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Free eBook The Aerodrome: A Love Story download

by Rex Warner

Free eBook The Aerodrome: A Love Story download ISBN: 1566630258
Author: Rex Warner
Publisher: Ivan R. Dee (September 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 312
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1170 mb
Size FLAC: 1100 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: txt mbr doc lit


Perhaps one would argue that the love story here is merely a tool, that what this book is really about is something else but I don’t want to go that far, to spoil it for myself.

Perhaps one would argue that the love story here is merely a tool, that what this book is really about is something else but I don’t want to go that far, to spoil it for myself. Bringing love and fascism together in this way disturbs me. It tarnishes love, so I prefer to see these parallel elements of the story as offering a richness rather than a complex singularity. Warner’s observations of love seem to capture just about everything, and not only the obvious. Chapter 9, The Honeymoon

one observed walking-sticks with the handles worn smooth by the grip of a hand whose muscles had stiffened for the last time; indeed. These accidental and sudden reminders were hardly necessary. Everywhere in the house, it seemed to me, could be felt the influence and the presence of the one cold upstairs room in which the Rector's remains lay extended on a bed.

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Rex Warner (9 March 1905 – 24 June 1986) was an English classicist, writer and translator. He is now probably best remembered for The Aerodrome (1941)

Rex Warner (9 March 1905 – 24 June 1986) was an English classicist, writer and translator. He is now probably best remembered for The Aerodrome (1941). Warner was described by V. S. Pritchett as "the only outstanding novelist of ideas whom the decade of ideas produced". He was born Reginald Ernest Warner in Birmingham, England, and brought up mainly in Gloucestershire, where his father was a clergyman

Warner, Rex. ▪ British writer. born March 9, 1905, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died June 24, 1986, Wallingford, Oxfordshire. Warner wrote only one book of poetry, Poems (1937).

Warner, Rex. His translations from the Greek-particularly Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound (1947), Xenophon's Anabasis (1949), and Euripides' Hippolytus (1950) and Helen (1951)-are elegant, clear, and direct. Most notable of Warner's novels are The Professor (1938) and The Aerodrome (1941).

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First published in 1941, The Aerodrome is one of the few works of fiction in the twentieth century to understand the dangerous yet glamorous appeal of fascism an. .One of the few works of fiction in the 20th century to explore the dangerous yet glamorous appeal of fascism and the less than satisfactory answer of traditional democracy.

Rex Warner (1905–1986) was one of the most original English novelists of his time

Rex Warner (1905–1986) was one of the most original English novelists of his time.

Aerodrome – Rex Warner. Roy, coming of age in the messy, violent and adulterous world of the villagers, is simultaneously attracted and repelled by this strange place and by the powerful figure of the Air Vice-Marshal.

First published in 1941, The Aerodrome is one of the few works of fiction in the twentieth century to understand the dangerous yet glamorous appeal of fascism and the less than satisfactory answer of traditional democracy? and to transmute their deadly opposition into terms of enduring art. Mr. Warner brilliantly invents, on one side, a thoroughly degenerate Village representing fallen man, and on the other side a great Aerodrome dedicated to ruthless efficiency. The ideological struggle between the idealistic Air Vice-Marshal and the hero-narrator from the Village is portrayed with poetry, narrative speed, and great simplicity of language. It is a great symbolic novel of our time. "The value of The Aerodrome as literature becomes increasingly apparent at each rereading . . . an intensely original work."? Anthony Burgess. "A moral dialogue thrown into narrative form. It is humanity versus power, sprawling fife versus death-dealing regimentation. . . . A parable worth reading."? New York Times. "The beauty of his prose, unsurpassed by any living English writer, has nothing to do with `fine writing' but springs from a sound moral core and from an intelligence with the keenest edge."? C. Day Lewis.
User reviews
tref
Great Story but beware the low quality of the Elephant Paperbacks version. The pages just look copied from a smaller paperback version of this book with large margins left unused. They are not high quality copies either. They look off center and crooked. Perfectly readable but not high quality at all. A shame...because it is a high quality story. Sloppy book job.

Five stars for the story, One star for actual book quality. Try and find another edition if you can.
Dukinos
I was at Waterstones near Green Park in London when I asked the man at the counter who he would recommend. “I’m looking for something with a dark kind of mood,” I told him. “I’m a big fan of Paul Bowles, for example.” He nodded and pursed his lips and recommended Rex Warner’s The Aerodrome and Muriel Spark’s The Driver’s Seat. I got them both. Both are fantastic.

