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Free eBook Professional DotNetNuke 4: Open Source Web Application Framework for ASP.NET 2.0 download

by Joe Brinkman,Scott McCulloch,Chris Paterra,Scott Willhite,Dan Caron,Shaun Walker

Free eBook Professional DotNetNuke 4: Open Source Web Application Framework for ASP.NET 2.0 download ISBN: 0471788163
Author: Joe Brinkman,Scott McCulloch,Chris Paterra,Scott Willhite,Dan Caron,Shaun Walker
Publisher: Wrox; 1 edition (September 16, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 552
Category: Technologies and Future
Subcategory: Web Development and Design
Size MP3: 1473 mb
Size FLAC: 1365 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: doc lrf mobi docx


DotNetNuke is a powerful open source framework that creates and deploys robust modules on the AS. ET . It is also for experienced AS. ET developers who want to use DotNetNuke to build dynamic AS. ET sites or create add-ins to DotNetNuke.

DotNetNuke is a powerful open source framework that creates and deploys robust modules on the AS. ET platform. Wrox Professional guides are planned and written by working programmers to meet the real-world needs of programmers, developers, and IT professionals. Focused and relevant, they address the issues technology professionals face every day. They provide examples, practical solutions, and expert education in new technologies, all designed to help programmers do a better job.

Series: Programmer to Programmer. Author: Shaun Walker, Joe Brinkman, Bruce Hopkins, Scott McCulloch, Chris Paterra, Patrick J. Santry, Scott Willhite, Dan Caron. Year: published in 2006. Summary: Dotnetnuke Is A Powerful Open Source Framework That Creates And Deploys Robust Modules On The As.

DotNetNuke is a powerful open source framework that creates and . The latest features and functionality of DotNetNuke 4 for AS. Written by its core team of developers. Proven tips for managing and administering a DotNetNuke portal. Scott Willhite is an accomplished business and technology professional turned family man. Semi-retired from technology as a profession, his days are spent teaming with his wife Allison as professional Realtors. com) and supporting a variety of community endeavors.

ISBN: 0471788163 EAN: 2147483647. Year: 2006 Pages: 182. Authors: Shaun Walker, Joe Brinkman, Bruce Hopkins, Scott McCulloch, Chris Paterra, Patrick J. Professional DotNetNuke 4: Open Source Web Application Framework for AS. (Programmer to Programmer). ISBN: 0471788163 EAN: 2147483647. CompTIA Project+ Study Guide: Exam PK0-003.

Professional DotNetNuke . : Open Source Web Application Framework for AS. Shaun Walker, Joe Brinkman, Bruce Hopkins, Scott McCulloch, Chris Paterra, Patrick J. 1. 4 Mb. Professional DotNetNuke AS. ET Portals. Shaun Walker, Patrick J. Santry, Joe Brinkman, Daniel Caron, Scott McCulloch, Scott Willhite, Bruce Hopkins. 1 Mb. Category: Computer science

DotNetNuke is a powerful open source framework that creates and deploys robust modules on the AS. ET platform

Professional DotNetNuke . : Open Source Web Application Framework for . Scott has been part of the DotNetNuke community since the project began (late December, 2002). Programmer to Programmer. Shaun Walker, founder and president of Perpetual Motion Interactive Systems In. a solutions company specializing in Microsoft enterprise technologies. Shaun has 15 years professional experience in architecting and implementing large scale IT solutions for private and public organizations. Today, his role within the DotNetNuke team is contributing as an Architect and Core Developer. by Shaun Walker, Scott Willhite, Scott McCulloch, et al. Select Format: Paperback. Select Condition: Like New.

Описание книги Professional DotNetNuke 5: Open Source Web Application Framework for AS. ET:DotNetNuke creator Shaun Walker leads this superlative author team of MVPs while delivering the latest update of a bestseller

Описание книги Professional DotNetNuke 5: Open Source Web Application Framework for AS. ET:DotNetNuke creator Shaun Walker leads this superlative author team of MVPs while delivering the latest update of a bestseller. They offer complete coverage of the major revisions to DotNetNuke 5, such as more granular administration, widgets, XHTML compliance, improved social networking, workflow, and better content management.

DotNetNuke is a powerful open source framework that creates and deploys robust modules on the ASP.NET platform. Written by its core team of developers, this book will provide you with the tools and insight you'll need to install, configure, and develop your own stunning Web applications using DotNetNuke 4.

