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Free eBook Iron Cages: Race and Culture in 19th-Century America download

by Ronald T. Takaki

Free eBook Iron Cages: Race and Culture in 19th-Century America download ISBN: 0195063856
Author: Ronald T. Takaki
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (May 10, 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 416
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Size MP3: 1434 mb
Size FLAC: 1844 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: lrf docx rtf mbr


Ronald Takaki did a great job in this book. What first hit me was his analysis of Herman Melville's Moby Dick.

Ronald Takaki did a great job in this book. I had learned about Moby Dick and had read about Moby Dick. I even read the novel. I had very much enjoyed other novels by Melville but was not all that keen on Moby Dick. But Takaki made a connection between Meville's Moby Dick and my education in philosophy, history and the social sciences. But the big surprise for me is that no advanced sociological theorist will feel that he or she is wasting money either!

This pathbreaking work offers a cohesive study of the foundations of race and culture in America.

Takaki, Ronald . 1939-2009. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by SeanFagan on February 2, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Democracy in America: The Inner World of the Bourgeoisie. The Market Revolution and Race. A Vision of Catastrophe: Henry George and the American Tower of Babel. An Age of Confidence.

This pathbreaking work offers a cohesive study of the foundations of race and culture in America. In a new epilogue, Takaki argues that the social health of the United States rests largely on the ability of Americans of all races and cultures to build on an established and positive legacy of cross-cultural cooperation and understanding in the coming 21st century.

Remainder mark rubber stamped Major study of race relations (Blacks, Indians, Mexicans, Asians) from the time of the Revolution to the Spanish- Am. War ISBN: 0394483103 (Minorities, Race Relations, Black Studies). Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Shouse, Sarah Newman. Hillbilly Realist: Herman Clarence Nixon of Possum Trot.

New York: Oxford University Press. Republics, Nations, and Tribes. German-English bilingual schools in America: The Cincinnati tradition in historical context. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc. Veracini, L. (2011). Introducing Settler Colonial Studies. Settler Colonial Studies, 1 (1), 1-12. The Ethnic Dimension in American Catholic Parochial Education. In T. Walch (E., Immigrant America: European Ethnicity in the United States. New York & London: Garland Publishing.

Race and Culture in 19th-Century America. Observing that by 2050 all Americans will be minorities, Takaki urges us to ask ourselves: Will America fulfill the promise of equality or will America retreat into its "iron cages" and resist diversity, allowing racial conflicts to divide and possibly even destroy America as a nation? Incisive and provocative, Iron Cages is an essential resource for students of ethnic history and important reading for anyone interested in the history of race relations in America.

