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Free eBook The River Severn: A Journey Following the River from the Estuary to Its Source download

by John Bradford:

Free eBook The River Severn: A Journey Following the River from the Estuary to Its Source download ISBN: 0951948199
Author: John Bradford:
Publisher: Redditch: Hunt End Books, 2004. (2004)
Language: English
Pages: 168
Category: Traveling
Subcategory: Reference
Size MP3: 1121 mb
Size FLAC: 1884 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lit lrf mbr lrf


The River Severn book. This book is the record of a journey in the opposite direction, following the Severn from the M4 bridge over the estuary to the river's source

The River Severn book. This book is the record of a journey in the opposite direction, following the Severn from the M4 bridge over the estuary to the river's source. Various aspects of the scenery are captured in over 200 photographs.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The River Teme: A Journey Following the River from Worcester to Its Source: 1. by. John Bradford.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The River Severn: A Journey Following the River . Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition.

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9781858582733.

A Journey Following the River from the Estuary to Its Source. by John Leslie Bradford. Published 2004 by Hunt End Books in Redditch.

Tyne and Tide: A Celebration of the River Tyne (2003) Bradford, J. The River Severn: A Journey Following the River from the Estuary to its Source (2005) Linton, J. What is Water? The History of a Modern Abstraction (2010). C. The Mighty Severn Bore (1999) Strand 2 Crowe, S. The Landscape of Power (1958) Hannah, L. Electricity before Nationalisation: A Study of the Development of the Electricity Supply Industry in Britain to 1948 (1979) Hennessey, . The Electric Revolution (1972) Hughes, T. Networks of Power: Electrification in Western Society, 1880-1930 (1983) Ingold, T. ‘The Temporality of the Landscape’, World. Archaeology, 25 (1993): 152174.

The River Severn : A Journey Following the River from the Estuary to Its Source. Publication date 30 Apr 2004. Publisher Hunt End Books. Publication City/Country Redditch, United Kingdom. By (author) John Leslie Bradford. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Illustrations note 211 colour photographs.

Britain's longest river begins its journey at a boggy spot just over 1,968ft above sea level on Plynlimon in the .

Britain's longest river begins its journey at a boggy spot just over 1,968ft above sea level on Plynlimon in the Cambrian mountains. The source is marked by two huge wooden posts, one inscribed in Welsh and one in English. From there, it descends into the agricultural valleys of eastern Wales and crosses the Shropshire plain, becoming tidal to the north of Gloucester. Two hundred and twenty miles from its source, the river fans out to form the Severn Estuary before flowing through the Bristol Channel. The Severn's tributaries include the Teme, Stour, Wye, Vyrnwy, Tern and Avon.

The River Severn (Welsh: Afon Hafren) is the longest river in Great Britain at a length of 220 miles (354 km). With an average discharge of 107 m3/s (3,800 cu ft/s) at Apperley, Gloucestershire. With an average discharge of 107 m3/s (3,800 cu ft/s) at Apperley, Gloucestershire, it has by far the greatest water flow in England and Wales.

Textbooks tell us the River Severn is the longest - at 220 miles (354km), and the River Thames slightly shorter at 215 miles (346km) long. But what if the source of the mighty Thames, which snakes its way from Gloucestershire, through south-east England, to London and the Thames Estuary, was in the wrong place on the map? The precise length of a river is not easy to calculate and depends on correctly identifying the source