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Free eBook The Scramble for African Oil: Oppression, Corruption and War for Control of Africa's Natural Resources (New Politics, Progressive Policy and Politics) download

by Douglas A. Yates

Free eBook The Scramble for African Oil: Oppression, Corruption and War for Control of Africa's Natural Resources (New Politics, Progressive Policy and Politics) download ISBN: 0745330452
Author: Douglas A. Yates
Publisher: Pluto Press (January 12, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 272
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1722 mb
Size FLAC: 1698 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: txt mbr rtf docx


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Africa is often seen as a place to be pitied or feared as an area of instability. Douglas A. Yates shows how the 'scramble' by the great powers for African oil has fed corruption and undermined democracy

Africa is often seen as a place to be pitied or feared as an area of instability. This book challenges these complacent assumptions, showing how our demand for. Yates shows how the 'scramble' by the great powers for African oil has fed corruption and undermined democracy. Yates documents how Africans have refused to remain passive in the face of such developments, forming movements to challenge this new attempt at domination. This book is an urgent challenge to our understanding of Africa, raising questions about the consequences of our reliance on foreign resources.

Yates proposes control of corruption through incentives for honesty as one strategy to reduce the harm caused by oil.

The Chad-Cameroon pipeline provides a case study in The Scramble for African Oil of the negative impact of oil wealth. Yates proposes control of corruption through incentives for honesty as one strategy to reduce the harm caused by oil.

Douglas A. Yates is Professor of International Relations & Diplomacy at the American Graduate School, International & Comparative Politics at the American University of Paris, and Anglo-American Law at the University of Cergy-Pontoise. His most recent book is The French Oil Industry and the Corps des Mines in Africa (2009). The Chad-Cameroon pipeline provides a case study in The Scramble for African Oil of the negative impact of oil wealth.

The Scramble for African Oil: Oppression, Corruption and War for Control of Africa's Natural Resources. BR BR Concluding with evidence of how Africans have refused to remain passive in the face of such developments, forming movements to challenge this new attempt at domination, this book challenges our understanding of Africa, raising questions about the consequences of our reliance on foreign resources.

African political chaos and discussesthoroughly Africa’s pressing political .

African political chaos and discussesthoroughly Africa’s pressing political governance issues, including the power thirstiness, leadership institution and the action of African Union (AU). The AU has improved its fragile reputation somewhat in recent years, but the challenges that Africa faces are still huge. The Politics of Reparations: The Academic Epistemic Communities and the Implications of Reparation Debate on African-American and Africa’s Quest for Reparations. Analysis of the Relationship between Oral Diseases and Glycemic Control of Diabetes in the West African Context: Survey at the Centre Anti-Diabétique d’Abidjan (CADA), Côte d’Ivoire.

The negative side effects of oil wealth in sub-Saharan Africa are well known. Paywall-free reading of new articles posted daily online and almost a century of archives. But Yates’ book fills in some gaps in the story with insightful details. The Scramble for African Oil: Oppression, Corruption and War for Control of Africa's Natural Resources. The negative side effects of oil wealth in sub-Saharan Africa are well known.

Yates acknowledges a new form of domination in neocolonialism, which keeps colonial patterns of collaboration . Chapter 10 offers potential solutions to the oil curse.

Yates acknowledges a new form of domination in neocolonialism, which keeps colonial patterns of collaboration through rentier states, kleptocracy, and praetorian regimes. He also recognises the foreign assistance through international organisations (IOs) and nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), but concedes the inability of IOs and NGOs to systematically end the oil curse through aid or good governance practices. At the core of this chapter is the need for control of corruption, and Yates spends a significant portion of the chapter explaining what corruption is and how it can be controlled.

The Journal of Modern African Studies. The Scramble for African Oil: Oppression, Corruption and War for Control of Africa's Natural Resources by D. A. Yates London: Pluto Press, 2012. Pp. 260. £1. 9 (pbk).

Yates documents how Africans Africa is often seen as a place to be pitied or feared .

