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Free eBook Perry Mason in the Case of Too Many Murders download

by Thomas Chastain

Free eBook Perry Mason in the Case of Too Many Murders download ISBN: 038070787X
Author: Thomas Chastain
Publisher: Avon Books (July 1, 1990)
Language: English
Category: Unexplained Phenomenons
Subcategory: Thrillers and Suspense
Size MP3: 1666 mb
Size FLAC: 1996 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: azw lit txt rtf


Perry Mason story written by Thomas Chastain rather than Erle Standley Gardner. However, story follows the Gardner mould and is a fast paced read. Mystery involves two related murders and how to establish who committed them.

Perry Mason story written by Thomas Chastain rather than Erle Standley Gardner. Thomas Chastain kirjoitti kaksi Perry Mason -tarinaa alkuperäisen tekijän kuoltua.

Either Mr Chastain changed his style, or (more likely) I was used to his writing; the things that jarred me in the first book are here, too - but knowing that they would be absent, they weren't as jarring is the first time. One thing that hit me hard was the Paul Drake, Jr and Perry Mason dialogue

July 1990 : USA Paperback.

July 1990 : USA Paperback.

Chastain, Thomas; Gardner, Erle Stanley, 1889-1970. Mason, Perry (Fictitious character). New York : W. Morrow. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on November 10, 2009.

Chastain was born in Canada but grew up in the south of the United States. Perry Mason in the Case of Too Many Murders (1989). Perry Mason in the Case of the Burning Bequest (1990).

Chastain was born in Canada but grew up in the south of the United States Chastain has worked as an author of crime fiction and mystery since his first work, Judgment Day, was published in 1962. He became a novelist full-time in 1974. Before the success of those novels, Chastain wrote a series of crime novels featuring Max Kauffman the Deputy Chief Inspector for New York City. The Prosecutor (1992).

This is the first new Perry Mason story to be published since the 1970s. A Los Angeles businessman kills his dinner companion and is himself murdered minutes later, leaving his estranged wife, the prime suspect in the case, to contact Perry Mason for help.

A Los Angeles businessman kills his dinner companion and is himself murdered minutes later, leaving his estranged wife, the prime suspect in the case, to contact Perry Mason for help.

Perry mason is back! After a hiatus of almost twenty year, the world's foremost lawyer/sleuth returns in the . The police think Adrian's estranged wife is the culprit, but Perry Mason's impeccable instincts tell him otherwise.

Perry mason is back! After a hiatus of almost twenty year, the world's foremost lawyer/sleuth returns in the most baffling case of his career. and to unmask a killer in a dazzling courtroom confrontation. And he'll take on a seemingly unwinnable case to assure the true assassin his judgment day in court.

Perry Mason returns in this novel by Chastain (Who Killed the Robins Family?), which will remind Mason's vast audience more of his recent TV movies than of Erle Stanley Gardner's novels.

1st ed. by Thomas Chastain. Case of too many murders. Published 1989 by W. Morrow in New York. 240 p. ; Number of pages.

Perry Mason in the Case of Too Many Murders Thomas Chastain A Los Angeles businessman kills his dinner companion and is murdered himself only minutes later, leaving his estranged wife, the prime suspect, to contact Perry Mason for help. Download Perry Mason in the Case of Too Many Murders. pdf Read Online Perry Mason in the Case of Too Many Murders. Absolutely right, since from book you can realize everything! From your country until finally foreign or abroad you will be known. About simple thing until wonderful thing you could know that.

A Los Angeles businessman kills his dinner companion and is himself murdered minutes later, leaving his estranged wife, the prime suspect in the case, to contact Perry Mason for help
User reviews
Ndyardin
As an owner of most of the Perry Mason books and having read and re-read them through the years, I was very interested in the continuation, especially after the other reviews here. I've just finished "The Case of Too Many Murders" and wanted to get my thoughts down.

The good news is that the book is very readable, and, except for certain "jarring" moments, I could easily believe I was reading an standard old-time Perry Mason story. The following are the things that jarred me:

- This book is set in the future; it doesn't say how far, but, say, 20 years (and that is probably conservative -- see following). I find it very hard to believe that Paul Drake and Lt Tragg have retired, but Perry Mason is still working. I think the ESG books give Perry's age as around 40, which means that he may be in his 60s here. If you asked me which would be able to retire first: a lawyer, a policeman, or a private detective, I would pick the lawyer every time. 20 years may be too little, as Paul Drake has had time to marry, have a son, and have the son take over his business.

- The description of the characters are missing: In nearly every book, ESG described Perry Mason ("granite-faced"), Paul Drake, Della, Tragg, and Hamilton Burger. All missing, and I would have liked to read Paul Drake, Jr's description.

- Perry Mason had a car phone: I list this because the first time he used it, it surprised me, but then, on reflection, why not? Perry would certainly keep up with technology

- Gertie is still the receptionist!?!?! Really? I didn't think receptionists would stay for 20+ years.

