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Free eBook The Feel-Good Curriculum: The Dumbing Down Of America's Kids In The Name Of Self-esteem download

by Maureen Stout Ph.D.,Maureen Stout

Free eBook The Feel-Good Curriculum: The Dumbing Down Of America's Kids In The Name Of Self-esteem download ISBN: 0738204358
Author: Maureen Stout Ph.D.,Maureen Stout
Publisher: Da Capo Lifelong Books (January 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 336
Category: Teaching and Education
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching
Size MP3: 1896 mb
Size FLAC: 1352 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: mobi mbr rtf lit


Maureen Stout's book, "The Feel-Good Curriculum," would make a good companion to the works of ED Hirsch .

Maureen Stout's book, "The Feel-Good Curriculum," would make a good companion to the works of ED Hirsch, author of "The Knowledge Deficit. These two authors' theses are much the same: over the past forty-or-so years, the "progressive" changes in American education have led to the decline of academic standards, the over-valuing of (a misguided view of) self-esteem, and and the turning out of students ill-prepared for the disciplined nature of the "real world.

A scathing critique of the self-esteem movement in American public education, complete with practical solutions to counter its ill effects. The so-called "self-esteem movement"-a progressive, child-centered, discovery model of schooling-has transformed schools into therapeutic clinics and teachers into counselors, creating a generation of righteous, entitled, underachieving children. Professor Stout urges us to replace our coddling, indulgent approach to building self-esteem in children with a sense of authentic self-confidence developed from intellectual, physical, and moral effort and achievement.

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Includes bibliographical references (p. 283-299) and index. Introduction: The false prophet of self-esteem - Part I. Creating a culture of therapy: How we got here from there. What is school for, anyway? -. - Inside the Ed School: The politics of teacher education - What's so progressive about this: Child-centered education and the transformation of the American public school - Part II. Therapy nation: Culture and schooling in contemporary America. The rake's progress: Self-esteem takes over - Nothing more than feelings: The naked truth about self-esteem - Practicing self-esteem: Magic, myths, and masquerades - Part III. Challenging the consequences.

Maureen Stout isn't the first to attack self-esteem boosters in public schools, and she won't be the last.

Maureen Stout P. Printed in the United States of America 2 THE FEEL-GOOD CURRICULUM ited considerable surprise when they.

A scathing critique of the self-esteem movement in American public education, complete with practical solutions to counter its ill effects. Printed in the United States of America. by corporations, institutions, and other organizations.

The Feel-Good Curriculum: The Dumbing Down of America's Kids in the Name of Self-Esteem. The feel-good curriculum: the dumbing-down of America's kids in the name of self-esteem. 6 Mb. Category: M Mathematics, MPop Popular-level.

Author: Maureen Stout P.

The feel-good curriculum. the dumbing-down of America's kids in the name of self-esteem. Too many degrees of separation: Self-esteem and the death of community. The return of ethics in education: Answering emotivism. Back to the future: From cynicism to skepticism and hope. by Maureen Stout, P. Published 2000 by Perseus Books in Cambridge, Mass. Epilogue: Education for a new millennium.

The so-called self-esteem movement-a progressive, child-centered, discovery model of schooling-has transformed schools into therapeutic clinics and teachers into counselors, creating a generation of entitled, righteous, underachieving children. An insider's account of the pernicious aspects of this seemingly well-meaning movement, The Feel-Good Curriculum provides devastating evidence that our belief in the power and importance of self-esteem in education is misplaced and without basis.Avoiding political posturing and political correctness, The Feel-Good Curriculum identifies the four specific effects of self-esteem's stranglehold on our schools-narcissism, emotivism, separatism, and cynicism. It prescribes antidotes to them-empathy, rationality and morality, connectedness, and skepticism-and offers a hopeful view of educational philosophy for the next millennium. Professor Stout urges us to replace our coddling, indulgent approach to building self-esteem in children with a sense of authentic self-confidence developed from intellectual, physical, and moral effort and achievement.
User reviews
Helo
Maureen Stout's book, "The Feel-Good Curriculum," would make a good companion to the works of ED Hirsch, author of "The Knowledge Deficit." These two authors' theses are much the same: over the past forty-or-so years, the "progressive" changes in American education have led to the decline of academic standards, the over-valuing of (a misguided view of) self-esteem, and and the turning out of students ill-prepared for the disciplined nature of the "real world."

Stout is a professor of education at UC Berkley, and like her philosophical kin Hirsch, is interested not only in demonstrating these saddening trends but in exploring their ideational roots. While the usual suspects (Dewey, Thorndike), she also links non-educators like psychologist Carl Rogers and Erik Ericksson with the "child-centered," whole child," and "self-actualization" movements in education.

