunes, Lexton, Avoca, Navarre, St Arnaud, Donald, Wedderburn, Boort and perhaps Bendigo, Charlton and Kyneton (Tully 1997:1).

Djadjawurrung or Dja Dja Wurrung, also known as the Jaara or Jajowrong people and Loddon River tribe, is a native Aboriginal tribe which occupied the watersheds of the Loddon and Avoca rivers in the Bendigo region of central Victoria, Australia. They were part of the Kulin alliance of tribes. There were 16 clans, which adhered to a patrilineal system. Like other Kulin peoples, there were two moieties: Bunjil the eagle and Waa the crow.

Release Date:January 1997. Publisher:Self Published by Author.

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Djadjawurrung or Dja Dja Wurrung . In the Kulin nation in central Victoria he was regarded as one of two moiety ancestors, the other being Waa the crow. Djadjawurrung, clan unknown. John Davis and Abraham Braybrook, convict shepherds, and William Allan

Djadjawurrung or Dja Dja Wurrung, also known as the Jaara or Jajowrong people and Loddon River tribe, is a native Aboriginal tribe which occupied the watersheds of the Loddon and Avoca rivers in the Bendigo region of central Victoria, Australia. Bunjil has two wives and a son, Binbeal the rainbow. John Davis and Abraham Braybrook, convict shepherds, and William Allan. Noorowurnin and another person.

Dja Dja Wurrung, clan unknown

Munangabum was an influential clan head of the Liarga balug and Spiritual Leader or neyerneyemeet of the Djadja wurrung who lived through two small pox epidemics and shaped his peoples response to invasion and European settlement in the 1830s and 1840s. Dja Dja Wurrung, clan unknown. An investigation into the conditions at Franklinford in February 1864 by Coranderrk superintendent John Green and Guardian of the Aborigines William Thomas found the protectorate school unfit for instruction and that the farms had all been abandoned.

John Ross on Repair Cafe for Daylesford. peterbroughan on Greetings from a proud decendent of Swiss Italians who came from Ticino to yandoit and the Goldfields

John Ross on Repair Cafe for Daylesford. peterbroughan on Greetings from a proud decendent of Swiss Italians who came from Ticino to yandoit and the Goldfields. John Ross on History in Story – Music and Dance. John Ross on Tuesday Cup Day at the Guildford Hotel. Recently Updated Pages.

The Djadja Wurrung people were the first inhabitants of the area and occupied most of central Victoria

The Djadja Wurrung people were the first inhabitants of the area and occupied most of central Victoria. The district was discovered by Major Thomas Mitchell in 1836. Clunes – the Station of Donald Cameron Esq. JP, H8. 1/42. The first European settler, Donald Cameron, took up a pastoral run in 1839, and named it ‘Clunes’ after his birthplace in Scotland. The name in Gaelic means ‘a green place’ or ‘a pleasant place’. First traces of gold were found on the property of Dugald Cameron, Donald’s uncle, in 1850. The discovery of gold in the area was concealed until 1851 when Irishman James Esmond,.

Many of the native British place names have been lost to us but the foreign tongue of the recent occupier often allude to the nature of the environment. With every successive immigration, we find a different way to describe the land

Many of the native British place names have been lost to us but the foreign tongue of the recent occupier often allude to the nature of the environment. With every successive immigration, we find a different way to describe the land. Roman occupation of England left a lasting reminder that can still be seen in place names. Places With a Roman Influence.