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Free eBook Don't Let the Sun Step Over You: A White Mountain Apache Family Life, 1860–1975 download

by Keith H. Basso,Eva Tulene Watt

Free eBook Don't Let the Sun Step Over You: A White Mountain Apache Family Life, 1860–1975 download ISBN: 0816523916
Author: Keith H. Basso,Eva Tulene Watt
Publisher: University of Arizona Press; 1 edition (September 1, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 340
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Size MP3: 1685 mb
Size FLAC: 1925 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: docx doc lit mbr


In a voice that is spare, factual, and unflinchingly direct, Mrs. Watt reveals how the Western Apaches carried on in the face of poverty, hardship, and disease.

Richly illustrated with more than 50 photographs, Don t Let the Sun Step Over You is a rare and remarkable book that affords a view of the past that few have seen before a wholly Apache view, unsettling yet uplifting, which weighs upon the mind and educates the heart.

Born in 1913, she recorded the interviews with Basso between 1997 and 2002. Mrs. Watt's reason for sharing her stories sums up the importance of oral information: "t's not for me I am doing it-it's not for me myself. It's for those younger generations that come along here in later years.

Keith Hamilton Basso (March 15, 1940 – August 4, 2013) was a cultural and linguistic anthropologist noted for . Keith H. Basso and Steven Feld (1996). Don’t Let the Sun Step Over You: A White Mountain Apache Family Life, 1860–1975 (2004), an oral history with Eva Tulene Watt.

Keith Hamilton Basso (March 15, 1940 – August 4, 2013) was a cultural and linguistic anthropologist noted for his study of the Western Apaches, specifically those from the community of Cibecue, Arizona  .

Neat, the story of White Mountain Apache life from the late 1800s into the 1970s

Neat, the story of White Mountain Apache life from the late 1800s into the 1970s.

with assistance from Keith H. Basso. This is a rare and remarkable book

with assistance from Keith H. This is a rare and remarkable book. Composed of dozens of narratives by Eva Tulene Watt, a White Mountain Apache born in 1913, it brings to life a vanished time-and some striking men and women who lived it to the fullest-in a way that recasts history. A work of devotion and courage,Don’t Let the Sun Step Over Youaffords a view of the past that few have seen before, a wholly Apache view, unsettling yet uplifting, that weighs upon the mind and educates the heart Save. Part One We Sure Did Travel All Over (1860–1929)

Author:-Keith H. Basso, Eva Tulene Watt. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- You may also like. Family Life Paperback Books. Let's Go Paperback Books.

Author:-Keith H. Title:-Don&t Let the Sun Step over You: A White Mountain Apache Family Life (1860-1975). Publisher Date:-2004-09-30. Read full description.

Step over You : A White Mountain Apache Family Life, 1860-1975 Later I found out, from my grandparents that Eva was a distant relative to me.

Don't Let the Sun Step over You : A White Mountain Apache Family Life, 1860-1975. I first found this book in a bookstore in Pinetop, AZ. I picked it up because it sounded interesting. Later I found out, from my grandparents that Eva was a distant relative to me. She mentions her uncles, one of them is John Lupe; my great-great grandfather. I loved this book and was completely taken in by her stories. This book has become a treasure to me and the rest of my family's members.

In 1997, Eva Tulane Watt, a White Mountain Apache born in 1913, came to a long-time acquaintance, anthropologist Keith Basso and told him You might like to record on tape a few family stories from long years ago. For the next 5 years, Mrs. Watt, in the kitchen of her home on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation, recorded dozens of stories about life and death, and the struggle to endure. She spoke of her childhood memories of hunting, gathering, and preparing meals

Her book affords a view of the past that few have seen before-a wholly Apache view, unsettling yet uplifting, which weighs upon the mind and educates the heart.

When the Apache wars ended in the late nineteenth century, a harsh and harrowing time began for the Western Apache people. Living under the authority of nervous Indian agents, pitiless government-school officials, and menacing mounted police, they knew that resistance to American authority would be foolish. But some Apache families did resist in the most basic way they could: they resolved to endure. Although Apache history has inspired numerous works by non-Indian authors, Apache people themselves have been reluctant to comment at length on their own past. Eva Tulene Watt, born in 1913, now shares the story of her family from the time of the Apache wars to the modern era. Her narrative presents a view of history that differs fundamentally from conventional approaches, which have almost nothing to say about the daily lives of Apache men and women, their values and social practices, and the singular abilities that enabled them to survive. In a voice that is spare, factual, and unflinchingly direct, Mrs. Watt reveals how the Western Apaches carried on in the face of poverty, hardship, and disease. Her interpretation of her people’s past is a diverse assemblage of recounted events, biographical sketches, and cultural descriptions that bring to life a vanished time and the men and women who lived it to the fullest. We share her and her family’s travels and troubles. We learn how the Apache people struggled daily to find work, shelter, food, health, laughter, solace, and everything else that people in any community seek. Richly illustrated with more than 50 photographs, Don’t Let the Sun Step Over You is a rare and remarkable book that affords a view of the past that few have seen before—a wholly Apache view, unsettling yet uplifting, which weighs upon the mind and educates the heart.
User reviews
Hellmaster
This book is a verbatim transcription of Mrs. Watt's interviews and stories of Apache life after the end of the Indian Wars and the modern reservation period. It is both an oral history and a revelation of Apache culture, tradition, belief, and lifestyle. As a person who has Apache friends and has enjoyed the opportunity to do volunteer work and teach college classes on the San Carlos Reservation, it was delightful to read the story in the Apache accented English, with it's distinctive word usage and cadence. It was also exciting to get a glimpse of Apache home life from her childhood, before the traditional lifestyle was diluted by the reservation, technology, and the influence of American society.

Keith H. Basso, Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at UNM, has done a masterful job of allowing the story to be a truly Apache story both in viewpoint and the enigmatic way of the Apache to leave some things unsaid but implied. There are a few places in the narration where he adds a bit of explanation, but most clarification is given in end notes at the end of the book. This is certainly not a typical scholarly paper, but an accurate engaging real life story of drama, humor, love, hardship, and survival all told in Eva Watt's upbeat and energetic style. This book was fun to read, yet in a number of places inspired me to do more research on things that were not major events in the story, but opened questions I wanted to answer. A great book on several levels, this "good read" is now a valuable part of my research library.
Ffleg
In doing research on the Apache, this book gives you a good look at how the women think and feel about their history.
Memuro
Very informative and precise. I got this book for class, and was able to read it easily on my tablet
Tholmeena
Authentic storytelling! Wonderful and true insight into history from someone who LIVED it rather than just studied or wrote about it.
Dalarin
Life changing! I would not underrate it. Easily understood. Plan to buy extras to give to daughters, coworkers etc
Doriel
We travel through some of that country quite often and it give a different perspective of the area.
Onath
I saw this book as a rare insight to a different culture. Worth the time to read. Not a quick read.
What was awesome about the book was the history...the places she talks about the storis she told. As a member of the White Mountain Apache living in Indiana with my four boys it made them proud of their heritage and as each of them read out loud the look on each of their faces as Eva describes places on the reservation they knew the exact place she was talking about. Their great grandma who is still alive in Whiteriver use to tell them a lot of similiar stories Eva talks about, the Soldiers in Fort Apache, and just life in general in the early 1900's seeing it in print just made the experience of reading the book as a family was just awesome!! as my 6 year old stated when we asked if he liked the book.