Yates documents how Africans Africa is often seen as a place to be pitied or feared as an area of instability. This book challenges these complacent assumptions, showing how our demand for oil contributes to the chronic problems plaguing the continent. It will be vital reading for all those studying development and global political economy.

Africa is often seen as a place to be pitied or feared as an area of instability. This book challenges these complacent assumptions, showing how our demand for oil contributes to the chronic problems plaguing the continent.Douglas A. Yates shows how the 'scramble' by the great powers for African oil has fed corruption and undermined democracy. Yates documents how Africans have refused to remain passive in the face of such developments, forming movements to challenge this new attempt at domination.This book is an urgent challenge to our understanding of Africa, raising questions about the consequences of our reliance on foreign resources. It will be vital reading for all those studying development and global political economy.

User reviews
Wild Python
good book. you can tell it was well researched.
Zargelynd
A lot of interesting facts but tended to be slow at times.
Purestone
All in one volume: theory and cases
Hulis
The world economy runs on oil. A lot of it flows from the African nations on the Gulf of Guinea.

The Chad-Cameroon pipeline provides a case study in The Scramble for African Oil of the negative impact of oil wealth. This $3.7 billion dollar project brought together oil firms, the World Bank, governments and civil society to use Chad's oil revenues for peace, poverty alleviation and development. The risks involved in trusting a collapsed extractive state became apparent when Chad's government diverted oil money to buy weapons, having led the development community on a merry dance.

Yates describes Chad's President as "an authoritarian dictator who spends his oil revenues to cling violently to power." Sadly, Chad seems typical of African oil states whose kleptocratic rulers are supported by the rich world's thirst for oil. Oil states serve the interests of their elites and their customers, not their citizens. While the oil flows, such states are sustainable as military dictatorships. They may be failed, but they are viable, providing what Yates calls "fertile soil for evil men." The proportion of Nigerians living on less than a dollar a day nearly doubled between 1970 and 2008, from 38% to over 70%.

Yates proposes control of corruption through incentives for honesty as one strategy to reduce the harm caused by oil. But such incentives are impossible when ruling elites use the sovereignty of their captured and corrupted state as a shield. Sanctions against corruption include visa denial for travel to Europe and the USA and due diligence from banks. But such steps seem unlikely while rich nations are conflicted over commercial and developmental priorities. Direct distribution of oil revenues to the poor is another strategy Yates supports to promote democratic governance and broad based economic growth. Mobile phone technology can make such transfers transparent and efficient at scale.

Solving the oil curse will not be easy or rapid. Yates has written a superb exposé of some troubled and ignored nations. Oil could drive sustainable development, but in Africa it appears to be entrenching war and poverty.
Contancia
Peak oil production is currently predicted for 2025, showing that oil demand is only increasing as supplies are starting to run low. Pressures facing Africa only pushes existing problems further. Many call it the `oil curse', which affects countries that are major oil providers and often fall under the waves of corruption, usually implying highly interrelated dysfunctions with security, economic, governmental, and political systems. Douglas Yates takes a careful and scientific approach to analyze these countries and see how oil production and dependency plays in the hands of corruption and exploitation making it clear that "the oil curse is not necessary."

It is interesting that Yates views Africa and natural resources from different perspectives by looking at power from the top, and looking at power from the bottom. The roles of journalists, intellectuals, multinational corporations (with high interest in Africa), and power from the people are all taken into consideration to make the best judgment and case analysis.

To "unscramble the scramble for African oil", Yates says "You can't unscramble eggs." The corruption, war, and bloodshed can't be reversed, undone, or simply forgotten. "Any real search for solutions to the oil curse must begin with a clear understanding of what cannot be changed." He suggests that higher compensation should be given to civil servants to reward acts linked to transparent and honest acts, which would reduce the need and greed for corruption. To pair this, tougher penalties would be needed for acts linked with corruption.

I recommend this book to those looking to understand Africa, and perhaps a glimpse towards the future.