» » Physics for Game Developers

Free eBook Physics for Game Developers download

by David M Bourg

Free eBook Physics for Game Developers download ISBN: 0596000065
Author: David M Bourg
Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (November 15, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 336
Category: Technologies and Future
Subcategory: Operating Systems
Size MP3: 1328 mb
Size FLAC: 1110 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: mobi lrf docx lrf


Physics for Game Developers serves as the starting point for enriching games with physics-based realism.

Physics for Game Developers serves as the starting point for enriching games with physics-based realism. Part two applies these concepts to specific real-world problems, such as projectiles, boats, airplanes, and cars. Part three introduces real-time simulations and shows how they apply to computer games.

Aimed at the game developer or student/hobbyist interested in physics, Physics for Game Developers . David Bourg is a Naval Architect involved in various military and commercial proposal, design, and construction efforts.

While this authoritative guide isn't for the math-averse, the author's clear presentation and obvious enthusiasm for his subject help make this book a compelling choice for anyone faced with adding realistic motion to computer games or simulations. For many chapters, Bourg then presents Windows-based DirectX programs in C++ to illustrate key concepts

Physics for Game Developers serves as the starting point for enriching games with physics-based realism. For many chapters, Bourg then presents Windows-based DirectX programs in C++ to illustrate key concepts. For example, you can experiment with different parameters to view a cannonball's path.

Physics for Game Developers serves as the starting point for those who want to enrich games with .

Physics for Game Developers serves as the starting point for those who want to enrich games with physics-based realism. As a naval architect and marine engineer, David M. Bourg performs computer simulations and develops analysis tools that measure such things as hovercraft performance and the effect of waves on the motion of ships and boats.

Physics for Game Developers book. The first five chapters of the book will kill you if you're not familiar David M. Bourg, Physics for Game Developers (O'Reilly, 2002)

Physics for Game Developers book. Colliding billiard balls. Missile trajectories. Bourg, Physics for Game Developers (O'Reilly, 2002). It seems to me that when you're confronted with a book title like Physics for Game Developers, you see an undercurrent of rocks for jocks in that. It implies that this is physics for folks who never glommed onto physics. As someone who never got above a C in any science class after Biology I in tenth grade, then, it would seem to be right up my alley.

Physics for Game Developers. You’ll learn about collisions, explosions, sound, projectiles, and other effects used in games on Wii, PlayStation, Xbox, smartphones, and tablets. You’ll also get a handle on how to take advantage of various sensors such as accelerometers and optical tracking devices. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

David M. Bourg, Kenneth Humphreys. You'll learn about collisions,. You'll learn about collisions, explosions, sound, projectiles, and other effects used in games on Wii, PlayStation, Xbox, smartphones, and tablets. You'll also get a handle on how to take advantage of various sensors such as accelerometers and optical tracking devices. Authors David Bourg and Bryan Bywalec show you how to develop your own solutions to a variety of problems.

by David M. Bourg and Bryan Bywalec. As a game developer, and very likely as a gamer yourself, you’ve seen products being advertised as ultra-realistic, or as using real-world physics. At the same time you, or perhaps your company’s marketing department, are wondering how you can spice up your own games with such realism.

Colliding billiard balls. Missile trajectories. Cornering dynamics in speeding cars. By applying the laws of physics, you can realistically model nearly everything in games that bounces around, flies, rolls, slides, or isn't sitting still, to create compelling, believable content for computer games, simulations, and animation. Physics for Game Developers serves as the starting point for those who want to enrich games with physics-based realism.Part one is a mechanics primer that reviews basic concepts and addresses aspects of rigid body dynamics, including kinematics, force, and kinetics. Part two applies these concepts to specific real-world problems, such as projectiles, boats, airplanes, and cars. Part three introduces real-time simulations and shows how they apply to computer games. Many specific game elements stand to benefit from the use of real physics, including:

The trajectory of rockets and missiles, including the effects of fuel burn offThe collision of objects such as billiard ballsThe stability of cars racing around tight curvesThe dynamics of boats and other waterborne vehiclesThe flight path of a baseball after being struck by a batThe flight characteristics of airplanesYou don't need to be a physics expert to learn from Physics for Game Developers, but the author does assume you know basic college-level classical physics. You should also be proficient in trigonometry, vector and matrix math (reference formulas and identities are included in the appendixes), and college-level calculus, including integration and differentiation of explicit functions. Although the thrust of the book involves physics principles and algorithms, it should be noted that the examples are written in standard C and use Windows API functions.
User reviews
Atineda
David M. Bourg, Physics for Game Developers (O'Reilly, 2002)

