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by Reid

Free eBook Verandah of Violence: The Background to the Aceh Problem download ISBN: 0295986336
Author: Reid
Publisher: University of Washington Press (May 22, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 423
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Size MP3: 1273 mb
Size FLAC: 1553 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: lit doc doc lit


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In August 2005 Indonesia and Aceh signed a peace agreement designed to put an end to the conflict between the two sides. This book offers a guide to the complexities of modern Aceh as it moves toward peace and reconstruction

In August 2005 Indonesia and Aceh signed a peace agreement designed to put an end to the conflict between the two sides. This book offers a guide to the complexities of modern Aceh as it moves toward peace and reconstruction. The balanced coverage by leading authorities, historians and political scientists as well as journalists, probes the underlying causes of the conflict that has pitted Aceh against Jakarta.

Verandah of Violence: The Background to the Aceh Problem. Nalanda Roy. Published: 1 January 2008. in Perspectives on Global Development and Technology. Perspectives on Global Development and Technology, Volume 7, pp 189-190; doi:10.

In book: Antony Reid (ed), Veranda of Violence: The Background to the Aceh Problem, Publisher . Indonesia's most northwestern province, Aceh, has been the scene of an independence struggle for around a generation

In book: Antony Reid (ed), Veranda of Violence: The Background to the Aceh Problem, Publisher: Singapore University Press. Cite this publication. Indonesia's most northwestern province, Aceh, has been the scene of an independence struggle for around a generation. In spite of the end of Soeharto's authoritarian regime in May 1998, and the emergence of real democratization in the Indonesian body politic, violence in Aceh has continued to grow steadily worse, reaching record levels by the end of 2001.

This book offers a guide to the complexities of modern Aceh, a land dubbed "The Verandah of Mecca," as it moves toward peace and reconstruction. Maps and Illustrations In Memoriam Preface Acknowledgements Spelling and Usage Contributors Glossary and Abbreviations Chronology of Events 1. Introduction, Anthony Reid 2. Indian and Indonesian Elements in Early North Sumatra, E. Edwards McKinnon 3. Aceh in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries: "Serambi Mekkah" and Identity, Peter G. Riddell 4. The Pre-modern Sultanate's View of its Place in the World, Anthony Reid. An unknown error has occurred. Singapore: Singapore University Press, NUS Publishing, 2006.

Violence and identity formation in Aceh under Indonesian rule. In A. Reid (E., Verandah of violence: The background to the Aceh problem. Singapore: Singapore University Press. Political Islam in post-Soeharto Indonesia. In V. Hooker, & A. Saikal (Ed., Islamic perspectives on the new millennium. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

CAPTCHA . Skip to the audio challenge. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page. The structure of cities in Southeast Asia, fifteenth to seventeenth centuries. Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 11 (2), 235-250, 1980. Southeast Asia in the early modern era: trade, power, and belief. Southeast Asian exports since the 14th century: cloves, pepper, coffee, and sugar. D Bulbeck, A Reid, TL Cheng, W Yiqi.

In Indonesia's westernmost province of Aceh, the democratization process that began in Indonesia in 1998 encouraged the overt expression of regionalist sentiment and resentment of the military. The surprising extent of both feelings made Aceh, home to a long-standing independence movement, the next potential candidate after East Timor to break away from Indonesia, and led to harsh repressive measures by the military.The tsunami of December 2004 brought incalculable destruction and loss to Aceh. At the same time, it brought international sympathy and aid on an unprecedented scale, along with new pressures for peace. In August 2005, Indonesia and Aceh signed a peace agreement designed to put an end to the conflict.This book offers a guide to the complexities of modern Aceh, a land dubbed "The Verandah of Mecca," as it moves toward peace and reconstruction. With balanced coverage by leading authorities, historians, political scientists, and journalists, Verandah of Violence probes the underlying causes of the conflict that has pitted Aceh against Jakarta, explaining why the Acehnese entered the Indonesian republic in 1945 with an unparalleled determination to resist outside domination, and how these attitudes have shaped Aceh's relations with the Indonesian state.
User reviews
Hadadel
"Verandah of Violence" is a study of the unrest in Indonesia's Aceh region. The collection of perspectives examines the various causes, interpretations of history, colonial and contemporary uses of force among other social and religious factors that have contributed Aceh's popular support for succession and/or autonomy. The book invites a diverse audience of readers, from all sides of conflict, by starting with the humanitarian crisis of 2004. Amidst the human causes of violence, a deadly tsunami reminds of humanities need for restoration.

