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Free eBook Microsoft Visual C# .NET Step by Step--Version 2003 (Step by Step Developer) download

by Jon Jagger,John Sharp

Free eBook Microsoft Visual C# .NET Step by Step--Version 2003 (Step by Step Developer) download ISBN: 0735619093
Author: Jon Jagger,John Sharp
Publisher: Microsoft Press (March 29, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 672
Category: Technologies and Future
Subcategory: Operating Systems
Size MP3: 1328 mb
Size FLAC: 1118 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: docx rtf lit docx


This book does, indeed, take you through C step by step. Usually by opening a file and entering the code.

This book does, indeed, take you through C step by step. It does a farly good job of introducing concepts and showing them in action. My biggest complaint about this book and the vast majority of other programming books that I've encountered is the lack of exercises. It's all well and good to demonstrate a while statement and the data types but just saying, "Type in the following lines", doesn't teach you to write a program.

Build your dexterity with Microsoft Visual C begin writing Microsoft. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work. NET–connected applications-one step at a time! This practical.

Sharp, John, 1964-; Jagger, Jon, 1966-. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

Microsoft Excel 2016 Step by Step is designed for use as a learning and reference resource by home. Microsoft Office Professional 2010 Step by Step eBook. Microsoft® Visual C 2012 Step by Step. 844 Pages·2012·23 MB·13,524 Downloads. places, and AND MICROSOFT VISUAL STUDIO 2012. Microsoft® Visual C 2012 Ste. Microsoft Visual Basic 2013 Step by Step. 83 MB·17,464 Downloads. Compatibility with Earlier Versions of Office Programs 44. Microsoft Office Professional 2010.

John Sharp, Jon Jagger. Build your dexterity with Microsoft Visual C begin writing Microsoft. NET-connected applications-one step at a time! This practical, hands-on tutorial expertly guides you through the fundamentals-from learning Visual C syntax to writing and running your first components, Web services, and applications. Work at your own pace through easy-to-follow lessons and hands-on exercises to teach yourself essential techniques. And stay ahead of the curve by working with real-world examples and best practices for Visual C development.

Code examples in Visual . ET 2003. All the book’s practice files. He is the author of several popular books, including Microsoft Windows® Communication Foundation Step By Step and Microsoft Visual C Step By Step. Jon Jagger is an independent software trainer, designer, and consultant specializing in Visual . ET, C++, Java, C, OO, patterns, design, and general programming. His work on this book also was done through Content Master Ltd. Jon is a . C++ standards panel member and a regular contributor to the ACCU Overload journal. For customers who purchase an ebook version of this title, instructions for downloading the CD files can be found in the ebook. About the Author: Jon Jagger is an independent software trainer, designer, and consultant specializing in Visual .

Microsoft Visual . ET Step by Step-Version 2003.

Are you sure you want to remove Microsoft Visual . ET Step by Step-Version 2003 from your list? Microsoft Visual .

Build your dexterity with Microsoft Visual C#—and begin writing Microsoft .NET–connected applications—one step at a time! This practical, hands-on tutorial expertly guides you through the fundamentals—from learning Visual C# syntax to writing and running your first components, Web services, and applications. Work at your own pace through easy-to-follow lessons and hands-on exercises to teach yourself essential techniques. And stay ahead of the curve by working with real-world examples and best practices for Visual C# development.

Discover how to:

Declare variables, define methods, and construct statements Handle and trap exceptions Use object-oriented techniques, such as inheritance and encapsulation Manage resources and use the garbage collector Build components, including properties, indexers, and events Define operators to enhance class usability Create GUI components and user controls Access data sources using Microsoft ADO.NET Write and manipulate XML documents Construct Web Forms that display large volumes of data Validate user input with Microsoft ASP.NET controls Write, test, and deploy Web services

CD features:

Code examples in Visual C# .NET 2003 All the book’s practice files Fully searchable eBook

For customers who purchase an ebook version of this title, instructions for downloading the CD files can be found in the ebook.

