» » Who Owns Death? Capital Punishment, the American Conscience, and the End of Executions

Free eBook Who Owns Death? Capital Punishment, the American Conscience, and the End of Executions download

by Robert J. Lifton,Greg Mitchell

Free eBook Who Owns Death? Capital Punishment, the American Conscience, and the End of Executions download ISBN: 038079246X
Author: Robert J. Lifton,Greg Mitchell
Publisher: Harper Perennial; Perennial ed. edition (January 22, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1724 mb
Size FLAC: 1758 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: docx lit rtf lrf


So authors Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell will raise eyebrows when they write: "We believe . .For me this book was far more than just a book about the death penalty.

So authors Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell will raise eyebrows when they write: "We believe will come to an end fairly soon. It was also a series case studies in how it is possible, and vastly preferable, to try to understand other people's points of view when they are different to one's own, rather than condemning them because they happen to see the world in a somewhat different way.

Who Owns Death? book. Highly topical and provocative, Who Owns Death? is unique in exploring the mindset of those who play some role in executions—including prison wardens, prosecutors, jurors, judges, and relatives of murder victims, many of whom reveal surprising doubts about, even opposition to, state killing. Indeed, in a sure-to-be controversial conclusion, the authors predict that executions in America will come to an end in the near future.

Lifton, Robert Jay, 1926-; Mitchell, Greg, 1947 .

Lifton, Robert Jay, 1926-; Mitchell, Greg, 1947-. The pope's travel plans: three states, three views of the death penalty - Executions in America: trends and beginnings - Methods of execution: seeking a "humane" end, from noose to needle - Wardens and guards, chaplains and doctors - Prosecutors and governors - Jurors and judges - Witnessing - Murder victim's families -. Public opinion, private doubts - The end of executions.

Lifton, Robert Jay, 1926-; Mitchell, Greg. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on November 15, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

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by Greg Mitchell and Robert Jay Lifton. In this timely book, Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell investigate the mindsets of individuals involved in the death penalty - including prison wardens, prosecutors, jurors, religious figures, governors, judges, and relatives of murder victims - and offer a textured look at a system that perpetuates the longstanding American habit of violence.

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Pre-owned: lowest price. The item may have some signs of cosmetic wear, but is fully operational and functions as intended. This item may be a display model or store return that has been used. See details for description of any imperfections.

In this book, Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell, take an unusual approach to the issue. By exploring the mind-sets of those directly involved in the death penalty, including prison wardens, prosecutors, jurors, religious figures, govenors, judges, and relatives of murder victims, they offer a textured look at a system that perpetuates the long-standing American habit of violence. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Who Owns Death? By Greg Mitchell and Robert Jay Lifton

Who Owns Death? By Greg Mitchell and Robert Jay Lifton. In eloquent detail, Lifton and Mitchell indict the randomness and cruelty of executions and the heavy burden they place on the souls of those who prosecute, defend, and sit as judges and jurors, and those who participate in the process of putting someone to death. - Los Angeles Times.

By Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell. Robert Jay Lifton is a psychiatrist who has written extensively about state violence, different attitudes to death and the psychology of survivors. In The Nazi Doctors: Medical Killing and the Psychology of Genocide (Basic Books and Macmillan, 1986), he studied how medicine was perverted to political ends. The book begins with a history of executions, the methods that have been used and the patterns of conviction.

In this timely book, Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell investigate the mindsets of individuals involved in the death penalty -- including prison wardens, prosecutors, jurors, religious figures, governors, judges, and relatives of murder victims -- and offer a textured look at a system that perpetuates the longstanding American habit of violence.

Richly rewarding and meticulously researched, Who Owns Death? explores the history of the death penalty in the United States, from hanging to lethal injection, and considers what this search for more "humane" executions reveals about us as individuals and as a society... and what the future of the death penalty holds for us all.

User reviews
Kegal
This book explores the death penalty. It delves into a lot of the misconceptions that surround common beliefs about putting citizens to death. I am doing my PhD thesis on the death penalty and am using this as one of my references. I started reading it and could not put it down. This book is a must read for anyone who wants to understand how the DP came about and why we are one of the few country's that still support it.
Aver
Great!
Thofyn
I can honestly describe this as a book that changed my life, although perhaps not in quite the manner that might be expected. Prior to reading this book I felt passionately hostile towards capital punishment in America. It seemed to me to be the ultimate abberation and hypocracy that the country that prided itself as a champion of freedom could do this to its citizens. I felt sympathy for the plight of at least some of those who found themselves accused of murder (rightly or wrongly) and who were facing the death penalty; and deep hatred, distrust, and animosity towards those who supported this cruel and inhumane practice.

