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Free eBook Black Consciousness in South Africa: The Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White Supremacy (SUNY Series in African Politics and Society) download

by Robert Fatton Jr.

Free eBook Black Consciousness in South Africa: The Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White Supremacy (SUNY Series in African Politics and Society) download ISBN: 088706129X
Author: Robert Fatton Jr.
Publisher: SUNY Press (January 15, 1986)
Language: English
Pages: 189
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1490 mb
Size FLAC: 1165 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: txt lrf lit lrf


Robert Fatton analyzes the development and radicalization of South Africa's Black Consciousness Movement from its inception in the late 1960s Black Consciousness in South Africa provides a new perspective on black politics in South Africa

Robert Fatton analyzes the development and radicalization of South Africa's Black Consciousness Movement from its inception in the late 1960s Black Consciousness in South Africa provides a new perspective on black politics in South Africa. It demonstrates and assesses critically the radical character and aspirations of African resistance to white minority rule. Robert Fatton analyzes the development and radicalization of South Africa's Black Consciousness Movement from its inception in the late 1960s to its banning in 1977.

Society and Politics. History of Labour Movements in South Africa. Visit our YouTube Channel. Produced 06 February 2013. Last Updated 01 September 2019. Know something about this topic? Contribute. Towards a people's history.

Even Robert Fatton in Black Consciousness in South Africa, the Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White Supremacy (Albany, NJ: SUNY Press, 1986) reduces Fanon to the terrorist acts of POQO (the Pan Africanist Congress’ military wing), see 24–26

Even Robert Fatton in Black Consciousness in South Africa, the Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White Supremacy (Albany, NJ: SUNY Press, 1986) reduces Fanon to the terrorist acts of POQO (the Pan Africanist Congress’ military wing), see 24–26. What Biko found in Fanon is never mentioned.

Black Consciousness in South Africa: The Dialetics of Ideological Resistance to White Supremacy. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1986. ix + 189 pp. Notes, bibliography, index. University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 23 May 2014.

Consciousness in South Africa: The Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White. This article examines ecumenical endeavour and student politics in South Africa in the 1960s and early 1970s to bring into fresh perspective sources of antiapartheid activism.

Black Consciousness in South Africa: The Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White. The article explores Christian ecumenical developments in the twentieth century and specifically the crisis point reached in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre.

SUNY Series in African Politics and Society It is an insufficient element, however, as the full unfolding of the dialectics requires the creation of a society without races and without classes.

SUNY Series in African Politics and Society. This book on the Black Consciousness Movement of South Africa grew out of a doctoral dissertation prepared for the Department of Government of the University of Notre Dame. It owes a great deal to Professor Peter Walshe, the director of my thesis, whose commitment to social justice and a more humane society sharpened my interests in the politics of development and guided my attention to movements of popular resistance to opporession and racism. It is an insufficient element, however, as the full unfolding of the dialectics requires the creation of a society without races and without classes.

The black consciousness movement in South Africa emerged in the 1960s after the banning of anti-apartheid . 7. Black Consciousness in South Africa: The Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White Supremacy by Robert Fatton

The black consciousness movement in South Africa emerged in the 1960s after the banning of anti-apartheid political parties and leadership. Black consciousness played a huge role in apartheid South Africa, helping the African child to love themselves, find their identity and to become more political. Black Consciousness in South Africa: The Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White Supremacy by Robert Fatton. Black Consciousness in South Africa: The Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White Supremacy.

The Black Consciousness Movement (BCM) was a grassroots anti-Apartheid activist movement that emerged in South Africa in the mid-1960s out of the political vacuum created by the jailing and banning of the African National Congress and Pan Africanist.

The Black Consciousness Movement (BCM) was a grassroots anti-Apartheid activist movement that emerged in South Africa in the mid-1960s out of the political vacuum created by the jailing and banning of the African National Congress and Pan Africanist Congress leadership after the Sharpeville Massacre in 1960. The BCM represented a social movement for political consciousness.

Author: Fatton, Robert. SUNY series in African politics and society. Physical Description: 1 online resource (ix, 189 pages). Series: SUNY series in African politics and society. General Note: Revision of the author's thesis (Ph. -University of Notre Dame. Subject Term: Blacks - South Africa - Politics and government. Blacks - Race identity - South Africa. Blacks - South Africa - Social conditions. White supremacy movements - South Africa - History. SOCIAL SCIENCE - Anthropology - Cultural.

Black Consciousness in South Africa provides a new perspective on black politics in South Africa. It demonstrates and assesses critically the radical character and aspirations of African resistance to white minority rule.Robert Fatton analyzes the development and radicalization of South Africa’s Black Consciousness Movement from its inception in the late 1960s to its banning in 1977. He rejects the widely accepted interpretation of the Black Consciousness Movement as an exclusively cultural and racial expression of African resistance to racism. Instead Fatton argues that over the course of its existence, the Movement developed a revolutionary ideology capable of challenging the cultural and political hegemony of apartheid. The Black Consciousness Movement came to be a synthesis of class awareness and black cultural assertiveness. It represented the ethico-political weapon of an oppressed class struggling to reaffirm its humanity through active participation in the demise of a racist and capitalist system.