User reviews
Gaudiker
Granted, it probably helps if you're migrating from another language (like I was - from VB), but it's an excellent text which gives you plenty of background & extra information, then takes you into step-by-step exercises to reinforce what you just read. This methodology really worked for me, and I highly recommend this book. Initially, I was concerned that it was going to be literally just step-by-step instructions on how to use C# and Visual Studio .NET, but the information between the exercises, plus additional notes and best practices really helped me out with learning the language and some potential gotchas.
Akinonris
This book is detail oriented, and goes into some depth into the structure and capablities of the language.Overall it is well organized and focused with little fluff, and does touch on relavant topics. However, there is little in the way of the 'hands on' projects that can be found in a tutorial or most college textbooks..I found this aspect annoying since this is the primary way I learn. Ultimatley, I will end up using it for a referance
komandante
I had received my book just in time. The material is pretty good. I'm a C#.NET beginner and I have to create a new tracking application for my job on my own. My team is pretty busy and this book is helping me out a lot.
Simple
decent book
Beabandis
The problem with C# is that it is a product created by Microsoft solely for Microsoft's programming environment (Visual Studio .Net and SQL Server 2005) and hence is really of no use to anyone who is interested in LEARNING the FUNDAMENTALS of programming. C# programming can really ONLY take place in a Visual Studio .Net IDE and thus - unlike platform and IDE independent Java, C++, and C - has not been adopted by the academic community. College textbooks on programming tend to focus (almost exclusively) on Java, C, and C++. Please see any textbook by Walter Savitch or Cay Horstmann to learn the fundamentals of programming. As someone with basic programming skills you would then be ready for this book. But this is not a book to learn how to program. That being said this is an excellent introduction to the Visual Studio .Net IDE.
Samulkree
Coming from a VB background I chose two books to step up to C#. The first was Charles Petzolds excellent book, programming in the key of C#. My second book was this one. While this fills in many holes left out of Petzolds book, (mainly to do with the .NET framework & the .NET IDE, since Petzold deals purely with the C# language) it does so at the expense of clarity & in depth explanations as to `why' we do certain things. Often this book uses explanations dealing with as yet explained methods or objects, hence its flow is not contiguous, & the information supplied shallow. Had I not first worked through the `Key of C#' book, I would have been left scratching my head with this one. As in one example, it uses the conditional ternary operator statement having not yet explained this simple yet enigmatic little piece of code. (Fortunately I'd learnt this in the previous book). At other times, it gives examples that don't result in anything of value as code methodology. In another example the authors declare a property as 'money' without any prior indication of creating a money class, which led me to search MSDN online documentation for a non existent money data type that i may have overlooked. Not good. They have a skill of muddying simple concepts with overly complex examples. I came away thinking this book would be more for the experienced C++ developer, however, it doesn't really supply any ground breaking information on C# or its framework; it only skims over what could be discovered by yourself with a bit of exploration.
As I said originally, it does serve to fill in some gaps left out by other books, but I would steer away from this book if you are a beginner or even new to OOP. Another thing that in fact annoyed me about this book was its false claim that the .NET guidelines recommend against ANY use of Hungarian Notation at all. In fact the guidelines only recommend against using hn for exposed members. Private variables are still up to the team to decide upon. This was personal point of view & not related to true recommendations.

This book may better well serve as a reference but definitely not as a step by step beginner's book. It will leave you with more questions than answers. I would go for a book more dedicated to a particular facet of .NET, rather than this `all in one' step by step. For that reason, I'd probably choose Petzolds if you're looking to learn the C# `language', (It is also an excellent start in learning about OOP, though it doesn't touch upon Interfaces). There are also other excellent books on OOP, ADO & the .NET framework.

The style of this book leads me to believe it was written with the C++/Java developer in mind who want a quick jump to C#, rather than the VB developer who needs to adapt to the new framework. I'd only buy it if what you're looking for is a brief overview of the lot.
Gavirus
If you are already familiar with C++ and/or Java, this book is most likely too basic for an introduction to C#. I have been using "Microsoft Visual C# .NET Step by Step--Version 2003" by Jon Jagger for about 2.5 months now and the level of information feels like a first course in compsci (title is "Step by Step" - suppose that makes sense). There are (very important) details in Visual Studio, such as defining references and dependencies, that are not covered. In addition, the section on Windows Forms is rather weak. Most Windows applications have multiple controls and forms and the important mechanisms to allow communication between multple controls and forms is not mentioned. Despite the shortcomings, it is useful to at least see the concepts in the book and have some idea of the meaning. I was rusty on C/C++ and this book did serve as a nice refresher to object oriented programming. In summary, an basic/adaquate introduction to C# suitable for object oriented programming beginners- it holds true to the "Step by Step" name. For more information regarding Windows forms and controls, seek out another more detailed C# book.