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Free eBook The Minds of Marginalized Black Men: Making Sense of Mobility, Opportunity, and Future Life Chances (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology) download

by Alford A. Young Jr.

Free eBook The Minds of Marginalized Black Men: Making Sense of Mobility, Opportunity, and Future Life Chances (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology) download ISBN: 0691092427
Author: Alford A. Young Jr.
Publisher: Princeton University Press; First edition (December 22, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 288
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Size MP3: 1500 mb
Size FLAC: 1601 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: mbr lrf rtf doc


The Minds of Marginalized Black Men: Making Sense of Mobility, Opportunity, and Future Life Chances. Alford A. Young Jr. Paperback. Young, J. is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and in the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan. -Terry Williams, The New School.

The Minds of Marginalized. has been added to your Cart. ―Terry Williams, The New School. From the Inside Flap. There are few studies written with such power of voice and ethnographic and theoretical verisimilitude. Young has captured the essence of these men.

Moving beyond stereotypes, this book examines how twenty-six poverty-stricken African American men from Chicago view their prospects for getting ahead. It documents their definitions of good jobs and the good life-and their beliefs about whether and how these can be attained.

Article in Contemporary Sociology 34(4):391-392 · July 2005 with 4 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

Got it. We value your privacy. Article in Contemporary Sociology 34(4):391-392 · July 2005 with 4 Reads.

Series: Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology. Introduction Making New Sense of Poor Black Men in Crisis. The minds of the men in this book, as with all people, have been shaped in reaction to past and present experiences

Series: Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology. These are the words of young black men who were born into urban poverty. The minds of the men in this book, as with all people, have been shaped in reaction to past and present experiences. Before looking at their interpretations of the social world, it is important to know something about the social world of the Near West Side of Chicago. In doing so we must take note of the meanings that these men give to the institutions, experiences, and individuals that they encounter in everyday life.

Start by marking The Minds of Marginalized Black Men: Making .

Start by marking The Minds of Marginalized Black Men: Making Sense of Mobility, Opportunity, and Future Life Chances as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Based on intensive interviews, the book reveals how these men have experienced varying degrees of exposure to more-privileged s that ground their understandings of how racism and socioeconomic inequality determine their life chances. It shows how the men draw upon such experiences as they make meaning of the complex circumstances in which they strive to succeed.

Young, Alford A. Publication date. Princeton University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Making sense of mobility, opportunity, And future life chances. opportunity, and future life chances, Alford A. Young, Jr. p. c. (Princeton studies in cultural sociology). Princeton university press princeton and oxford. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Ideology and Cultural Production 391 The Minds of Marginalized Black Men: Making . Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2004

Ideology and Cultural Production 391 The Minds of Marginalized Black Men: Making Sense of Mobility, Opportunity, and Future Life Chances, by Alford A. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2004. ISBN: 0-691-09242- 7. NIKKI JONES University of California-Santa Barbara Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the "problem of the color line" has dramati- cally transformed into the "crisis of the black male. In its focus on how poor black men give meaning to their life circumstances, The Minds of Marginalized Black Men "represents a new approach for overturning a long legacy of . .

By Alford A. Princeton, . : Princeton University Press, 2004. On the Relation Between Sociology and Ethics. Racial Profiling and Use of Force in Police Stops: How Local Events Trigger Periods of Increased Discrimination. John L. Jackson, Jr. University of Pennsylvania. Getting a Job: Is There a Motherhood Penalty? Correll et al. The Mark of a Criminal Record. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

While we hear much about the "culture of poverty" that keeps poor black men poor, we know little about how such men understand their social position and relationship to the American dream. Moving beyond stereotypes, this book examines how twenty-six poverty-stricken African American men from Chicago view their prospects for getting ahead. It documents their definitions of good jobs and the good life--and their beliefs about whether and how these can be attained. In its pages, we meet men who think seriously about work, family, and community and whose differing experiences shape their views of their social world.

Based on intensive interviews, the book reveals how these men have experienced varying degrees of exposure to more-privileged Americans--differences that ground their understandings of how racism and socioeconomic inequality determine their life chances. The poorest and most socially isolated are, perhaps surprisingly, most likely to believe that individuals can improve their own lot. By contrast, men who regularly leave their neighborhood tend to have a wider range of opportunities but also have met with more racism, hostility, and institutional obstacles--making them less likely to believe in the American Dream.

Demonstrating how these men interpret their social world, this book seeks to de-pathologize them without ignoring their experiences with chronic unemployment, prison, and substance abuse. It shows how the men draw upon such experiences as they make meaning of the complex circumstances in which they strive to succeed.

User reviews
Questanthr
Lots of books have been written about poor, black males in Chicago. There is the personal ("Our America"), the journalistic ("There Are No Children Here"), and the academic ("Slim's Table"). In this book, the author tries to analyze how 26 young, poor black men think, and not just what they do or the choices they make. He has some very counterintuitive findings.
As great as a book this is, reading it can be depressing to the nth degree. The interview subjects are just clueless about how society is organized and how the marketplace is changing. They come off as so naive and uninformed! This could really help fortify racist fallacies about black mens' intelligence.
Further, the people in power who are most interested in hurting black men could have a field day with this book. The subjects almost never say racism is a big deal. They blame themselves entirely for what has happened in their lives. They believe that a positive attitude will change all their woes. This type of "pull yourself by the bootstraps" lets racism and classism in American institutions off the hook.
Further, this book may hurt people who believe in or benefit from affirmative action. The author observes that those who have had the most exposures across races and classes are the most cognizant of racism and classism in this country. Many people might read this and say, "Well then blacks would be less angry at others if they didn't observe us." or "If diversity makes blacks bitter, they should not be exposed to it." etc. Thank goodness the Supreme Court already stated that affirmative action is legal in Michigan where the author works.
Speaking of Michigan, I am surprised that the author did not complete his study there. Like Chicago, Detroit has problems with segregation, unemployment, and post-industrialization. Why keep making Chicago look bad when many urban areas are hard places in which to live for African-American men?
Despite my critiques, I enjoyed this book. I actually do recommend it for antiracist activists and other progressive thinkers.
Nalmergas
This is a great book for anyone interested in conducting an ethnographic research project or understanding the mindset of impoverished urban communities.
Malann
This is an excellent example of qualitative research done well, and done in an accessible way for the non-academic. Insightful!