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Free eBook The Reagan Reversal: Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War download

by Beth A. Fischer

Free eBook The Reagan Reversal: Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War download ISBN: 0826211380
Author: Beth A. Fischer
Publisher: Univ of Missouri Pr (November 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 176
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1659 mb
Size FLAC: 1125 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: doc mbr rtf lit


Fischer understands the realities of foreign policy and international politics.

Fischer understands the realities of foreign policy and international politics. She has a political sense which enables her to connect domestic and world politics. I found it difficult to put down the book because of the unfolding story she narrates. She is a superb political analyst. - Kenneth W. Thompson. 15 people found this helpful.

She shows that Reagan, known for his long-standing antipathy toward communism, suddenly began calling for "dialogue, cooperation, and understanding" between the superpowers. This well-written and concise study challenges the conventional wisdom about the president himself and reveals that Reagan was, at times, the driving force behind United States-Soviet policy.

In The Reagan Reversal, Beth A. Fischer convincingly demonstrates that President Reagan actually began . Fischer convincingly demonstrates that President Reagan actually began seeking a rapprochement with the Kremlin fifteen months before Gorbachev took office. She shows that Reagan, known for his longstanding antipathy toward communism, suddenly began calling for "dialogue, cooperation, and understanding" between the superpowers. It is often assumed that Ronald Reagan's administration was reactive in bringing about the end of the cold war, that it was Mikhail Gorbachev's "new thinking" and congenial personality that led the administration to abandon its hard-line approach toward Moscow.

In The Reagan Reversal, Fischer sets out to closely study the weeks between October 3. .

In The Reagan Reversal, Fischer sets out to closely study the weeks between October 3, 1983, and January 16, 1984, to discover the reasons behind the sudden change of attitude towards the "evil empire. As a political scientist, rather than a political historian, Fischer proceeds very methodically. The book is unnecessarily repetitious, and Fischer repeats her main thesis in detail no less than four times, and in one place the use of theory detracts from her argument.

The Reagan Reversal: Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War. By Beth A. Fischer Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1997. Philip J. Briggs (a1). East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 01 August 2014.

He revived the B-1 Lancer program that had been canceled by the Carter administration, and began producing the MX missile. In response to Soviet deployment of the SS-20, Reagan oversaw the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO’s) deployment of the Pershing missile in West Germany. This well-written and concise study challenges the conventional wisdom about the president himself and reveals that Reagan was, at times, the driving force behind United States-Soviet policy

It is often assumed that Ronald Reagan's administration was reactive in bringing about the end of the Cold War, that it was . What caused such a reversal in policy? Fischer considers three explanations for the reversal.

It is often assumed that Ronald Reagan's administration was reactive in bringing about the end of the Cold War, that it was Mikhail Gorbachev's ""new thinking"" and congenial personality that led the administration to abandon its hard-line approach toward Moscow. In this study, the author demonstrates that President Reagan actually began seeking a rapprochement with the Kremlin fifteen months before Gorbachev even took office. First, it was an election year and public opinion had shifted, thus forcing the administration to become more moderate.

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See Beth A. Fischer, The Reagan Reversal: Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War (Columbia MO, 1997). This article disputes the assertions of the new Reagan literature

See Beth A. The EU, NATO and the Origins of CFSP & ESDP: Old Thinking, False Starts and New Imperatives. This article disputes the assertions of the new Reagan literature. Drawing upon radio broadcasts, speeches, correspondences, and documents from his presidential library, as well as recently published diaries from his White House years, it argues that Ronald Reagan had no grand strategy in the years 1976–1984. Indeed, throughout this period, he possessed two less-than-grand strategies I label peace through strength and a crusade for freedom.

It is often assumed that Ronald Reagan's administration was reactive in bringing about the end of the Cold War, that it was Mikhail Gorbachev's "new thinking" and congenial personality that led the administration to abandon its hard-line approach toward Moscow. In this study, the author demonstrates that President Reagan actually began seeking a rapprochement with the Kremlin fifteen months before Gorbachev even took office. She shows that Reagan, known for his long-standing antipathy toward communism, suddenly began calling for "dialogue, cooperation and understanding" between the superpowers. What caused such a reversal in policy? Fischer considers three explanations for the reversal. First, it was an election year and public opinion had shifted, thus forcing the administration to become more moderate. Second, new personnel, namely Secretary of State George Schultz and National Security Adviser Robert McFarlane, took control of US policy and made changes more in line with their personal views. Third, Reagan himself may have redirected US policy out of his fear of nuclear war. This last option is the explanation Fischer defends as most significant. In the fall of 1983, the Kremlin mistook a NATO military exercise for the preliminary stages of a nuclear strike and prepared to retaliate. After this narrowly avoided nuclear exchange, Reagan began to re-examine his views on nuclear war. This hypothesis, explains why the US policy was reversed, the timing of the shift, and the nature of the changes made. This study challenges the conventional wisdom about the president himself and reveals that Reagan was - at times - the driving force behind US-Soviet policy. "The Reagan Reversal" should stimulate new controversy among scholars concerning the end of the Cold War.