These movements changed virtually everything about schooling. Instead of teaching students basic academics, their primary goals were not wo help the child reach self-actualizaiton (whatever THAT means!). Instead of seeing discipline as necessary for an ordered school, it was now seen as an antiquated stifler of student enthusiasm.

...And, as Stout points out, the movement kept on going, becoming more and more extreme despite yielding worse and worse reults. As an educator, I found myself oscillating between chuckling and containing anger as I read about current trends in educaiton - Vygotskyan cooperative learning, social (rather than standards-based) promotion, educators as facilitators rather than instructors - that I sadly recognize all too well. And as an educator, I can attest that these are trends that need to be rethought and revamped, but never seem to be; Stout hits these problems right on the head in writing about these problems, not only identifying THAT, but WHY, they are problems.

Stout ends with a section on how we can turn some of these effects around (and her suggestions sound much like those of ED Hirsch). She does not advocate a return to the dark ages where students memorize rote passages and are paddled for misbehavior. She advocates a return to standards-based, rather than "outcome-based" educaiton, readjust our views on the value of discipine, and maybe get rid of the "progressive" idea of self-esteem that equates it with "feeling good for no good reason" rather than an earned feeling of accomplishment.

This is a very, very good book. Those who read it will either be challenged to re-examine cherished views or be further outraged by problems they know too well. Either way, it is not a book to be missed.
Dorilune
As an educator working toward an advanced degree, I chose this book for a class project and found the content interesting, but not anything I haven't yelled about for years. Kids do come to class thinking they don't have to work for their grades, and that's been the case in our district with rampant social promotions. The attitude of student and, in some cases, family entitlement (If you've ever lived in a small town and had to deal with descendants of early settlers of a town, you understand what I mean there!) is unbelievable.

The author points to a long-running progression of loony theories of education, each more permissive and outrageous than the last, that leave Johnny and Susie feeling like they're at the top of the food chain when they can't read and write and perform basic mathematical computations upon high school graduation. In the end, Maureen Stout does offer suggestions on turning the bus around, so to speak, and getting the focus of education back on EDUCATION where it should be. Unfortunately, it's going to be a long, difficult struggle with so many parents, students, and educators buying into the "child centered" feel-good classroom where grades and tests are the enemy because they make Johnny feel bad about himself. Definitely written with a conservative slant.
Qudanilyr
This book is ABSOLUTELY accurate when it comes to how the self-esteem movement has turned our schools away from academics and the gathering of knowledge. Instead, what we now have in place of safe, well organized places where knowledge can be taught, are amateur therapy clinics.

I got into the teaching game late in life, in my late 30's. I liked kids (still do; most of them anyway) and realized that it was through the efforts of a few good teachers that had taught me that I knew anything academic outside of the blue-collar world in which I was raised. My father had to leave school while in 8th grade in order to go to work, my mother was a (reluctant) high school graduate, and they both , especially my father, constantly stressed the importance of education to me as I grew up.

In school, I started out as a promising student, only to end up a goof; the kind of kid I see a lot of; able, but largely unmotivated. Therefore, I have large gaps in various areas of knowledge, which, to this day, I am trying to fill.

At any rate, when I decided to go back to get my teacher certification in reading, which is not one of the areas I am weak in, I was amazed at some of the utter nonsense being taught by my college professors that I was expected to believe. I already had a BBA in business administration, and had substituted for several years from K-12, but to hear so called "experts" saying that to grade papers using red ink could be harmful to a child's psyche, that female teachers should never wear open toed shoes because of a phenomena called "toe cleavage," that turned on adolescent boys, that tests shouldn't be difficult because every child DESERVES to be successful regardless whether they have done anything to achieve said success or not, etc., was almost too much to absorb! There were times I had to almost pinch myself in order to realize that these things were really being said, and were meant to be taken seriously!

I have spent years trying to teach kids things that, I know from experience, they will be expected to know in order to be considered literate adults; fighting every single day against the "I am entitled to a good grade because I am ME" attitudes the self esteem movement has created, but I am afraid that it is a losing battle, because the self esteem movement has become the ESTABLISHED way of teaching (and indeed THINKING) the past 30-40 years. Teachers like myself are considered "troublemakers" when all we are trying to do is the job of educating our kids so that they can compete in the real world with kids that ARE literate, and that DON'T think that they are ENTITLED to make a living regardless of whether they can do the job or NOT! This book lays it all out and tells it like it really is; and it is NOT a pretty picture.
Acebiolane
When how I feel about my accomplishment overshadows the reality of that which is accomplished, we are in trouble as a society. Such it is with education. We have ceased to teach for knowledge and are more concerned about the "feel-good fuzzies". America is rapidly falling behind and more money is not the answer but joins the "self-esteem" group as a part of the problem. This book will make one very uncomfortable and even angry if you believe that what we are teaching our kids is "world class".