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Free eBook The State and the Tributary Mode of Production download

by John F. Haldon

Free eBook The State and the Tributary Mode of Production download ISBN: 0860916618
Author: John F. Haldon
Publisher: Verso (March 17, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 350
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1709 mb
Size FLAC: 1603 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: azw lrf mobi rtf


For Haldon the relationship between the mode of production, politics, and ideology is much more complex. A thorough and very dense outline of a unitary theory of the tributary mode of production as a general category embracing medieval Europe, the Middle East and South Asia.

For Haldon the relationship between the mode of production, politics, and ideology is much more complex. The mode of production sets parameters and opens possibilities for change and development.

John Haldon is Professor of Byzantine History and Hellenic Studies at the University of Princeton. Theory As History: Essays on Modes of Production and Exploitation (Historical Materialism) Paperback. He is the author of Byzantine Praetorians, Byzantium in the Seventh Century and (in Greek) Marxism and Historiography.

Haldon argues that feudalism was the specifically European form of a much more widely diffused tributary mode, whose characteristic social relations and structural constraints can be seen at work in the Byzantine, Ottoman and Mughal empires as well

Haldon argues that feudalism was the specifically European form of a much more widely diffused tributary mode, whose characteristic social relations and structural constraints can be seen at work in the Byzantine, Ottoman and Mughal empires as well. While acknowledging the range of ideological and cultural variation within and between these examples of the tributary mode, Haldon denies the thesis that such superstructural variations themselves yielded fundamentally contrasting social relations.

Mode of Production Social Formation and th. Tributary States Ruling Elites and State Autonomy. 140. State Formation and the Struggle for Surplus. 203. Absolute or Relative Autonomy?

Mode of Production Social Formation and the. 87. The Byzantine Paradigm. Absolute or Relative Autonomy?

The Asiatic mode of production has been the subject of much discussion by. Haldon, John (1994). The State and the Tributary Mode of Production. Wickham, Chris (2005).

Haldon, John (1994).

Includes bibliographical references (p. -339) and index.

The State and the Tributary Mode of Production.

In this groundbreaking critique of both traditional and Marxist notions of feudalism and of the pre-capitalist state, John Haldon considers the configuration of state and social relations in medieval Europe and Mughal India as well as in Byzantium and the Ottoman Empire. He argues that a Marxist reading of the pre-capitalist state can take account of the autonomy of power relations and avoid economic reductionism while still focusing on the forms of tribute which sustained the ruling power. Haldon explores the conflicts to which these gave rise and shows the Ottoman state elite, often held to be a clear example of independence from underlying social relations, to be deeply enmeshed in economic relationships and the extraction of tribute.Haldon argues that feudalism was the specifically European form of a much more widely diffused tributary mode, whose characteristic social relations and structural constraints can be seen at work in the Byzantine, Ottoman and Mughal empires as well. While acknowledging the range of ideological and cultural variation within and between these examples of the tributary mode, Haldon denies the thesis that such “superstructural” variations themselves yielded fundamentally contrasting social relations.