It is appropriate that the book takes a few chapters to study the history of the Aceh region considering that interpretation of history is such a large portion of the separatist narrative. But if the reader is looking for a definitive answer to "true" history this book is not meant to correct any "false" Aceh perceptions. The Aceh region sits at the crossroads of East to West trade routes and therefore an attractive landholding for empires through the centuries. Internal Dutch and British diplomacy used parts of Malaysia and Indonesia (including Aceh) as pawns to global land swaps: specifically in the 1824 and 1871 treaties.

Unlike the rest of Indonesia, the Dutch exerted more force upon Aceh in order to colonize it. In fact it was described as the "... gravest Dutch strategy mistake of the century" (pg. 97). Thousands lost their lives on all sides. "Dutch colony" on paper and later "Indonesian" according to maps, the fierce Aceh separatist cause takes offence to claims that they had ever been conquered, which adds to their argument for independence.

Aceh's chief complaint (along with its Islamic exceptionalism) is that history is being rewritten, or at least misinterpreted. It's an interesting accusation considering the entire history of the Indonesian archipelago. Various narratives and historical events are used to instill unity in the diverse 17,000 island nation. The ideology of Pancasila (which, while mandating religion in concept, human dignity and democracy, does not specifically endorse Islam) is the foundation of Indonesia's solidarity, not to mention school curriculum core.

Even in the case for Indonesian solidarity, the reader may get the feeling that Aceh is the exception. The authors feel the need to qualify and explain strong showings of Indonesian nationalism at points in Aceh's history, as if to undermine the importance of nationalist movements.

After leveling a number of justifiable accusation against TNI, the book finally covers the atrocious realities of some of GAM's (Gerakan Aceh Merdeka) rampages, which included the torching of 600 schools; the propagandist of "false" history and brainwashing. These chapters do provide good coverage of the violent tactics of Aceh's separatist movements. The belated, if perhaps random placement of GAM's dark side in this collection does give the reader the perception of a justified rebel group, resorting to violence as a last resort.

Finally, one of the most interesting aspects of the book is the description of Indonesia's various military (TNI) strategies. The TNI along with its many civilian and paramilitary proxies were an important force to quell uprisings throughout the islands, especially in locations such as East Timor, Papua and Aceh which not only resided on the border extremes of the state but also the cultural, religious, linguistic and apparent "historical" borders of Indonesia's dominant identities.

Suharto, a military man himself, knew the dangers of an overly powerful and influential military that was not on his side. Towards the latter end of Suharto's power, he grew increasingly wary of his own military, continually sharpened through internal conflicts and growing to address internal separatist threats.
Unnis
Why has Aceh been a constant source of unrest in Indonesia? Reid has collected a series of papers by various authors on this problem. We see the history of Aceh, and how it kept a distinct identity under Dutch colonialism and later under Javanese rule. In part due to a slightly different strand of Islam. But also a regionalism that may have been in part a reaction against the numerical dominance of Java. To some readers, think perhaps of Scotland vis-a-vis England.

The book describes different ideas within Aceh's activists. Some want full independence from Indonesia, which to them is tantamount to Java. Others prefer greater regional rights within a federal Indonesia. The reaction of the Indonesian military to both has been suppression. There is an interesting parallel between Aceh and East Timor. In the latter, the people were mostly Christian. While Aceh is Muslim. But the predominantly Muslim military used many of the same methods of suppression against both regions. The military saw its primary duty as holding a disparate nation together, by whatever means necessary.