A pathbreaking work by one of the leading scholars in the field, Iron Cages provides a unique comparative analysis of white attitudes toward Asians, Blacks, Mexicans, and Native Americans in the nineteenth century, offering a cohesive study of the foundations of race and culture in America. With a new epilogue that assesses the prospect for race relations in contemporary American society, Iron Cages is important reading for anyone interested in the history of race relations in America. In his provocative new epilogue, "The Fourth Iron Cage," Takaki focuses on race in contemporary society within the context of America's nuclear arms-oriented ceconomy. He compares the Asian-American "model minority" and the black underclass, and extends his analysis to Native Americans, Chicanos, and Puerto Ricans.
User reviews
Nikobar
Good read
Shaktiktilar
Very good book. Love to read it!
Tejora
I was privileged to be Ronald Takaki's student at the University of California, Berkeley when he was completing his research on this insightful, wonderfully enlightening work. The course he taught from his research was the most meaningful, stimulating, truly inspirational I have taken in my many years as a student. Dr. Takaki is not only intellectually incandescent, but is a profoundly humane and compassionate man. As a high school social studies teacher, I have included Dr. Takaki's premises and conclusions in every class I teach and never fail to see the same sort of epiphanies in my students that I, myself, experienced. Dr. Takaki makes entirely comprehensible the paradigm of racism, sexism and elitism which has so long prevailed in our society; and his observations are as pertinent and contemporary today as they were a quarter of a century ago. A marvelous book!
Urllet
haven't started yet but looking forward to it, my teacher keeps saying its an awesome book
Olelifan
asdf
Stoneshaper
Ronald Takaki did a great job in this book. What first hit me was his analysis of Herman Melville's Moby Dick. I had learned about Moby Dick and had read about Moby Dick. I even read the novel. I had very much enjoyed other novels by Melville but was not all that keen on Moby Dick. But Takaki made a connection between Meville's Moby Dick and my education in philosophy, history and the social sciences. After that I suddenly "saw" why Moby Dick may be considered to be THE great American novel. It is a critique of many aspects of the worst parts of American ideology, including a kind of repression discussed by Norman O. Brown (1959) in Life Against Death: The Psychoanalytic Meaning of History. But in addition to having insightful "psychoanalytic" accounts of the lives of a number of eminent American men who we have mostly forgotten about (e.g. Alfred Thayer Mahan) Takaki also does something I have rarely seen in books about ethnicity and race, He clearly links racism and xenophobia with the sociological study of the relationship between "history" and "biography" (C. Wright Mills' The Sociological Imagination). I believe that perhaps this book has fallen off the radar of "sociological theory" in sociology and "social theory" in cultural studies because Takaki became known primarily for his studies of ethnicity per se. But this may be his basic "theoretical" book. I found insights here that were inter-connected in ways I have never seen them linked together before. I first bought the book (used) because of the title. I am a big fan of Max Weber and have written about Weber's ideal type analysis of bureaucracy, etc. I was intrigued by the idea of Iron Cages rather than just the one and only "Iron Cage" as a metaphor for advanced corporate capitalism. Ahab in Moby Dick suffers from the psychological "demonic iron cage", a topic that Weber did not address directly (only by implication). It is directly linked to the social psychological notion in Karl Marx's early writings of "alienation". In fact Marx's statement quoted at the outset sets the stage very well: "Self-renunciation, the renunciation of life and of all human needs, is its principal thesis. The less you eat, drink and buy books [!]; the less you go to the threatre, the dance hall, the public house; the less you think, love, theorize, sing, paint, fence [with swords], etc., the more you save -- the greater becomes your treasure ... your capital. The less you are, the less you express your own life, the greater is your alienated life, the more you have, the greater is your store of your estranged being". That is Marx discussing Weber's this-worldly asceticism of the original Protestant Ethic! (It could be misunderstood. Marx is clearly NOT saying that one should never save at all, etc., or that "conspicuous consumption" by billionaires is a great thing. He is talking about the alienation faced by many average so-called "middle class families" and "small business owners" struggling in the globalized world of today.) The link between extreme self denial for the purpose of accumulating "capital" in small businesses to Freudian and Neo-Freudian notions of psychological repression is clear in Takaki's book. This is a great book. Takaki apparently suffered from Multiple Sclerosis. His wife Carol Rankin Takaki says he was her great friend. She suffered racist views within her own family for marrying a man who, although born in the U.S. (in Hawai'i), was labelled by her family a "Jap". Many of the deeper psychological sources of the hatred of Hawai'i born Barack Husein Obama can be found analyze in this penetrating book. Margaret C. Farrett says that as a student of Takaki she experienced "epiphanies" hearing him lecture. I can fully understand that since I experienced similar deep insights reading this powerful and eloquent thinker. The "Epilogue" for the 1990 edition clarifies the "fourth" Iron Cage. It is the combination or "integration" of the republican, corporate and demonic iron cages (p. 309). It is an astute analysis of the way in which the far right has used the myth of the success of persons of Asian background to undermine African-Americans caught in the vicious cycle of very low wages and very high unemployment. He uses statistical information the way it was supposed to be used, without obfuscation. He acknowledges that many Americans of "European" background, now called "whites" (but including poor Jews, Italians, Lebanese, etc.) suffer from deep frustration. He makes good use of the notion of a "king" (not capitalized) as a symbol of "community", and the killing of the "king" as a celebration of "republican" individualism that was nevertheless founded in part on slavery (e.g. Thomas Jefferson) as found in work by Winthrope D. Jordan (1973) and Gordon S. Wood (1969). [The references can be found in Takaki's book.] No student of American history will feel that she or he has wasted money buying this book. But the big surprise for me is that no advanced sociological theorist will feel that he or she is wasting money either! The time and effort required to read this 385 page book (relatively small type font) is well spent. It helps that Takaki expresses complex ideas in clear language. My only complaint is that I never got a chance to meet this remarkable American scholar.
doesnt Do You
Professor Takaki picks up where Max Weber left off, in that he illustrates how white men of means - those "culture makers" of early American society, effectively raised the American level of technical rationalization to not only oppress Africans, Asians, Mexicans, and Native Americas, but how that heightened level of rationalization ultimately subsumed those "culture makers" themselves. (He briefly illustrates how this animus was turned toward women in helping to define what white men were not.) He connects the ascendency of technical rationalization to the rationalization employed by a religious ethic that stresses religious salvation through work and the suppression of natural instincts. His study is not accusatory; it is illustrative.
By use of diaries and works culled from the deepest annals of history, Professor Takaki points out and points to the vulnerability, ambivalence, befuddlement and powerlessness felt and experienced by the founding fathers, who looked to build a moral nation - one not mirroring the licentiousness and dissipation of Great Britain. The very mores, however, advanced by the founding fathers, in twisted and convoluted turns, gave rise to the very "profligacy" and "luxury" that threatened the infant nation. It is from this point forward where the Professor effectively links the oppression of black slavery to other forms of white racial animus experienced by those groups not labeled, or hesitantly so, as white and particularly male.
Joel Kovel's White Racism: A Psychohistory is both a good and interesting follow-up read.
Takaki explores race and it relation to the economic intent of the majority. He uses people such as Thomas Jefferson, Dr. Rush, Roosevelt, and others to illustrate differing ideas in dealing with the race problems. Excelent book for those who want to understand where racist ideals originated from and how these same ideals are still played out today.