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Free eBook CCTV and Policing: Public Area Surveillance and Police Practices in Britain (Clarendon Studies in Criminology) download

by Benjamin J. Goold

Free eBook CCTV and Policing: Public Area Surveillance and Police Practices in Britain (Clarendon Studies in Criminology) download ISBN: 0199265143
Author: Benjamin J. Goold
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (May 6, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 264
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1949 mb
Size FLAC: 1241 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: docx azw lit txt


CCTV and Policing is the first major published work to present a comprehensive assessment of the impact of CCTV on the police in Britain.

CCTV and Policing is the first major published work to present a comprehensive assessment of the impact of CCTV on the police in Britain. In addition, the volume also provides a detailed analysis of the legality of CCTV surveillance in light of recent changes to the Data Protection Act and the incorporation of the European Convention on Human Rights.

This book is the first major published work to present a comprehensive assessment of the impact of CCTV on the police in Britain. In addition, the volume.

CCTV and Policing is the first major published work to present a comprehensive assessment of the . About the author (2004). Benjamin Goold has been Lecturer in Law at both Corpus Christi College and New College, Oxford.

CCTV and Policing considers how the introduction of closed circuit television (CCTV) has affected policing practices in Britain.

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Public Area Surveillance and Police Practices in Britain. Clarendon Studies in Criminology. Presents findings from the first major empirical study of police use of CCTV in Britain

Public Area Surveillance and Police Practices in Britain. Presents findings from the first major empirical study of police use of CCTV in Britain. Challenges mainstream thinking about how the police use surveillance technologies. Engages with the issue of privacy rights and public spaces. Includes a reconsideration of existing British and European privacy law and how may be applied to emerging surveillance technologies like CCTV. Public Area Surveillance and Police Practices in Britain.

By Benjamin . oold (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004, 244pp. Published: 2 August 2004. by Oxford University Press (OUP). in British Journal of Criminology. British Journal of Criminology, Volume 45, pp 234-236; doi:10. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

CCTV and policing: Public area surveillance and police practices in Britain. Loftus, . & Goold, B. (2012). Covert surveillance and the invisibilities of policing.

Goold, B. & Lazarus, L. (2007). Security and human rights (1st e. Oxford; Portland, Or: Hart. Goold, B. & Oxford Scholarship Online Law. (2004). CCTV and policing: Public area surveillance and police practices in Britain. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press. Idealizing the other? western images of the Japanese criminal justice system. Criminology & Criminal Justice, 12(3), 275-288.

Clarendon studies in criminology. The impact of CCTV: fourteen case studies. Library availability.

Policing is in a state of transformation. Goold B (2004) CCTV and policing: public area surveillance and police practices in Britain. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar. Graham S (2001) CCTV: the stealthy emergence of a fifth utility? Plan Theory Prac 3(2):237–41Google Scholar. Koskela H (2011) Hijackers and humble servants: individuals as camwitnesses in contemporary controlwork. Theor Criminol 15(3):269–282Google Scholar.

CCTV and Policing considers how the introduction of closed circuit television (CCTV) has affected policing practices in Britain. Based on original field research, the volume examines the various factors that have shaped police CCTV use, and challenges claims that the spread of public area CCTV is indicative of a movement towards increasingly authoritarian forms of policing.