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Free eBook Kingdom of Children: Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement. download

by Mitchell Stevens

Free eBook Kingdom of Children: Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement. download ISBN: 0691058180
Author: Mitchell Stevens
Publisher: Princeton University Press; First Printing edition (September 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 238
Category: Teaching and Education
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching
Size MP3: 1301 mb
Size FLAC: 1107 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: azw doc doc docx


Mitchell L. Stevens’s Kingdom of Children. stands to fill an important void as home schoolers and their organizations. Fundamentally, the book is an analysis of home schoolers’ organizations. Stevens begins by arguing that home schooling is, in short, a social

Mitchell L. have been slighted by both sociologists and social-movement scholars. This book is extremely well written and thought provoking. Stevens begins by arguing that home schooling is, in short, a social. movement, with a rich history and an elaborate organizational apparatus. p. 4). Stevens’s organizational analysis and interviews support the idea. that there are essentially two groups of home schoolers.

Kingdom of Children offers a rich study of the homeschooling movement Stevens is an academic but treats both secular and Christian homeschooling (and everything in between) with an objective and sincere balance.

Kingdom of Children offers a rich study of the homeschooling movement. Stevens is an academic but treats both secular and Christian homeschooling (and everything in between) with an objective and sincere balance. I also recommend this book to homeschool families who wish to see an overview of the wider history and context of homeschooling. It is not a how to book, though.

Kingdom of Children book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Kingdom of Children: Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Xiii, 228 pages ; 24 cm. More than one million American children are schooled by their parents. As their ranks grow, home schoolers are making headlines by winning national spelling bees and excelling at elite universities. The few studies conducted. Yet we still know little about this alternative to one of society's most fundamental institutions. Mitchell Stevens goes behind the scenes of the homeschool movement.

Homeschooling, also known as home education, is the education of children at home or a variety of places other than school. Home education is usually conducted by a parent, tutor, or an online teacher. Many families use less formal ways of educating. Homeschooling" is the term commonly used in North America, whereas "home education" is commonly used in the United Kingdom, Europe, and in many Commonwealth countries.

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Mitchell Stevens goes behind the scenes of the homeschool movement

Mitchell Stevens goes behind the scenes of the homeschool movement. What he finds are two very different kinds of home education-one rooted in the liberal alternative school movement of the 1960s and 1970s and one stemming from the Christian day school movement of the same era. Stevens explains how this dual history shapes the meaning and practice of home schooling today. In the process, he introduces us to an unlikely mix of parents and notes the core values on which they agree: the sanctity of childhood and the primacy of family in the face of a highly competitive, bureaucratized society.

More than one million American children are schooled by their parents. of Children : Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement.

book by Mitchell L. Kingdom of Children : Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement.

More than one million American children are schooled by their parents. As their ranks grow, home schoolers are making headlines by winning national spelling bees and excelling at elite universities. The few studies conducted suggest that homeschooled children are academically successful and remarkably well socialized. Yet we still know little about this alternative to one of society's most fundamental institutions. Beyond a vague notion of children reading around the kitchen table, we don't know what home schooling looks like from the inside.

Sociologist Mitchell Stevens goes behind the scenes of the homeschool movement and into the homes and meetings of home schoolers. What he finds are two very different kinds of home education--one rooted in the liberal alternative school movement of the 1960s and 1970s and one stemming from the Christian day school movement of the same era. Stevens explains how this dual history shapes the meaning and practice of home schooling today. In the process, he introduces us to an unlikely mix of parents (including fundamentalist Protestants, pagans, naturalists, and educational radicals) and notes the core values on which they agree: the sanctity of childhood and the primacy of family in the face of a highly competitive, bureaucratized society.

Kingdom of Children aptly places home schoolers within longer traditions of American social activism. It reveals that home schooling is not a random collection of individuals but an elaborate social movement with its own celebrities, networks, and characteristic lifeways. Stevens shows how home schoolers have built their philosophical and religious convictions into the practical structure of the cause, and documents the political consequences of their success at doing so.

Ultimately, the history of home schooling serves as a parable about the organizational strategies of the progressive left and the religious right since the 1960s.Kingdom of Children shows what happens when progressive ideals meet conventional politics, demonstrates the extraordinary political capacity of conservative Protestantism, and explains the subtle ways in which cultural sensibility shapes social movement outcomes more generally.

User reviews
Kecq
If you're interested in pretty much THE book on homeschooling in the US, this is a good place to start. Very readable and thoughtful. Stevens is an academic but treats both secular and Christian homeschooling (and everything in between) with an objective and sincere balance.

