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Free eBook The Book of VB .NET: .NET Insight for VB Developers download

by Matthew MacDonald

Free eBook The Book of VB .NET: .NET Insight for VB Developers download ISBN: 1886411824
Author: Matthew MacDonald
Publisher: No Starch Press; 1 edition (February 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 468
Category: Technologies and Future
Subcategory: Programming
Size MP3: 1847 mb
Size FLAC: 1556 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: docx mbr mobi rtf


A complete revision to the highly acclaimed Book of V. ET, the book is organized as a series of lightning tours and real-world examples that show developers the VB 2005 way of doing things.

A complete revision to the highly acclaimed Book of V. Perfect for old-school Visual Basic developers who haven't made the jump t. ET, this book is also useful to developers from other programming backgrounds (like Java) who want to cut to the chase and quickly learn how to program with VB 2005.

Great book for experienced VB developers who don't know. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 17 years ago. The unique cover of this book caught my eye and the excellent writing kept me reading. Experienced VB developers will immediately be thankful to Matthew MacDonald for assuming his audience is VB savvy and in no mood to again be ?introduced? to the concept of the IDE and the If-Then-Else statement. The author begins his book with an introduction of the philosophical differences between the. NET framework and classic Visual Studio. NET terminology and concepts.

The Book of Visual Basic 2005:. NET Insight for Classic VB Developers' by Matthew MacDonald is another fantastic book written by the busy author Matthew MacDonald.

A complete revision to the highly acclaimed "Book of V. ET," the book is organized as a series of lightning tours and real-world examples that show developers the VB 2005 way of doing things. The Book of Visual Basic 2005:.

Professional developers who need to master VB 2005 will want this book by their side. About the author Matthew MacDonald is a developer, author, and educator dedicated to all things Visual Basic and. He’s worked with Visual Basic and ASP since their initial versions, and he has written more than a dozen books, including The Book of V. ET (No Starch Press) and Visual Basic 2005: A Developer’s Notebook (O’Reilly). YOUR PAS S PORT TO THE WORLD O. ET YOUR PAS S PORT TO THE WORLD O. ET ww. ostarch.

If you're from the old school of VB but haven't yet made the jump t. ET, you will be able to make the transition seamlessly. And you won't have to wade through boring, unnecessary material before you get there.

Built on the Microsoft. NET framework, Visual Basic. He's also written a series of books about Matthew MacDonald is a science and technology writer with well over a dozen books to his name. NET allows programmers to create everything from full-featured Internet applications to sophisticated Windows programs with the latest eye- catching interfaces.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. NET Insight for Classic VB Developers. 5 Mb. User Interfaces in C Windows Forms and Custom Controls.

The Book of V. ET is a comprehensive introduction t. ET - introducing the reader to the Visual Studio. ISBN: 1886411824; Издательство: No Starch Press. NET development suite as well as the new generation of Visual Basic. The Book of V. In a series of lightning tours and real-world examples, the book covers topics that relate to Web development, XML, databases, and user interface design. YOUR PASSPORT TO THE WORLD O. ET YOUR PASSPORT TO THE WORLD O. This book uses RepKover-a durable binding that won’t snap shut

Built on the Microsoft .NET framework, Visual Basic .NET allows programmers to create everything from full-featured Internet applications to sophisticated Windows programs with the latest eye- catching interfaces. This comprehensive guide is organized into a series of lightning tours and real- world examples, covering web development, XML, databases, and user interface design. Each chapter begins with an overview of changes from Visual Basic 6. The book also includes extra code examples, references to additional online material, and helpful tips about planning, design, and architecture.

