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Free eBook Working Women in Russia Under the Hunger Tsars: Political Activism and Daily Life (Scholarship in Women's History: Rediscovered and New) download

by Anne Bobroff-Hajal

Free eBook Working Women in Russia Under the Hunger Tsars: Political Activism and Daily Life (Scholarship in Women's History: Rediscovered and New) download ISBN: 0926019643
Author: Anne Bobroff-Hajal
Publisher: Carlson Pub; First Edition edition (December 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 326
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1838 mb
Size FLAC: 1897 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lit docx mobi txt


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Working Women in Russia Under the Hunger Tsars: Political Activism and Daily Life (Scholarship in Women's History : Rediscovered and New, No 3). ISBN. 0926019643 (ISBN13: 9780926019645). Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

She vividly discusses women's roles in food riots, street fighting and political activism, as well as in courtship and wedding rituals. Chapters 1 to 7, Anne Bobroff-Hajal, 'Working Women in Russia Under the Hunger Tsars'. Working Women in Russia under the Hunger Tsars: political activism and daily life,' by Anne Bobroff-Hajal One of the great puzzles of the February revolution is why, having initiated the revolution, working-class women were then unable to maintain this level of organisation in the upheavals of 1917.

political activism and daily life. by Anne Bobroff-Hajal. Published 1994 by Carlson Pub. in Brooklyn, . Revision of the author's thesis (Ph. -University of Michigan. Scholarship in women's history ;, v. 3. Classifications. Women, Social conditions, History, Employment.

Working women in Russia under the hunger tsars. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Bobroff-Hajal, Anne, Working Women in Russia Under the Hunger Tsars: Political Activism and Daily Life (Brooklyn, 1994). 17. Clements, Barbara Evans, Baba and Bolshevik: Russian Women and Revolutionary Change, Soviet Union/Union Sovietique, Vol. 12, Pt. 2, 1985, pp. 161-184, especially pp. 167-168; Working-Class and Peasant Women in the Russian Revolution, 1917-1923, Signs, Vol. 8, No. 2, 1982, pp. 215-235; and Bolshevik Women.

My Disillusionment in Russia - Emma Goldman - An.Working Women in Russia under the Hunger Tsars: political activism and daily life, by Anne Bobroff-Hajal

The Russian Tragedy - Alex Berkman - Analysis on the failure of the Russian revolution, written in 1922. Working Women in Russia under the Hunger Tsars: political activism and daily life, by Anne Bobroff-Hajal. See here for pdfs: Chapters 1 to 7.

Women’s history also teaches that one of the great political differences between Russia and the rest of Europe was the attempts by rulers, from Peter the Great onward, to engineer gender change in Russia. This intervention and public responses to it led in the later nineteenth century to an upsurge of political and social activism by women. Their activism drove revolutionary change forward before and during the Revolution and resulted in the implementation of a sweeping program of political, economic, and social emancipation for women in the 1920s.

The Russian Revolutions of 1917 saw the collapse of the Russian Empire, a short-lived provisional government, and the creation of the world's first socialist state under the Bolsheviks. They made explicit commitments to promote the equality of men and women. Many early Russian feminists and ordinary Russian working women actively participated in the Revolution, and all were affected by the events of that period and the new policies of the Soviet Union.

A revision of the author's Ph.D. dissertation (U. of Michigan). Focusing on women industrial workers before and during the Russian Revolution, most of them employed in textile production, Bobroff-Hajal finds that, despite acts of tremendous individual heroism and great physical and moral courage, women workers were usually active only sporadically and/or individually. Her thesis is that the particularly strong mother-child bonding of Russian women workers, to which they were indoctrinated from childhood on, undermined their ability to form coherent political groups capable of maintaining their identity over a long period of time. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.
User reviews
Kulwes
Bobroff-Hajal's well-researched study examines industrial workers in the central industrial region of Russia at the time of the 1917 revolutions. She discusses women's roles in food riots, street fighting, and political organizations, posing the issue of why so much activism was ultimately ineffective and why these Russian women were unable to form continuing organizations to better their lives. The explanation is somewhat repetitive: women were socialized through rituals and folklore to be tied to husbands and children rather than to each other, thus inhibiting any tendencies toward a natural interest group. More interesting, however, are the author's descriptions of working-class family and gender patterns, including childhood socialization, adolescence, courtship and wedding ritual, and communal living arrangements, which paradoxically managed to reinforce separation of nuclear families. Bobroff-Hajal uses fascinating folkloric, newspaper, memoir, and oral history sources not available in English to paint a vivid picture of the lives of these Russian women. A valuable addition to collections in Russian and women's history. Upper-division undergraduates and above. - L. Mayo, County College of Morris.
Hamrl
"We [are in the author's] debt for presenting Russian working women in a new manner, across the spectrum of everyday life from the painful rituals of coming-of-age to the confrontation they experienced with the limits placed on them by their families, Russian society and the tsarist state.... I hope this book finds the wide readership it deserves. It is a pathbreaker." - Martin A. Miller, Prof. of Russian History, Duke University.
"The publication of this pioneering work on the dispositions and roles of working women in revolutionary Russia is very much to be applauded... [the book] should be read with profit by a broad audience." - William G. Rosenberg, University of Michigan.