It seems to me that when you're confronted with a book title like Physics for Game Developers, you see an undercurrent of "rocks for jocks" in that. It implies that this is physics for folks who never glommed onto physics. As someone who never got above a C in any science class after Biology I in tenth grade, then, it would seem to be right up my alley. Not so. The first five chapters of the book will kill you if you're not familiar with various forms of scientific notation. (Know your Greek letters!) It doesn't help that Bourg has overloaded a few common operators for his own means (for example, he uses * for dot product and ^ for conjunction, when coders will be used to seeing those to symbols used for multiplication and exponentiation respectively). That said, however, once you get past the first five "refresher" chapters, the book picks up a good deal. There's code! And once Bourg is describing what code does, rather than attempting to impart more abstract (well, okay, "abstract" is not the right word, but hopefully you know what I'm getting at), his language becomes a great deal clearer, at least to those of us who think in code rather than physics. Worth picking up if you're in the market for this sort of book, but you might want to pick up a copy of Physics for Dummies to help you through the first part. ***
Dibei
If you wish to add more realistic environment interaction or object behavior to your games, you will benefit from this book. This book is much better for beginners than more recent books on the subject that maybe talk in more detail about game physics, but do so from the standpoint of some specific physics engine that the author has put together. I have personally lifted several pieces of code from this book, adapted them to Java, and placed them in a multimedia application I have been writing with no trouble. The book goes over the basics of adapting Newtonian physics to games, and then uses these ideas to set up the motion of simple projectiles, cars, hovercraft, and ships. 3D issues are also discussed at length.
To be sure, you do not need to be a physics expert to learn something from this book, but it is assumed that you have a basic level of understanding of classical physics. Anyone who has taken high school or college level physics should have no trouble understanding the material. You should also be proficient in trigonometry and vector and matrix mathematics. Certain topics in calculus are also discussed, so some degree of familiarity would be useful, but is not required. However, a strong C++ programming background is required if you are to tackle integration of a physics system into your existing game engine. This book is a great starting point for readers who aspire to understand "Game Physics" by Eberly, which is far more advanced and academic in tone.
I shall talk about the details of the book in the context of its table of contents:
PART 1 - MECHANICS PRIMER
This consists of chapters 1 through 5 and starts out with simple concepts such as Newton's laws and builds up until you get to rigid body dynamics. If you are already are up to speed on mechanics, you can skip these chapters.
PART 2 - REAL-WORLD EXAMPLES
Chapters 6 through 10 focus on modeling so that you have a solid understanding of the nature of certain physical systems. The craft selected were chosen because they best illustrate the specific physical phenomenon and concepts that are relevant to a wide variety of problems. The systems modeled are projectiles, aircraft, ships, hovercraft, and automobiles.
PART 3 - REAL-TIME SIMULATION
This field is discussed as it applies to games in chapters 11 through 17. These chapters focus on the fundamentals by walking through the development of the 2D simulation of hovercraft, a 3D flight simulation, a generic multibody simulation in 3D with collision response, and a simulation of cloth using particles and springs.
The appendices show implementations in C++ of classes for vector operations, matrix operations, and quaternion operations. The book's bibliography provides information sources for mechanics, mathematics, and specific technical subjects such as aerodynamics. All of the code for the book can be downloaded from the book's website at O'Reilly and Associates. I highly recommend this fun and comprehensive book for anyone getting started in adding physics to game programs.
Arashilkis
Wonderful book for developers just starting out that have no idea what they're doing.
Narder
While the book has some value (primarily owing to its choice of topic and introductory level), the impact it might have is greatly reduced by its examples reliance on non-metric units -- and a variety of dissimilar choices at that. It makes as much sense as using EBCDIC in your examples in a work on text processing. The result is that the examples suffer a loss of literal value if you wanted to quickly transplant them into a project that has the good sense to use metric measures to avoid confusion over unit conversions.
Secondly, the code examples are sparsely documented. This causes trouble if one wants to transcode one into another language (as I did in taking the flag simulation to Java). One is reduced to blinking and trying to figure out whether the first or second dimension of an array in the author's example corresponds to the flag's height along the pole or its "fly". He's presented a lot in this code, and there are so few comments in it to clarify the arbitrary choices within that a great benefit would have been realized had he added a few. Even had they been taken from the text of the chapter, they would have produced a more valuable result.
I would love to see Mr Bourg attempt a second edition that attended to some of these needless editorial choices.