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Free eBook Kasparov and Deep Blue: The Historic Chess Match Between Man and Machine download

by Bruce Pandolfini

Free eBook Kasparov and Deep Blue: The Historic Chess Match Between Man and Machine download ISBN: 068484852X
Author: Bruce Pandolfini
Publisher: Touchstone; Original ed. edition (October 16, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 176
Category: Technologies and Future
Subcategory: Computer Science
Size MP3: 1613 mb
Size FLAC: 1178 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: lrf doc txt docx


The book also ponders the history and future of artificial intelligence and questions what caused Kasparov's defeat. Bruce Pandolfini, a National Master in . chess competition, is the creator of the highly acclaimed Fireside Chess Library.

Kasparov and Deep Blue book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Kasparov and Deep Blue book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Kasparov and Deep Blue: The Historic Chess Match Between Man and Machine as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Bruce Pandolfini does an excellent job taking you step-by-step through the games between Kasparov and Deep Blue. This is a great book for the beginner or intermediate player. It shows what goes on in a Grandmaster's mind when playing. I wish he wrote more about Deep Blue itself, but he actually said very little about it. Popular Categories.

In the first comprehensive book about the highly publicized chess match between world champion Garry Kasparov and the IBM chess program Deep Blue, renowned chess teacher and author Bruce Pandolfini offers a play-by-play of each game-as well as his own unique analysis an. .

In the first comprehensive book about the highly publicized chess match between world champion Garry Kasparov and the IBM chess program Deep Blue, renowned chess teacher and author Bruce Pandolfini offers a play-by-play of each game-as well as his own unique analysis and historical perspective.

Bruce Pandolfini (born September 17, 1947) is an American chess author, teacher, and coach. 1997 Kasparov and Deep Blue: The Historic Chess Match Between Man and Machine (Fireside Chess Library). A USCF national master, he is generally considered to be America's most experienced chess teacher. As a coach and trainer, Pandolfini has possibly conducted more chess sessions than anyone in the world. By the summer of 2015 he had given an estimated 25,000 private and group lessons. 1998 The Winning Way (Fireside Chess Library). 2003 Pandolfini's Ultimate Guide to Chess (Fireside Chess Library).

Kasparov and Deep Blue : The Historic Chess Match Between Man and Machine, Paperback by Pandolfini, Bruce, ISBN 068484852X, ISBN-13 9780684848525, Brand New, Free P&P in the UK Follows the historical chess tournament between world chess champion Garry Kasparov and the chess program Deep Blue, in a game-by-game, play-by-play analysis. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 4 brand new listings. Kasparov and Deep Blue: The Historic Chess Match Between Man and Machine by Bruce Pandolfini (Paperback, 1997). Brand new: lowest price.

In the first comprehensive book about the highly publicized chess match between world champion Garry Kasparov and the IBM .

In the first comprehensive book about the highly publicized chess match between world champion Garry Kasparov and the IBM chess program Deep Blue, renowned chess teacher and author Bruce Pandolfini offers a playbyplay of each gameas well as his own unique analysis and historical perspective. Author(s) :Bruce Pandolfini (1997).

The book also ponders the history and future of artificial intelligence and questions what caused Kasparov's defeat. Country of Publication.

The two matches between IBM’s Deep Blue and World Champion Garry Kasparov were the culmination of the dream of machines mastering chess, a game once (and perhaps still) considered a touchstone of the intellect

The two matches between IBM’s Deep Blue and World Champion Garry Kasparov were the culmination of the dream of machines mastering chess, a game once (and perhaps still) considered a touchstone of the intellect. A key man in that quest was British mathematician Alan Turin, who published the first chess-playing program (on paper) in 1951. The newly released film The Imitation Game should boost Turin’s reputation yet further, with Dominic Lawson entitling an article in the popular UK listings magazine Radio Times: Benedict Cumberbatch and The Imitation Game will turn chess geeks into heroes.