In my edition of The Aerodrome, A Love Story is featured as a subtitle of sorts, appearing (only) on the bottom right corner of the front page and then also on the title page of the book but not everywhere so I suppose it may not have been Warner’s idea but someone else’s. In any case, I found it appropriate because despite the central focus of fascism I see in all other reviews of the book, for me it was equally a story of romantic love.

Warner manages to capture so much of the boundless joy as well as the spellbinding confusion, illusion and panic that love often creates, that several times while reading it I had to lower the book and simply reflect on his ability and on the emotions he captures themselves. I suppose one could say that we may fall into fascism, given the right environment, the way we fall into love. As something that happens to us, as opposed to something we do, and in that sense, as something that we are essentially powerless over. Perhaps one would argue that the love story here is merely a tool, that “what this book is really about” is something else but I don’t want to go that far, to spoil it for myself. Bringing love and fascism together in this way disturbs me. It tarnishes love, so I prefer to see these parallel elements of the story as offering a richness rather than a complex singularity.

Warner’s observations of love seem to capture just about everything, and not only the obvious.

Chapter 9, The Honeymoon:

“When I held Bess in my arms, naked or clothed, I felt assured that I was laying hold of a brilliant, a better, an unexpected world, never thinking that I was doing only what every other man had done and what had finally satisfied nobody.”

We needn’t worry that this sentiment closed the book on Warner’s conception of love. In the end, love triumphs.
Aiata
Much as I hate to admit it now, I'd never heard of this book nor of Rex Warner until stumbling upon a list Anthony Burgess did for the New York Times Book Review of his Top 99 Modern Novels. The copy of the book I have just happens to include a forward by Burgess, so it seems safe to say that he did his part to maintain the reputation and readership of this fine book. And it was heartening to see that it is still in print. Heartening because this is a novel that deserves to be read and should have made many more "Best of" lists.
One strange deficiency in the literature of the 20th Century is the relative paucity of novels about fascism, its attractions and its awful consequences for those who believed. Sure, there are plenty of books about the Holocaust, but almost all are written from the victims' perspective. But while we have a rich literature depicting the mindset of Communists (Arthur Koestler, George Orwell, etc.), there aren't many similar books describing how someone, a young idealist perhaps, might have been drawn to fascism, even Nazism, but then been disillusioned, or even eaten by the revolution they helped to foment.
In at least this regard, Rex Warner's Aerodrome may well be the best novel ever written about fascism. The book is a pretty simple allegory--which though the critics I was able to find say was influenced mainly by Kafka, seemed to me to owe much more to Orwell's Coming Up for Air. The narrator, Roy, has grown up in The Village, a bucolic country town with more than its share of drunkenness, adultery, and incest. Bordering on the Village is the Aerodrome, clean, orderly, modern, technological, it represents everything that the Village is not.
Amidst a burgeoning mystery over who his real parents are, Roy joins the Air Force, drawn by its orderliness, attempting to please his girlfriend, and deeply impressed by the rigid but charismatic Air Vice-Marshal. The Vice-Marshal is determined to expand the Aerodrome and bring the Village under his control, remaking it in the same sterile image as the Aerodrome.
Roy meanwhile comes to realize that for all the disorder and human frailty on display in his home town, it is at least alive with possibilities :
I began to see that this life, in spite of its drunkenness and its inefficiency, was wider and deeper than the activity in which we were constricted by the iron compulsion of the Air Vice-Marshal's ambition. It was a life whose very vagueness concealed a wealth of opportunity, whose uncertainty called for adventure, whose aspects were innumerable and varied as the changes of light and colour throughout the year. It was a life whose unwieldiness was the consequence of its immensity. No skill could precisely calculate the effects of any action, and all action was dangerous.
There, in a nutshell, is the human dilemma : on the one hand we long for a world that would be safe and predictable and would yield to calculation, but, on the other, such calculations are beyond our meager mortal powers, so that whenever folks seek to impose order, they succeed merely in eliminating freedom and stifling progress. The appeal of fascism--or communism, or Nazism, or all the other -isms--is precisely that it holds out the promise of having finally invented the human calculus which will provide security, without any of the nasty side effects. That this appeal has always proven false does not seem to dampen the human need for, nor the responsiveness to, such promises.
Perhaps the best aspect of this novel is its timelessness. Though it is clearly a comment upon the 1930s and 40s, the Village, with its verdant fields, its convoluted genealogies, its interfamilial murders, and lurking just across the way the orderly utopia of the Aerodrome, suggests Man after the Fall as much as it does Britain just before WWII. The themes that Warner is dealing with are eternal. That he manages to present them in such a natural and readable way makes the book one that everyone should read.
GRADE : A+