I also recommend this book to homeschool families who wish to see an overview of the wider history and context of homeschooling. It is not a how to book, though.
Nikobar
The Mitchell Stevens does a great job of accurately representing the two broadest classifications of homeschoolers. As someone who lives in the county with the highest homeschool population (13,000+) I can tell you every homeschooler I ever met was accurately represented in this book.

I am a conservative Christian (what the author labels "Godly Women") but I practice Attachment Parenting (what the author labeled "Natural Mother"). I spend a lot of time and know lots of people in both camps, and I can tell you the author did an outstanding job of respectfully explaining them. He also explains how the different philosophies/world views have led to legislative and media domination by the conservative Christian homeschool organizations. With that knowledge new homeschools are given insight to as to the cultural divisions in open vs. closed support groups. Being familiar with both cultures can help avoid unnecessary conflict.

This book covers the first wave of homeschoolers. There are essentially 3. I Saw the Angel in the Marble by Chris and Ellyn Davis covers all 3 in one of the essays. It is an excellent companion book to Kingdom of Children. It covers the roughly 6 different ways people homeschool, the 4 different subcultures homeschoolers fall into, and the chronology of the 3 waves of homeschooling.

The Davises call the first wave "Pioneers"- people who were not happy with institutional settings for religious or philosophical reasons. They emerged throughout the 1980s. That's who Kingdom of Children is about.

The second wave are called "Settlers"- people who are not categorically opposed to institutions, but are enjoying the academic excellence and flexible lifestyle that homeschooling affords. They showed up in the early 1990s after the test scores of pioneer kids were widely publicized.

In the late 1990s and after the turn of the new century the flood gates opened and group 3 known as "Refugees" poured in. They are fleeing a failed system and are unable to access a private school of their liking. They are probably the fastest growing group where I live. They are not steeped in homeschool philosophy, and usually mimic school at home. (They are also called "school at homers" instead of homeschoolers by current Pioneers and some of today's Settlers.)

SPOILER ALERT!

I was surprised Kingdom of Children let the cat out of the bag. The author's observations led him to the conclusion that women homeschool. No matter what camp they are in, no matter what they say about biblical hierarchy, in the end women develop the educational philosophy and research materials and do the work of teaching. Women set up support groups, networks, and enrichment activities. They also handle the lion share of the child rearing and household management at the same time. There are books and convention workshops that tout the idea of father significantly participating in and overseeing the process. How can they? They are working so hard to provide for us so we can enjoy the amazing and challenging experience of being a homeschool mom, it leaves little time for hands on instruction by dads. We're so appreciative that they do. Anyone considering this lifestyle needs to be ware of that reality.

Dads-read Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling Mom by Todd Wilson. Your wife will be soooo glad you did!
Morad
A comprehensive long-term research study on homeschooling. It has been very helpful in preparing to write my dissertation!
Diredefender
This book is an excellent introduction into home schooling today. As a home school graduate I think he captured much of the spirit of the movement today. However, he misses one point. He looks to Holt as the beginning of the movement. His bias towards the secular home schoolers blinds him to the private school movement that led to Christian home schools. The exodus of the Christians started during the time that Holt was writing. Thus, both movements were happening around the same time. He misses the fact that Christians such as R. J. Rushdoony were writing before Holt on the need to leave the public schools. Thus, the Christians were seeing the danger in the schools at the same time if not before the secular crowd. The Christians did not hijack a secular movement.
Mezilabar
Dr. Stevens' book is a fascinating look at the contrasts between conservative Protestants who homeschool for religious reasons and secular "unschoolers". He does an excellent job discussing how these differing motivations affect how individual families educate their children and also how they affect organizations providing support to and advocacy for homeschoolers.

The major criticism I have of Dr. Stevens' work is that he completely missed the third type of homeschoolers: those who homeschool for academic reasons. Folks like me who aren't looking to Mary Pride or John Holt for inspiration but to authors like Susan Wise Bauer and Mortimer J. Adler. Our problem with traditional schools isn't that we think they're "ungodly" or not crunchy enough but rather that they've been "dumbed down" in recent years. We want rigorous math; explicit teaching of phonics, spelling rules, and grammar; classical languages like Latin and/or Greek; studying the history and literature of our Western Civilization heritage; and so on. There are lots of us out there in the homeschool community- why are we nowhere to be seen in Dr. Stevens' book?