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Free eBook The Dark Streets: A Jack Liffey Mystery (Jack Liffey Mysteries) download

by John Shannon

Free eBook The Dark Streets: A Jack Liffey Mystery (Jack Liffey Mysteries) download ISBN: 1933648910
Author: John Shannon
Publisher: Pegasus Books (April 28, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Unexplained Phenomenons
Subcategory: Mystery
Size MP3: 1574 mb
Size FLAC: 1152 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: docx lit lrf mobi


The Dark Streets takes private investigator Jack Liffey to LA's glitzy. John Shannon is one of America’s leading writers of neo-noir.

The Dark Streets takes private investigator Jack Liffey to LA's glitzy. His Jack Liffey series of novels is one of the most critically praised mystery series in the genre and includes Terminal Island, Dangerous Games, The Dark Streets, The Devils of Bakersfield, and Palos Verdes Blue. Shannon lives in Los Angeles. Series: Jack Liffey Mysteries (Book 9).

John Shannon's Jack Liffey character is one of those engaging, scruffy, financially insolvent detectives with LA street smarts .

John Shannon's Jack Liffey character is one of those engaging, scruffy, financially insolvent detectives with LA street smarts-a tough veneer, but vulnerable with a heart of gold. Liffey himself is having a hard time dealing with the driveby shooting of his daughter Maeve. All these strands careen toward a potentially fatal conclusion.

Book 5 of 13 in the Jack Liffey Mystery Series. The Orange Curtain, Shannon's fifth Jack Liffey novel, garnered high praise from critics and drew readers' attention to an intelligent and literate hard-boiled crime series

Book 5 of 13 in the Jack Liffey Mystery Series. The Orange Curtain, Shannon's fifth Jack Liffey novel, garnered high praise from critics and drew readers' attention to an intelligent and literate hard-boiled crime series. In his sixth outing, Liffey, a former aerospace worker who tracks missing children for a living, has been hired by Bancroft Davis, a prominent black civil rights leader of the 1960s, to find Davis's missing adopted son and his white girlfriend, who disappeared after a run-in with a skinhead motorcycle gang.

The Dark Streets book. Again, as in all the Liffey mysteries, the superbly-crafted action that makes John Shannon one of the most e The Dark Streets takes private investigator Jack Liffey to LA's glitzy, exotic Koreatown, where a young film student, Soon-Lin Kim, has apparently gone missing.

Book Overview Again, as in all the Liffey mysteries, the superbly-crafted action that makes John Shannon one of the most.

The Dark Streets takes private investigator Jack Liffey to LA's glitzy, exotic Koreatown, where a young film student, Soon-Lin Kim, has apparently gone missing.

The Dark Streets takes private investigator Jack Liffey to LA's glitzy, exotic Koreatown, where a young film .

Liffey, Jack (Fictitious character), Private investigators, Liffey, Jack (Fictitious character), Private investigators. New York : Pegasus Books.

Dangerous Games A Jack Liffey Mystery Jack Liffey Mysteries.

John Shannon (born 1943) is a contemporary American author, lately of detective fiction. He cites as his literary influences Raymond Chandler, Ross Macdonald, Graham Greene, Robert Stone and Jim Harrison. Born in Detroit, Michigan, Shannon moved with his family to San Pedro, the gritty harbor district of Los Angeles, California, when he was five

The detective the Chicago Tribune declared "the most interesting since Walter Mosley's Easy Rawlins" himself goes missing.

The Dark Streets takes private investigator Jack Liffey to LA's glitzy, exotic Koreatown, where a young film student, Soon-Lin Kim, has apparently gone missing. Early in his search for her, Jack learns that Soon-Lin has been tangling with a giant Korean conglomerate. Again, as in all the Liffey mysteries, the superbly-crafted action that makes John Shannon one of the most exciting detective-fiction writers on the California scene envelops Jack, and ultimately he finds himself under torturously intense interrogation at the secret compound of a private security agency―and for a climax as explosive as the violent lightning storm in the desert sky.
User reviews
Phobism
John Shannon's Jack Liffey series tries to say something about the contemporary human condition while following Liffey who ekes out a bare living trying to find missing people. In this episode Soon-Lin Kim, a Korean-American film student and political activist, is missing. Her father hires Jack to find her. Soon Liffey is immersed in the angst of the now elderly former "comfort women", Korean women who were forced to service the soldiers in the Japanese army during World War II. In a sub-plot, Liffey's 17-year-old daughter Maeve, goes hormonal with a Latino gang member. In another sub-plot Liffey's sexual relationship with a LAPD detective also suffers angst. The novel ends with a climactic battle in a mysterious desert compound.

Jack Liffey is an incredibly inept pseudo-P.I. who always tries to do the right thing, usually for a client who is as poor as he is. His paranoia invariably gets in the way of his efforts. Usually the storytelling is good enough to get us past our irritation with our hero who always does it the long and hard way. In this book the subplots involving Maeve and his policewoman girlfriend read like outtakes from previous books that were removed in the editing, and don't relate well to the main plot. Maybe he had to write a minimum number of pages and couldn't get there on plot alone? This is definitely one of the weaker entries in this usually entertaining series.
Lonesome Orange Kid
I am normally a fan of mysteries and thrillers that are heavy on character development and that let me share in the main characters' life as it develops from book to book. In this book, however, the plot suffers - it seems to be a token side-issue compared to the story of Korean "comfort women" and of Liffey's daughter Maeve.

So -- the biggest problem, as has been noted vociferously by other reviewers, is Maeve. Maeve has generally been depicted as a smart, not particularly rebellious teenager. And this girl decides to turn herself into a gangsta moll? Puh-leeze. She must be aware that the lives of these gang members are going nowhere (unlike hers) and I can't see her longing to "fit in" with them. Furthermore, I can't imagine her being dumb enough to jump into a sexual relationship with one of them, and not use protection against pregnancy and AIDs. This isn't the '50s!

Although the passages about the Korean "comfort women" were interesting, they were left adrift in the text -- all they did was justify the work of the missing Korean teenager. I expected a lot more relating to the post-war actions of the Japanese and saving the residence hotel, but none of it was there. Just a tiny and ineffective group of kids.

I expected more.
Globus
I read a positive review of Mr. Shannon's Jack Liffey Series in the New York or LA Times some time last year. I was sorry I had not come across the series before as I am very fond of mysteries that provide a strong sense of place e.g. Spencer and Boston. I began with the Liffey mystery Concrete River and then because I liked that one quite a lot bought the others - mostly going book by book through the series. I have been increasingly put off but the family stuff however. It just doesn't work for me. I am totally in favor of sub-plots (and like at least one or two to be included) but Mr. Liffey's ex-wife and his reckless obnoxious daughter just don't work for me. I inwardly groan every time they show up on the page. The Dark Streets is interesting and overall quite a good read, but the teen daughter's involvement with the Latino Gang-banger was disgusting and tedious. And now she is pregnant! (How dumb can this girl be!) I anticipate the (dumb obnoxious) daughter and her Gang-banger paramour to have an ever increasing presence in the Liffey series and perhaps their child will be included in the plot also. So unfortunately the Dark Streets and pregnant Maeve have ended my romance with this series.
Qulcelat
Heroics of main character come through by his braving adversity through his intelligence, morality, and internal fortitude rather than fisticuffs. However the book is no less vivid and exciting as a result while effectively exploring past and current political issues woven into the storyline. A minor cavil is that conclusion of the daughter's story is somewhat pat and abrupt.
Reggy
Product was bought as a gift for a relative. Appearance is good. I am sure the recipient will be happy.