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Free eBook Stories from the Haunted South download

by Alan Brown

Free eBook Stories from the Haunted South download ISBN: 1578066611
Author: Alan Brown
Publisher: University Press of Mississippi; 1st Edition edition (August 25, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 307
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: United States
Size MP3: 1100 mb
Size FLAC: 1484 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: docx mobi azw lrf


When Alan Brown published his well-received Haunted Places in the American South, a kind of seance swirled around him. Locals who knew ghost stories began haunting him with ghoulish reports from houses, schools, libraries, sanitariums, inns, battlefields, train depots, radio.

When Alan Brown published his well-received Haunted Places in the American South, a kind of seance swirled around him. Locals who knew ghost stories began haunting him with ghoulish reports from houses, schools, libraries, sanitariums, inns, battlefields, train depots, radio stations, and bridges. Following these leads, he uncovered even more ghost-ridden southern locales

Before Alan Brown wrote Haunted Places in the American South, only the locals knew what .

Before Alan Brown wrote Haunted Places in the American South, only the locals knew what was lurking in these locations. Slamming doors, eerie lights, and Confederate soldiers' ghosts kept some folks too scared to talk with outsiders. The book collects ghost stories from fifty-five historically haunted sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

Alan Brown gathered these stories from newspapers, magazines, museum directors, archaeologists, hotel managers .

Most of these stories have never appeared in book form, and some, such as the haunting of Peavey Melody Music, have never been published at all. Haunted Places in the American South differs from most other collections of southern ghost stories, for the featured sites include more than just haunted houses

Haunted South Carolina. Phantoms from Indian conflicts, American Revolution, and the Civil War still wander South Carolina. Thriller & Crime Horror.

Haunted South Carolina. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Haunted South Carolina: Ghosts and Strange Phenomena of the Palmetto State. Haunted Tennessee - Alan Brown. The haunting of an unkind kitty, a discussion of the ghost story structure, and a very scary pantry door Scribd Podcasts.

The haunted house is a staple of the American town, from the most .

The haunted house is a staple of the American town, from the most haunted places in New York State to the ghostly homes that make up some of the haunted places in . to get spooked at. The stories behind these homes-of ax murders and massacres, of lost children, angry demons and ghosts-will give you more shivers than even the best Halloween movies. American Horror Story: Coven has reignited interest in this famous French Quarter haunt. Molly Brown House, Denver, CO. The "Unsinkable Molly Brown" was one of the only people to survive the Titanic, but she wasn't entirely unstoppable: She died in New York in 1932.

Details Coming Soon Stories from the Haunted South. University Press of Mississippi.

These are nine of the scariest real-life haunted house stories from the creepiest places around the . The Lemp Mansion in St. Louis is known to be one of the most haunted places in America, due to a tragic history that continues to haunt people today

These are nine of the scariest real-life haunted house stories from the creepiest places around the country. Louis is known to be one of the most haunted places in America, due to a tragic history that continues to haunt people today. The 33-room home was built in the 1860s by William Lemp, a successful brewery owner who ended up killing himself in 1904 after the youngest of his four sons, Frederick, died.

From the eerie vestiges of the Sloss Furnaces to the unexplained (and un-booked) performances in the Alabama Theatre and rather otherworldly room service at the Tutwiler Hotel, Birmingham is truly one of the South's supernatural hotbeds. Renowned author and ghost expert Alan Brown delivers a fascinating, downright spine-chilling collection of haunts from around the city and surrounding neighborhoods such as Bessemer, Columbiana, Jasper and Montevallo.

When Alan Brown published his well-received Haunted Places in the American South, a kind of seance swirled around him. Locals who knew ghost stories began haunting him with ghoulish reports from houses, schools, libraries, sanitariums, inns, battlefields, train depots, radio stations, and bridges. Following these leads, he uncovered even more ghost-ridden southern locales.

In Kentucky's White Hall, the ghost of Cassius Clay's first wife Mary Jane roams the upstairs in a black dress, and the night air smells of candle wax, perfume, and bourbon. The spirit of a boy who died in a tragic accident half a century before plagues Mississippi's Cahill Mansion.

Written in the vein of its successful predecessor, Stories from the Haunted South contains fifty-three accounts from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

Balancing the history with the legends of each supernatural locale, Brown focuses on personal stories of ghostly encounters. From folk archives across the South, Brown also includes nearly forgotten legends, such as the Headless Horseman of Hobkirk. With directions to each place, Stories from the Haunted South will be an important addition to the ghostlore of Dixie.

Alan Brown is a professor of English at the University of West Alabama. His books include Haunted Places in the American South and Shadows and Cypress: Southern Ghost Stories (both from University Press of Mississippi).

User reviews
Pipet
I enjoying the book until I got to page 237 when he was talking about the ghosts of Shiloh Battlefield. He describes a particular battle and mentions two generals - General Lew Wallace and General Benjamin Prentiss. He goes on to say, "Wallace was killed, and Prentiss, along with 2100 Union soldiers, from the second and sixth divisions, surrendered." Well, apparently he did not correctly do his research. If he was killed in the Civil War, how did Lew Wallace go on to be the Territorial Governor of New Mexico from 1878-1881 and write "Ben Hur" in 1880? This, then, made me wonder which other facts in the book were incorrect.
Fegelv
This was a gift and I don't know if it has been enjoyable or not.
Dranar
Alan Brown has traveled far and wide to do interviews and research so that he could put together a very interesting collection of Southern ghost stories. I know this because he was kind enough to include a bibliography that not only includes his personal interviews but also his secondary sources. I appreciate this because it lists several books that aren't in my collection and that I never even knew about and which will now swell my wish list.

There are a few problems to be found in this book but overall I enjoyed it very much. There are some typos and a few historical errors that need to be fixed in future editions but they are fairly minor. The biggest problem is to be found in the most promising part of the book. The author gives directions and phone numbers for most of the sites he discusses which is always a plus for me. The directions however are sort of fuzzy and I'm not sure that they would help me locate a site without stopping to ask for directions. I am sure also that many of these places have web sites but Brown for some reason doesn't give them. Having those web addresses would have improved the book quite a bit.

On the positive side the book is fairly well written and it kept my interest although there is not much of a chill factor in the stories. The most attractive aspect of this book is that there are many recent eyewitness accounts included. Some of the events described occurred less than a year before the book was published. I can not overstate how important these recent eyewitness accounts are to the credibility of this type of book and on this point Brown gets an A+. Another plus is that most of the stories to be found here are lesser know stories and not the same old hauntings that one tends to read about in almost every book of this type. I was particularly happy to find the story of the, "Bunnyman Bridge" which I had heard about but had never run across in a book. Now that I have a general idea about where this site is I may just pay it a visit some day. Of course I will probably have to stop and ask for directions because yet again the directions in the book were not too clear.

There is also a good balance between the history of a site and the history of the haunt itself. Often the authors of this type of book get carried away with history and forget the haunt or operate in reverse and give the reader no idea why the place might be haunted. Brown however gets it just about right and seems to provide all of the relevant details.

Overall this is a good book and while it will not scare the reader it will provide a lot of useful information. A superb read for a ghost hunter or ecto-tourist.
Kahavor
I found this book to be a good read and excellent if someone does not want to be "scared". It was a simple overview of hauntings with info about the place and the "legend" of the haunting. As I have read a number of books on hauntings and such, I found this alittle boring. I prefer more personal info on the haunting. I found it alittle too open ended: more of a "well, this is what they say" but I don't think it is true, go see for yourself.