You'll first gain an inside look into the history of this project as well as the basic operations of a DotNetNuke portal. You'll then find detailed information on how the application is architected and how you can extend it by building modules and skins. With this information, you'll be able to complete projects such as commercial Web sites, corporate intranets and extranets, online publishing portals, and custom vertical applications.

What you will learn from this book

The latest features and functionality of DotNetNuke 4 for ASP.NET 2.0 The best way to install DotNetNuke on the server Proven tips for managing and administering a DotNetNuke portal How to dramatically enhance your Web site's user interface using skins Techniques for extending the portal framework Ways to create a unique look for your porta

Who this book is for

This book is for the nondeveloper or administrator who wants to dive into the exciting DotNetNuke framework. It is also for experienced ASP.NET developers who want to use DotNetNuke to build dynamic ASP.NET sites or create add-ins to DotNetNuke.

Wrox Professional guides are planned and written by working programmers to meet the real-world needs of programmers, developers, and IT professionals. Focused and relevant, they address the issues technology professionals face every day. They provide examples, practical solutions, and expert education in new technologies, all designed to help programmers do a better job.

User reviews
MilsoN
I am very disappointed with this book. As others have said, most of the content is already available on the Net. The install chapter is the same garbage that is in the install doc that you can download from the DNN site (that was last updated in 2006). Even though the title of the book is "Professional DotNetNuke 4.0" the install chapter is heavily focused on version 3. Guess what - if I wanted to know how to install version 3, I would have purchased a book on version 3.

Here is how the version 4 install instructions start: "This section focuses only on the differences between the v3.x and v4.x Install/Source installations. For more detailed instructions, see the appropriate section in the v3.x installation instructions." So you have to read the part about version 4, but are often referred back to the version 3 instructions. This is a book on version 4. It's just pure laziness that the install instructions for version 4 aren't complete.

Do yourself a favor and find a different book.
Rolorel
There isn't much more in this book than is already available for free, to registered users, on the DotNetNuke website. I develop web based applications daily in DNN and barely, if ever, refer to this book. Register for a free account at the DotNetNuke website and consult the free documentation, of which this book is a regurgitation of, along with the forums.
Survivors
Without a doubt the worst technical documentation that I actually had to pay for. This book is one long self-indulgent testament to the developers and the community that has evolved around this product. Good for them, but as a technical manual it fails to deliver in any category: as a User Maunal, Administrative Guide, Programmer's Maunal or even just a Technical Reference. Worse, it hopelessly mixes this different kind of information together at the lowest levels.

Some of the other reviews allude to the high amount of "filler". The truth is though that this book is almost entirely filler; real content is scarce indeed. A staggering 54 pages are devoted to DotNetNuke and Shuan Walker's history when 2 pages would have covered it. Every tech-writer filler trick is used to get the books enormous page count(481). The pages are filled with enormous unannotated screen shots, long tables of program constants with little or no context to properly apply them and that staple of all modern bad programming documentation: extensive unannotated listings of the program's source code.

Save your money and your time on this one.
Cordabor
I was rather dissapointed in this book. The first 7 chapters are either irrelevant to development (please put the historical crap on the web site) or redundant (the installation, overview and admin stuff ARE on the web site). The technical chapters (from 7 on) are good stuff. The one glaringly obvious (at least to me) part that is missing, is a decent deployment technique. I develop web sites and want to be able to move my site from a development environment to a production environment, without having to do it piecemeal. I have still not found a way to do this for DotNetNuke, and I've been digging around for quite a while looking for it. I'd hoped that this book would address this issue. It doesn't.
Kamick
If you are unlucky enough to get tasked with working with this godawful technology, I guess you have one of two options:

1) Buy this book. It's far, far from being comprehensive, but it's enough to keep you treading water for awhile.
2) Get a new job. This is my personal recommendation.
Uickabrod
This book is an indispensable resource in installing and configuring a DotNetNuke installation. The information is clear and easy to follow. My wife who is building her own web site using the application has been using the book to work through development items that were not clear from the application itself.

I am looking forward to using the back sections of the book to develop a couple of modules we will need to complete her web site.
Anaginn
This book is NOT for you if you need to seriously use DotNetNuke or if you are going to embark on custom module development.

This book is definitely for you if you want to know why Shaun Walker and the other core folks made certain decisions from 1.x through 4.x. This is only useful if you have to write a review or report on DotNetNuke for a magazine or blog.

I've been using DotNetNuke seriously since before it was DotNetNuke and I have read all the books written about DotNetNuke through version 4.x. Frustratingly, none of the books gets my recommendation and this particular book is at the bottom. This book is full of general explanations that do you no good if you need to use DotNetNuke.

