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Free eBook Counterrevolution: The Role of the Spaniards in the Independence of Mexico, 1804-38 download

by Romeo Flores Caballero,Jaime E. Rodriguez O.

Free eBook Counterrevolution: The Role of the Spaniards in the Independence of Mexico, 1804-38 download ISBN: 0803208057
Author: Romeo Flores Caballero,Jaime E. Rodriguez O.
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press; First Edition first Printing edition (May 1, 1974)
Language: English
Pages: 277
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1520 mb
Size FLAC: 1702 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: doc azw docx rtf


Counterrevolution book. Jaime E. Rodríguez O. (Translation).

Counterrevolution book.

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Bibliographic Details. Southampton Books is located in the village of Southampton, New York on Long Island. We sell both new and collectible books

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: University of Nebraska Press. Publication Date: 1974. We sell both new and collectible books. Visit Seller's Storefront. Terms of Sale: We offer a 30 day money back guarantee if you are unhappy with your purchase for any reason or if you decided you no longer need the purchased book.

Flores Caballero, Romeo, Counterrevolution: The Role of the Spaniards in the Independence of Mexico, 1804–38. Rodríguez . (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1974). Fowler, Will, Mexico in the Age of Proposals, 1821–1853 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1998). Freeden, Michael, Ideologies and Political Theory: A Conceptual Approach (Oxford: University of Oxford Press, 1996).

Counterrevolution : The Role of the Spaniards in the Independence of Mexico, 1804-1838. by Romeo Flores Caballero. Select Format: Hardcover.

book by Romeo Flores Caballero. Counterrevolution : The Role of the Spaniards in the Independence of Mexico, 1804-1838. Select Condition: Like New.

Jaime Rodríguez's massive and masterful study of Mexican independence constitutes the culmination of a lifetime dedicated to the topic. "This book will truly constitute a landmark study in the historiography of Mexico. I find so much to admire in this work that it's difficult to know where to begin. Rodríguez's command of the period, its issues, and its colorful details gives his work the resolution power of the Hubble space telescope, and reading We Are Now the True Spaniards, at times, gives one the feel of clearly seeing a distant world for the first time. This book will truly constitute a landmark study in the historiography of Mexico. Its revisionist position will change our view of Spain and the process of independence in its trans-Atlantic realms.

Rodríguez shifts the entire independence process in Mexico back in time to. .Fortunately, Jaime E. Rodriguez O. has written a seminal book in which h.

Rodríguez shifts the entire independence process in Mexico back in time to the 1808–1812 period, exiles structuralist inevitability, and assumes open fields of political information and decision-making. Eric Van Young, University of California San Diego). Rodríguez, the living soul of the revisionist revolution in the study of Latin American independence, demonstrates that the story of Mexican independence is the story of a transatlantic political revolution that, as a byproduct, produced separation between Mexico and Spain. has written a seminal book in which he explains the mystery.

Romeo R. Flores Caballero, Counterrevolution: The Role of the Spaniards in the Independence of Mexico, 1804–38 (1974), pp. 47-142. Michael P. Costeloe, La Primera República Federal de México, 1824–1835 (1975), pp. 178-274. The Emergence of Spanish America: Vicente Rocafuerte and Spanish Americanism, 1808–1832 (1975), esp. pp. 210-228. Stanley C. Green, The Mexican Republic: The First Decade, 1823–1832 (1987), pp. 140-209. Additional Bibliography. Martínez del Campo, Silvia. Planeta Mexicana, 2005.

By Jaime E. No cover image. During its final decades under Spanish rule, New Spain was the most populous, richest, and most developed part of the worldwide Spanish Monarchy, and most novohispanos (people of New Spain) believed that their religious, social, economic, and political ties to the Monarchy made union preferable to separation.

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Book by Flores Caballero, Romeo