Follows the historical chess tournament between world chess champion Garry Kasparov and the chess program Deep Blue, in a game-by-game, play-by-play analysis
User reviews
White_Nigga
While I don't really care for the annotation by the author,the games are on other pages without the beginners annotation, so I would still give her 5 stars because thats all I wanted in the first place.
Rias
A great chess book. Pandolfini explains each move of every game in terms that an inexperienced chess player can understand.
Getaianne
Bruce wrote this book to capitalize on the publicity surrounding the Man vs. Machine match. I have no problem with that. It was certainly front-page news in the late 90s. But apparently he (or the publisher) was uncertain about the book's possible audience. On one hand, it's clearly for non chess players (witness the three-page-long How to Read Chess Moves, not to mention the boxed comments found throughout; e.g., a pinned piece can't run away; even the following gem which appears as late as page 153: "The tricky but timely castling move, where you get to move two pieces on the same turn, and it's not considered cheating."). On the other hand, I'm not sure that even beginner chess players would want the move-by-move analysis which is provided for the six games. I don't think it's a bad book, but trying to appeal to multiple crowds may not be a winnable scenario.

Also missing was some historical background on chess-playing computers, or even on GM Kasparov for that matter. And while I imagine most people know the outcome, the review blurb at the top of the front cover constitutes a blatant spoiler.
grand star
Kasparov and Deep Blue, by Bruce Pandolfini, is an excellent account of the historic rematch between the world's highest rated chess player Garry Kasparov and IBM's new and improved chess supercomputer--Deep Blue. Pandolfini does an excellent job of analyzing the individual games move by move while simultaneously teaching the reader about the fundamentals of chess strategy. The book is well organized. Pandolfini begins each chapter with a complete move list for the game under review, followed by clear and concise analysis of each move. In addition, the author includes several mini-essays that discuss general points of chess strategy. These mini-essays provide the reader with a refreshing break from action and are highly instructive. The best part about this chess book is that Pandolfini is cognizant of his audience. Anybody who reads chess books is familiar with the sometimes overwhelming inclusion of detailed hypothetical move variations that necessarily acompany a good analysis of a particular move. However, Pandolfini wrote this book for the beginer to intermediate level chess player, and as such, limits the frequency of confusing hypothetical move variations to instances where they are both necessary and instructive. In all, a highly enjoyable read for anybody interested in chess or computers--or both!
Ffleg
This book contains the complete games of both Kasparov-Deep Blue matches in a compact and affordable volume, which makes it a good value for its price for anybody interested in these matches. Pandolfini does a reasonable job picking positions to diagram. However, at least to me as a reasonably experienced, if mediocre, chess player, the author's analysis was entirely worthless.
Clearly, Pandolfiini's intention was to use this high profile match to teach some general principles of chess to an inexperienced public. I'm not sure this is a viable strategy, given at what high level the games were played, but there is nothing wrong with the principles the author teaches. However, In his attempt to cater to the chess novice, Pandolfini goes overboard in avoiding the discussion of any but the most obvious lines. As a result, the somewhat more experienced reader is left without help to the somewhat less obvious questions.
As a glaring example of this, it would have been well worth a discussion, giving specific lines, why the black position at the end of game 6 is indeed lost. Instead, Pandolfiini just states some generalities ("Time to buy IBM stock").
Furthermore, the book is utterly disappointing in its failure to provide any substantial information at all about the technology behind Deep Blue, instead of the clichés that the author seems to find amusing.
Hiclerlsi
At first I planned to buy this book and Keene's book on the first match. Somehow I could not get myself to buy them. Then after reading all the reviews for this book, I agreed with most of the comments.
1) For a book of six annotated games, the full retail price is too high.
2) Some reviewers said the book is too shallow. When I read this book the fourth time at a library, I liked and enjoyed it. Lots of explaination. Now after reading the reviews here I agree that Pando's analyses are one-dimensional and not deep enough, like Nunn's or Yermo's. (Thank you, other reviewers, for pointing out that my chess experience is shallow as well; and help me to save $$$. Lots of chess to learn for me.)
This book is good as a teaching tool for 1400's, the price is not reasonable. Used book's price is a better investment. $9.99 is a reasonable price for a new one. Used ones, get the best price as you can here...