Free eBook The Zero Hour download

by Joseph Finder

Free eBook The Zero Hour download ISBN: 0380726653
Author: Joseph Finder
Publisher: Avon (April 1, 1997)
Language: English
Category: Unexplained Phenomenons
Subcategory: Thrillers and Suspense
Size MP3: 1589 mb
Size FLAC: 1785 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: mobi lit rtf txt


As a huge Joseph Finder fan, I bought this book in advance and then counted the days until it appeared in my Kindle.

Ships from and sold by GEORGE STORE. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). As a huge Joseph Finder fan, I bought this book in advance and then counted the days until it appeared in my Kindle. Maybe it was my anticipation that spoiled it. The beginning jailbreak was heart-stopping and thrilling - everything I've come to love about all of his other books. But then it quickly bogged down in endless and exhaustive details that slowed the pace to the point of distraction.

Joseph Finder (born October 6, 1958) is an American thriller writer. His books include Paranoia, Company Man, The Fixer, Killer Instinct and Power Play

Joseph Finder (born October 6, 1958) is an American thriller writer. His books include Paranoia, Company Man, The Fixer, Killer Instinct and Power Play. His novel High Crimes was made into the film of the same name starring Ashley Judd and Morgan Freeman. His novel Paranoia was adapted into a 2013 film starring Liam Hemsworth, Gary Oldman and Harrison Ford.

Joseph Finder is the author of The Moscow Club (1991), Extraordinary Powers (1993), The Zero Hour (1995), and High Crimes (1998). He is an expert on Russian affairs, international politics, and intelligence, and has written for The New York Times, The New Republic, and The (London) Times. Start reading The Zero Hour on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent. The prince of darkness is a gentleman. William Shakespeare, King Lear. Praise for New York Times bestselling author Joseph Finder and his novels. The supreme art of war. is to subdue the enemy.

New York Times Bestselling Author. Series: Standalone Novels.

Joseph Finder was born in Chicago, Illinois on October 6, 1958, and spent his .

Joseph Finder was born in Chicago, Illinois on October 6, 1958, and spent his early childhood in Afghanistan and the Philippines. in Russian studies from Yale University and a . His first novel, The Moscow Club, was published in 1991. His other novels include Extraordinary Powers, The Zero Hour, Paranoia, Power Play, and the Nick Heller series.

Joseph Finder is a great storyteller, and after passing this one by for years, I came back and read it, even thought it's one of his oldest books. He knows his stuff - from technology to weaponry to the ways people think, and it's 99% believable. Even though the information is dated, the story is still fresh and I wanted to read half of it in one sitting last night, but finally went to bed. What I like best is that much of the book follows the villain, Baumann, an ice-cold terrorist and killer.

Joseph Finder was born to be a spy. Much of his childhood was spent living around the world, including time in Afghanistan and the Philippines. From an early age, Finder was placed in extremely stressful environments with many unfamiliar faces surrounding him. Eventually, Finder’s family settled permanently just outside of New York. Finder was born into the Cold War era of detente and mutually assured destruction with Russia

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A renegade U.S. billionaire has enlisted the services of a terrorist called the "Prince of darkness" in order to punish America. The most resourceful killer alive has been granted the knowledge and the power he needs to destroy the foundations of global finance in one explosive instant.

FBI Special Agent Sarah Cahill is leading the manhunt, matching wits with the most formidable opponent of her career. But she is unaware of the scope of the terror she is up against. And it may already be too late--for Sarah, for her young son. . .for their world.

The Zero Hour is approaching.

The future is ticking away.

User reviews
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
Imagine a thriller set in New York City. It's a story about an impending terrorist attack on Wall Street. The cast of characters includes a chameleon-like terrorist-for-hire reminiscent of Frederick Forsyth's Jackal, a fugitive financier thirsting for revenge against the banker and the system that forced him to flee the U.S., a brilliant American investigator whose life is complicated by a jealous ex-husband and a precocious 8-year-old son, a prominent and wealthy banker with a taste for masochistic sex, and a crusty New York City police lieutenant who knows all the tricks ever tried.

Now imagine this cast of characters acting out their roles a decade and a half ago, five years before 9/11 -- when the book was published. Given the tragic turn that history took in September 2001, you might suspect that The Zero Hour would come across as lame. It doesn't. In the skillful hands of Joseph Finder, for whom this was the third of what by now is a total of ten thrillers about espionage and business, The Zero Hour is compelling. In fact, it's fascinating to look back across a gap of just 15 years and realize how much our world has changed. Then, New York's Joint FBI/NYPD Terrorism Task Force was sorting through the disquieting lessons of the first World Trade Center attack and the Oklahoma City bombing.