This book is a shining example of the Achilles heel of DotNetNuke: it's a framework by architects, for architects.

If you want to see what DotNetNuke ought to be more like, get the XMod module (it's a third-party product and I'm not affiliated with it in anyway and I'm not going to give you a link to it, just search for XMod).

XMod is doing what DotNetNuke should be doing because XMod is a user's product. If you don't really want to make your own module or find that the documentation on customizing DNN just does not cut it -- get something like XMod. You'll still be using DotNetNuke but something like XMod is well documented and provides many duplicate features of DNN that accomplish functions similar to DNN but in a much, much more robust and usable way.

In the case of both DNN and XMod the "user" refers to a developer.

Don't let anyone fool you, DNN is a developer's product and you need to know a lot about all the web applicaiton technologies involved and ought to be able to use Visual Studio and SQL at a minimum.

But the nutty thing about this book is that it spends half its time speaking above the developer talking about architectural decisions and other esoterica that will not tell you enough to mimic the architecture or use the code unless you are already a DNN expert developer.

This book will drive you mad if you are a developer who is not afraid to compile a VS project and you are looking for an answer such as, "How do I just add a couple of columns to the Survey module table, a bit of extra business logic and a few cosmetic changes I need?" This book will only reiterate that DNN modules are scattered all over the place in this provider and that or this App_Code folder or that. And that DNN achieves an oh-so-wonderful but madingly obfuscatory 'separation of Church and State' architecture.

The rest of the time this book talks below the developer and gives worthless "For Dummies" information about how to use the various modules like Announcements and Links. For goodness sake Wrox, how in the world did you pass off such a disjoint amalgam of chapters?

DotNetNuke is a very good application framework. Today (Spring 2007) DotNetNuke 4.5 is the best starting point for your web application regardless of size or deployment. DNN blows the LAMP alternatives out of the water.

It remains to be seen if DNN will continue to be needed. My prediciton is "No". DNN is already being absorbed into .NET & Visual Studio and will continue to be absorbed. The only wildcard is the need for Microsoft to present the illusion of "Open Source". It is an illusion because in truth, Microsoft directly funds and virtually controls DotNetNuke. (Sorry, Shaun, it's a fact even you admit in this book. But it's okay with me and most DNN users.)

Even though this book spends and inordinate amount of time explaining "For Dummies" details, it does not provide enough to be useful! For instance, it tells yous about the editor and the discussion module and then promptly dismisses both as inferior to modules you ought to go download. So, you are left on your own to use a module that is not documented.

Trying to develop a custom module in any version of DotNetNuke is not for the uninitiated and chances are you bought this book because you are endeavoring to create a custom module. You would think this book would excel at providing assistance to the custom module developer. But alas it does not.

It is full of "we did this in version 3 because people wanted that in version 2, etc." rather than getting down and dirty into custom module development. Also the examples are incomplete snippets and only in VB.

I will conclude this epistle with a plea to Shaun and the Core: Stop writing books! Instead, provide thorough, updated online documentation, tutorials and private forums. I'd pay way more than the price of this book for a library of sample projects (And please in C#!) with tutorials and explicit instructions. For instance, take Michael Washington's tutorials. I'd pay for access to that type of resource if it were fleshed out a bit more, presented in a more organized fashion and included in-depth documentation and access to private forums to ask questions and get help when deadlines need to be met (on a pay-per-use basis if necessary).

Trying to follow an example in this book will drive you mad because it always leaves out all the REALLY IMPORTANT details like paths, settings, options, creating and configuring IIS for webhost sites versus localhost sites etc. Constantly the book says things like, "If your site is hosted, you'll have to do this part differently." REALLY!? Just HOW is it done differently!? THAT'S WHAT I BOUGHT THE BOOK FOR!

P.S. It is quite evident that few of the Core Team actually use DotNetNuke. The Core really needs to add some serious users to its ranks. Right now it is just a bunch of (very good) system programmers. System programmers we all know are topnotch in their areas of expertise but usually suck at knowing what makes an application a winner with the end users. The upshot is that we who do know the latter end up spending the bulk of our DNN time tweaking under, over and around the ugliness and clumsiness of DNN. This ugly clumsiness can be seen architecturally where too many times, when you need another of something you have to create a new modules and there is no way you (the developer) are going to let end users add modules to pages. So you end up not being able to use a module only because you cannot get "another" one without adding a new module to a page.