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by Pauline Jones Luong

Free eBook The Transformation of Central Asia: States and Societies from Soviet Rule to Independence download ISBN: 0801488427
Author: Pauline Jones Luong
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (November 10, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 352
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1655 mb
Size FLAC: 1173 mb
Rating: 4.6
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Pauline Jones Luong teases out numerous important theoretical issues raised by the authors, juxtaposes .

Pauline Jones Luong teases out numerous important theoretical issues raised by the authors, juxtaposes them with the state of the art in the extant literature on Central Asia and comparative politics, and skillfully weaves the whole together. This is a pathbreaking collective effort in the emerging scholarship on Central Asia. Douglas Blum, Providence College). The contributors to this volume compare state-building and state-society interactions in the five post-Soviet Central Asian states.

Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2004. Most scholars viewed the region as a cotton colony of the Soviet Union dominated by a largely traditional, feudal society impervious to Western understanding. More recently, however, renewed interest in the Muslim world brought on by the war on terror has changed all of that.

Pauline Jones Luong, ed. The Transformation of Central Asia: States and . Besides Jones Luong?s introduction and conclusion, the book is divided into four parts of two chapters each. The Transformation of Central Asia: States and Societies from Soviet Rule to Independence. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2004. The introduction presents established perspectives for the study of post-Soviet states in Central Asia.

The sudden shift of global attention toward Central Asia in the aftermath of the terrorist strikes against the United States on September n, 2001, and the subsequent war in Afghanistan has revealed not only important factors affecting international security but also the enormous gap in our understanding of these factors. Until now, Central Asia has been treated as peripheral, both in the study of the Soviet Union and in the development of social science theory.

Experts on Central Asia here examine the emerging relationship between state actors and social forces in the region. Pauline Jones Luong is Associate Professor of Political Science at Yale University

Experts on Central Asia here examine the emerging relationship between state actors and social forces in the region. Through the prism of local institutions, the authors reassess both our understanding of Central Asia and of the state-building process more broadly. Pauline Jones Luong is Associate Professor of Political Science at Yale University. She is the author of Institutional Change and Political Continuity in Post-Soviet Central Asia: Power, Perceptions, and Pacts. Библиографические данные.

The transformation of Central Asia: States and societies from Soviet rule to independence. Politics in the periphery: competing views of Central Asian states and societies. Cornell University Press, 2004. Prelude to the resource curse: Explaining oil and gas development strategies in the Soviet successor states and beyond. PJ Luong, E Weinthal. Comparative Political Studies 34 (4), 367-399, 2001. The transformation of Central Asia: States and societies from Soviet rule t. 2004. Economic decentralization in Kazakhstan: causes and consequences.

With the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, former Communist Party leaders in Central Asia were faced with the daunting task of building states where they previously had not existed: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Their task was complicated by the institutional and ideological legacy of the Soviet system as well as by a more actively engaged international community. These nascent states inherited a set of institutions that included bloated bureaucracies, centralized economic planning, and patronage networks.

Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2004. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 27 January 2017.

Start by marking The Transformation of Central Asia as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Transformation of Central Asia as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. With the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, former Communist Party leaders in Central Asia were faced with the daunting task of building states where they previously had not existed: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

Politics in the periphery: competing views of Central Asian states and societies, Pauline Jones Luong - The retreat of the state: women and the social sphere.

With the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, former Communist Party leaders in Central Asia were faced with the daunting task of building states where they previously had not existed: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Their task was complicated by the institutional and ideological legacy of the Soviet system as well as by a more actively engaged international community. These nascent states inherited a set of institutions that included bloated bureaucracies, centralized economic planning, and patronage networks. Some of these institutions survived, others have mutated, and new institutions have been created.

Experts on Central Asia here examine the emerging relationship between state actors and social forces in the region. Through the prism of local institutions, the authors reassess both our understanding of Central Asia and of the state-building process more broadly. They scrutinize a wide array of institutional actors, ranging from regional governments and neighborhood committees to transnational and non-governmental organizations. With original empirical research and theoretical insight, the volume's contributors illuminate an obscure but resource-rich and strategically significant region.

User reviews
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
This book combines a number of interesting topics. Especially important is the topic of bride-kidnapping, but like everything else in modern academia this has to be white washed, therefore kidnapping and forced marriage and rape is called "non-consenual" which is a nice civilized term, but it implies the typical view of elite westerners, that no one is ever allowed to judge the 'other'. Therefore bride kidnapping is explained, which is better than not analyzing it, but there is no context, there is no voice of the woman and there is no analysis of why such a practice is inherently wrong.

Secondly there is an interesting discussion of language policy in Kazakhstan, but again there is little context of this. The Soviets transformed central Asia, they built states out of gatherings of tribes, they deported millions of Germans, Poles, Russians and Koreans to these lands, millions of Russians immigrated and most all the Soviet union gave written languages where only dialect had been, they also gave women equal rights and a say in the state. But they had their shortcomings, they maintained local elites by transforming local chiefs into soviet commisars.

But there is no context for this in these essays, there is no history, nothing that ties these countries to together. There is not one word about Islamism and the rise of terrorism, there is not one word on the fate of minorities, especially in Tajikistan. So in the end this book is mostly a failure, either that or it is mis-packaged, it should have just been called 'insights' into central Asia.

Seth J. Frantzman
Xanzay
The odds are good that if you are even looking at this book you'll be interested in something written in it. Its hard to know for sure though so let me ask you some questions.
Can you even name the five Post Soviet Central Asian countries?
Can you name 3 or 4 of the leaders from this region in the past 20 years?
Do you ever read academic texts?
Are you going to read this for fun instead of for class?
Can you stop reading a book, pick up another, and then go back to reading the first one?

If you answered no to any of these questions, I do strongly recommend you look at a version in your school or main public library before you buy it on Amazon. Its a dense book, even for people who are obsessed with the region and who like history and academic books.
That being said, the discussions that takes place are interesting and relevant, and if you are reading it for class is a great place to start getting ideas for papers (the Center Periphery stuff is great future research paper beginning every page or two).

If you do read this for fun you will probably enjoy it, because you enjoy finding out anything about the region. If you are reading it for class and do not know a whole lot about central asia, you will learn, but you may end up not wanting to study the region again.
But what do I know, the region wasnt on the menu when I was in college.
Milleynti
I was assigned this book as part of the reading for a class I took at Princeton on Central Asia. I have very mixed feelings about it.

Each section is written by a different author. Some are almost unreadable. Most chapters focus on very small (and often, seemingly unimportant) issues in state and society. At times it seems the authors are more concerned with citing each other (as indeed, every one of them does) than with teaching the reader about Central Asia

But worse, reading this book will give you no insight into the actual transformation of the region. If I had to single out the biggest problem with the book, it is the misleading title. Nowhere in this book will you find the history of Central Asia dealt with in a comprehensive--much less, thorough--way. I did not come away from it with a sense of the "transformation" of Central Asia.

What this book is good for, is learning about the contradictions and problems faced by the societies of the Central Asian Republics. All the same, I would counsel you against spending your money on this book.