The Zero Hour tells the tale of a South African-born terrorist best known as Henrik Baumann or "The Prince of Darkness." We never learn his birth name. Baumann has been sprung from a high-security prison near Cape Town to do a job for hire -- unquestionably, the biggest in his long, blood-streaked career and, necessarily, the last. As he moves ahead methodically to complete his assignment, Baumann eventually squares off against FBI Special Agent Sarah Cahill, who has been put in charge of the Joint Terrorism Task Force's operation to thwart his attack. To reveal more of the story would be cruel.

This is a complexly plotted and highly satisfying novel of suspense. What elevates The Zero Hour out of the pack is the extraordinary technical detail that Finder weaves into the story, revealing a level of understanding of the practical side of his story that only very thorough research could produce.

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Blackbrand
As a huge Joseph Finder fan, I bought this book in advance and then counted the days until it appeared in my Kindle. Maybe it was my anticipation that spoiled it. The beginning jailbreak was heart-stopping and thrilling - everything I've come to love about all of his other books. But then it quickly bogged down in endless and exhaustive details that slowed the pace to the point of distraction. It's almost as if the explanations ate up all of the words he could have used on character development. Sarah Cahill comes up short, in my estimation, of a well rounded character. She didn't seem quite strong enough to handle all that was thrown her way. And the minute she met Brian, who couldn't figure out that he was Baumann? And the acronyms were like too many jimmies on a cupcake...you know,the kind where you're crunching too much to enjoy the frosting. And annoying as they lodge in that space between your teeth.

I've loved Mr. Finder's foray into corporate intrique...he is a master at this and so little is written, in his style, about the corporate world. I must have sold thousand of copies of Company Man, Paranoia, Power Play to friends that I insisted read his work. Sadly, I won't be referring them to The Zero Hour. But I hope Mr Finder dives back into the world of corporate intrique soon. I missed his signature wit in this book...couldn't find any breaks of wry humor. Heavy sigh..... :(
Beardana
While I'm a fan of Joseph Finder, it took me a long time to finish this book! It is filled with so much technical jargon that it made reading tedious & at times boring. Maybe the storyline called for it, but it wasn't my thing. Maybe if you are a techie, you'll enjoy it.
Gietadia
I love Joseph Finder stories. His characters are well thought out and his story line is always commanding. Every time I start a Joseph Finder book, I can't put it down till I'm done. Most importantly, each story is unto itself and you don't see repeat concepts. My Kindle is loaded with his books.
Neol
My problem with this book was not with the characters or the plot, it is with the endless amount of minutiae and descriptions of complex electronic devices that I care nothing about. The story gets bogged down and it is difficult to plod through all the useless information.

The Prince of Darkness is a fascinatingly clever terrorist who is really more than a match for a gal like Sarah Cahill. A brilliant person like this could never be brought down so easily by a less than worthy opponent. A more perceptive person than Sarah could never have been drawn in so easily.

Altogether, even with the copious number of statistics, this is an entertaining read. It should have been much shorter but it is still worth the time.
Groll
Henrik Baumann is a terrorist for hire, and a nightmare for counterterrorism experts. He is off the grid, no pictures of him exist. Baumann is hired by a billionaire US expat, determined to wreak terrible revenge on the U.S. The FBI gets the faintest whiff of the plot, and a task force is set up to find and stop the terrorist. The action is non stop, and Baumann is a particularly lethal villain. Good entertainment.
Oppebro
I wanted to like this book, since I'm a fan of Finder. It started out drawing me in because it developed the one of the main characters, but after that, I found the pages bogged down with data that I wasn't interested in and couldn't follow anyway. I got to page 100 or so and just put it down. Seems to me the character development took second place to stuff about computers, how phone calls get tracked, etc. Boo hiss.
AS ALWAYS JOSEPH FINDER DELIVERS A GREAT STORY. I cannot put down his stuff once I start to read it. The only disappointment is that he isn't writing fast enough. I'm a mystery writer, and I'm picky, and read hundreds of books a year, but I have to say, this is one guy (I have a list of about a dozen that I buy the minute they come out) that I can't wait for the next one. Good storyteller! And he makes it believable. I quickly suspend my disbelief, buy the premise, and am off for the ride.