- Not a word about Hamilton Burger; I guess he, too, retired or moved on.

- Della's role has changed; she's not the confidante anymore; she doesn't sit in on meetings in his office (this was one of the BIG "jars" for me). She is no longer his "sounding board" for the cases. She seems to be more like the television move Della that did a lot of research. But her concern that he was getting in too deep is gone, and their respect and admiration for each other is often expressed in the older books; nothing here.

- The tension between Perry Mason and the police is gone. Perry and Tragg respected one another, but Tragg believed that Perry would go too far in protecting his clients to the extent of interfering in a police investigation. Ray Dallas, the new man is a friend of Perry's. No one seems to bear Perry Mason any ill will on the force, and that tension is gone

- Speaking of tension, there is little between the prosecutor and Perry Mason. Hamilton Burger, the DA, was always out to show up Mason, and it made for good drama. This is gone; there are some courtroom sparks, but people are more buddy-buddy.

- Another big "jar" for me was the client calling Mason at home. In the ESG books, the point was repeatedly made that only Paul and Della had Perry's number, and that is was unlisted. Yet, the client just calls Mason up late at night. I certainly would expect Perry to keep an unlisted number.

- Paul Drake, Jr. I don't know if this character was created after the TV movies with him or if he was created for these series, but in the book and in the series, they are different. In the moves, Perry and Paul, Jr, don't quite get along - they are fine in the book.

- One of the typical hallmarks of the old books is Paul grumbling about the chores he's given, and whether or not he'll keep his license or the state of this stomach over soggy hamburgers -- this is gone, too.

- In the ESG books, Mason is a fighter and the reader has no doubt that he could handle himself if things turned rough. It isn't clear if Mason is still this way

Even with the changes, the story moved along, and seemed to be a typical Perry Mason story.

This is a kind of Perry Mason-lite tale -- much of the tension removed, and typical ESG material cleaned up. Would I read it again? Yes.
Hbr
arrived on time and was just as described except that it wasn't written by the original author of the perry mason series but still enjoyable and the book was in good shape
Hanad
Mr. Chastain doesn't write as well as Erle Stanley Gardner by a long shot. I'm reading it but not really enjoying it.
Book in great condition so far.
Monam
good
Doomwarden
I really enjoyed it. Seemed like it went along with the latest versions of Perry Mason TV series. It was written in great style!
Tiv
The Case of Too Many Murders

In Chapter 1 Gil Adrian walks into the Oaks Restaurant. Gil has been accused of bribing city and state politicians, and being connected to organized crime. A stranger joins him, and they begin to leave. Suddenly, Gil shoots this stranger and takes off in his black Mercedes. The police are called, and go to Adrian's house. They find Gil's wife outside, enter the house, and find Gil dead in the den from two shots to his head! [Gardner always played down the background corruption in his stories. The idea of a double popped into to my mind.] Chapter 2 provides an example of wrongful conviction, which happens more often than the dramas on TV would suggest. This is an omen for Chapter 3, where Mrs. Gil Adrian, the trophy wife, retains Perry Mason. Laurel doesn't know much about Gil's business, or of any powerful enemies. Does the political establishment want to hang the murder on Laurel and thus bury the scandal? Mason learns the stranger Gil shot was unidentified; all he had was cash, a phony driver's license, and a .22 pistol strapped to his ankle. Wasn't a .22 pistol the weapon of choice for hit men asks Mason? Mason contacts David Niles, a Federal prosecutor, and suggests an alliance. [This never happened in the original series, to my recollection.]

Chapter 8 tells of the beating that was given to Paul Drake Jr. after he questions Anselmo Costa in Las Vegas. Perry Mason also visits Las Vegas to ask questions, but learns little more. The preliminary hearing in Chapter 19 is as good as Gardner's best. It tells why a defendant shouldn't wear sunglasses. Chapter 20 explains why getting testimony about 'Karl Braundorff' was important. This led to Janet Coleman, a 'roper' (like Raymond Schindler), who told of Gil Adrian's visit to Las Vegas. Then Anselmo Costa is summoned to the witness stand, but he asserts his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. Perry Mason gets a clue from the artist drawings on TV. The bank is subpoenaed to find the last check written by Ralph Adrian, Gil's son, before Ralph was murdered. These clues help to solve the puzzle, and Laurel Adrian is freed.

This story brings in updated procedures (the defense gets a list of the prosecutor's witnesses), and mentions the terrible traffic in Los Angeles since the 1960s. But the flavor of the original stories has been lost. Paul Drake has retired, and Perry Mason would be an octogenarian, if still alive. What is missing is a younger lawyer, Perry Jr. or Della Mason, to carry on the father's work. This story is like a good reproduction of an old master like Rembrandt, but in a modern setting. It lacks the dedications that were part of the original series.