User reviews
Sat
First plus of this book: ONE AUTHOR. Therefore there is a consistent "voice" throughout the book. He writes as though you are having a conversation and explains things in a way that was easy for me (a VB programmer with many years of VB and many more of other xBase languages) to understand. Additionally, when he is explaining a topic and mentions another process that might be new to a VB programmer, he will address that right away. Even if just to say, "by the way, that other thing I mentioned is explained in Chapter 10". My big test for this book was if someone could FINALLY explain "delegates" to me, and he passed with flying stars. I have read two magazine articles and two chapters from other books on this topic and they were like reading physics manuals. So MacDonald has me as a new fan!
Grarana
The unique cover of this book caught my eye and the excellent writing kept me reading.
Experienced VB developers will immediately be thankful to Matthew MacDonald for assuming his audience is VB savvy and in no mood to again be �introduced� to the concept of the IDE and the If-Then-Else statement. The author begins his book with an introduction of the philosophical differences between the .NET framework and classic Visual Studio. He then moves onto .NET terminology and concepts. To his credit, Mr. MacDonald does a good job of addressing the �why� questions one might have of .NET before introducing the �how-to� solutions. Personally, this put me into a .NET comfort zone, which I expect, many .NET first-time users will appreciate. The author intentionally steers away from building useless �Hello World� applications and instead focuses on piecemeal snippets of code that highlight exactly the topic at hand. I�ve purchased many technical books on a variety of subjects and, by far, this one has been the most readable.
In my opinion, this is a must-have for experienced VB programmers who want an introduction to the philosophy, concepts, jargon and syntax of the .NET framework and VB.NET.
Whitegrove
I bought six dot net books and this one is the closest to my heart. I am a powerbuilder programmer with three years of experience and we are moving to asp.net and I did not know visual basic. After reading this book, I think I can handle visual basic 7, which vb.net is, with confidence and hopefuly with ease.
The main strength of this book is the author's indepth understanding of .net and where the platform is comming from. And also his indepth understanding of OO., which is the completely new frame for vb7(vb.net).
Another strength of this book is its 'economy'. Four hundred some pages of 'packed understanding' will make you feel you have very efficiently invested your time.
I will without any qualm recommend this book to any programmer going into .net. It is a jimdandy .net primer of a book.
After reading this book, I also bought "asp.net unleashed" by sams publishing. Which is a very detailed 1400 page book. I still have to hold verdict on that one.
Villo
This book has a very good intention and concept - to introduce VB6 developers to VB .Net. In general it is a very good book. Not very deep, but good enough to start working with VB .Net and bee reasonably productive. So, if not for sloppy writing, I would probably give that book all 5 stars.
What do I mean by sloppy? For once, author uses terms object and class interchangeably throughout the book. Sometimes it is contextually understandable what he means, but often it might be very confusing, especially for people relatively new to OO. Then there are errors and typos in code examples. Some of them are also very confusing. For example: on page 80 author introduces the new VB concept - delegates. For VB6 folks this is something fundamentally new and strange.
In code example author defines delegate type and calls it ProcessFunction. Then he defines variable of this type and calls it ProcessDelegate. After that on the same page he shows how to use delegates and assigns value to ProcessFunction and retrieves value from ProcessFunction.
From the context one should understand that in the last two cases the variable ProcessDelegate should be used instead, and that this is just a typo. Yet, given that VB .Net now supports shared properties and methods, when Class (Type) name can be used where one expects to see Object (Variable), this types of mistakes are very confusing and annoying.
I would not go here into more examples of books imperfections. There are some more. Not terribly many, but enough to frustrate.
Would I recommend this book? Yes, if you have patience and some other VB .Net book to resolve inevitable confusions.
This could become a great book in its next edition if author takes time to make it a bit more accurate and precise.
Jay
I have been programming in VB since 1992 and decided to move to VB.NET when it was released but found the learning curve was immense - until I bought the book of VB.NET. This book is my Bible, it sits besides my computer all the time. Without delving into the VB language, it simplifies the transition to VB.NET for the experienced VB Programmer. It's not for VB learners nor does Matthew propose that it is. If you know VB this is the book to ease the quantam leap from VB to VB.NET - explained in logical steps with excellent examples. I have had to EMail Matthew with a few queries and the response is always prompt and helpful.
There are certainly other books you need in your arsenal - such as Francesco Balena's Microsoft Reference - but this one is a must.
Umge
I'm converting from VB6. I've bought a few books on VB .NET including those by Balena and Connell. This book suits me perfectly. It is very clear, sufficiently comprehensive with a very readable and pleasant style without being patronizing or clever clever. The best introduction to the new IDE I've come across and then it gets even better. I greatly appreciate Matthew MacDonald's obvious expertise and his ability to communicate it. I haven't written many revues but this book deserves one.