» » Desi Divas: Political Activism in South Asian American Cultural Performances

Free eBook Desi Divas: Political Activism in South Asian American Cultural Performances download

by Christine L. Garlough

Free eBook Desi Divas: Political Activism in South Asian American Cultural Performances download ISBN: 161703732X
Author: Christine L. Garlough
Publisher: University Press of Mississippi (February 19, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Size MP3: 1363 mb
Size FLAC: 1699 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lrf txt doc lit


South Asian American women's role as "tradition bearers" within their .

I ndeed, diasporic folk performances and broader cultural practices are not simply entertaining. In terms of recognition and identity politics, they also allow for individuals to publicly ally themselves with burgeoning communities.

Christine L. Garlough. Desi Divas pp 145-180; doi:10.

Garlough, Christine L. Format: eBook.

Desi Divas: Political Activism in South Asian American Cultural Performances. University Press of Mississippi. Christine L.

The Asian American Women’s Political Initiative (AAWPI) 2020 State House Fellowship Program is now accepting applicants! We are looking for Asian American women who are passionate about community activism in Asian American communities in Massachusetts

The Asian American Women’s Political Initiative (AAWPI) 2020 State House Fellowship Program is now accepting applicants! We are looking for Asian American women who are passionate about community activism in Asian American communities in Massachusetts. h a part-time internship at the Massachusetts State House in Boston, MA.

Theatre, Dance and Performance Training, 6 (3). pp. 353 - 354. ISSN: 1944-3927.

Tracing the genealogy of Asian immigrant labor and cultural production in the racial and gender formations of the pre-World War II. .Lisa Lowe does the most important and influential work in Asian American cultural studies today.

Tracing the genealogy of Asian immigrant labor and cultural production in the racial and gender formations of the pre-World War II, and contemporary . State, Lisa Lowe offers us an ambitious, elegant, and incisive analysis that propels Asian immigrant women workers (and comparative feminist theory) to the center of discourses of nation and citizenship.

Garlough, Christine . 1967-. Toward acknowledgment: care in diasporic performances - Performing South Asian American histories - National recognition and community acknowledgment - A future in relation to the other - Cultural activism and sexuality in feminist performance - Intertwining folklore and rhetoric: cultural performance, acknowledgment, and social justice.

Desi Divas: Activism in South Asian American Cultural Performances is the product of five years of field research with progressive activists associated with the School for Indian Languages and Cultures (SILC), South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT), the feminist dance collective Post Natyam, and the grassroots feminist political organization South Asian Sisters. Christine L. Garlough explores how traditional cultural forms may be critically appropriated by marginalized groups and used as rhetorical tools to promote deliberation and debate, spur understanding and connection, broaden political engagement, and advance particular social identities. Within this framework she examines how these performance activists advocate a political commitment to both justice and care, to both deliberative discussion and deeper understanding. To consider how this might happen in diasporic performance contexts, Garlough weaves together two lines of thinking. One grows from feminist theory and draws upon a core literature concerning the ethics of care. The other comes from rhetoric, philosophy, and political science literature on recognition and acknowledgment. This dual approach is used to reflect upon South Asian American women's performances that address pressing social problems related to gender inequality, immigration rights, ethnic stereotyping, hate crimes, and religious violence.

Case study chapters address the relatively unknown history of South Asian American rhetorical performances from the early 1800s to the present. Avant-garde feminist performances by the Post Natyam dance collective appropriate women's folk practices and Hindu goddess figures make rhetorical claims about hate crimes against South Asian Americans after 9/11. In Yoni ki Bat (a South Asian American version of The Vagina Monologues) a progressive performer transforms aspects of the Mahabharata narrative to address issues of sexual violence, such as incest and rape. Throughout the volume, Garlough argues that these performers rely on calls for acknowledgment that intertwine calls for justice and care. That is, they embed their testimony in traditional cultural forms to invite interest, reflection, and connection.