At the same time I was dimly aware that my attitude was at least a little unbalanced. I knew that there were many ordinary folk in America, the UK and elsewhere who supported the death penalty, and I knew that it was unhealthy and unbalanced for me to be hating them so much on account of this....

From the outset this book expresses understanding and compassion for the families of murder victims who may support the application of the death penalty to the person who (allegedly) murdered their loved one. The authors acknowledge that they would probably initially feel similarly if someone were to murder one of their friends or relatives, but that on reflection they would take a principled stand against such a course of action.

Rather than villifying those who support the death penalty, the authors seek to understand them and why they think as they do, looking in turn at different groups involved in the death penalty process. It also seeks to understand the point of view of people within each group who were against the death penalty, or ambivalent. The result is an astonishing analysis and insight into the motivations that lie behind these differing points of view. The reader is enabled to develop compassion and understanding for all participants, and to appreciate the emotional toll that the death penalty process has on everyone involved in it. The reader is led to the unavoidable conclusion that the death penalty inflicts suffering not just on the alleged perpertrator, but on everyone involved in the process from the prison wardens to the members of the jury.

One of the many insightful conclusions reached is that support for the death penalty is frequently based more on support for the idea of the death penalty - as an expression of zero tolerance towards evil - rather than towards the reality of applying the death penalty to a particular person. When it comes to the latter people tended to be far more equivocal, especially when the option of life inprisonment was suggested as an alternative option.

One of the many things that this book taught me was the value of trying to understand the point of view of people who think differently to me about these sort of subjects. A few years after reading this book there was a very sad case of a man from Bristol who had become intensely jealous and distrustful of his wife while on holiday with her in Greece and had thrown his son out of a balcony before jumping out himself with his daugter in his arms. His son was killed, but both he and his daugher survived. It transpired that he had a history of mental health problems.

I was working in Bristol at the time and a colleage of mine said he believed in the death penalty and thought the man should be executed. Rather than feeling offended and rushing to contradict him as I might have done before reading this book, I chose to try to gently sound him out on the matter. "It won't really stop that sort of thing from happening" I said. "No it won't" he said, his tone immediately softening.

For me this book was far more than just a book about the death penalty. It was also a series case studies in how it is possible, and vastly preferable, to try to understand other people's points of view when they are different to one's own, rather than condemning them because they happen to see the world in a somewhat different way. It is a book that has changed my own life for the better by giving me the motivation and the tools to seek to understand others rather than judging them. I will always be grateful to the authors for what they have done for me personally through writing this book; as well as what they have done for the debate surrounding capital punishment.
Agalen
I was a bit disappointed in this book because the dust jacket states the authors attempted to write a unbiased book covering the people that are part of the capital punishment process in America. Maybe it is that the authors stance on the death penalty is so strong that it is all they could do to be as objective as they were, but I was still looking for an unbiased account. With that said I did learn a lot from the book, I also agree with the author's position on the death penalty so their position was not that hard to take. I just wanted more of the other side represented so that I could learn more about that point of view.
The most eye opening part of the book is just the raw data on how many people are currently on death row and how many people have been taken off death row after being proven innocent. The authors also take the reader through all the people associated with the death penalty for interviews. From Judges and juries to the prison guards and executioners, all get a say in the book. What was interesting is that the authors did not present any really gun ho, hang them high types, all the people seamed down to earth and a little uneasy about the whole process. I think there is such a primitive law and order feeling associated with the states power to end a life that I do not think the authors are correct that the death penalty is coming to an end in America - it just appeals to too much of the population.
Overall this is an interesting and eye-opening book. If you are interested in the personal side of the death penalty then this is a good place to start. It did slow down at the end and again I would have liked a little more unbiased writing if only to hold the book out as an example of an unbiased report pushing for the end to the death penalty.
Shaktiktilar
I found this book a good read and would recommend it.
One major objective of this book is to show capitol punishment from all angles. They talk about he prosecutors, the jurors, the judge, the executioners, the governors, and all other cogs in the system. By the time they are done, they make a convincing argument that this process is so fractionalized that nobody feels ultimate responsibility for this grave action (which helps keep it alive).
It also explores people's "support" for capitol punishment. You come to realize that the *objective* of a lot of supporters is keeping the criminal off the street, not vengeance. Thus, when given the option of life without parole, the support for capitol punishment drops below 50%.
I feel that there was a lot of "On one hand... then on the other hand... but you have to remember... and it is important not to discount...".
Although they referenced many polls and facts, I would have preferred this to be a little more 'scientific' and less philosophical. Also in their effort to explor all sides of this issue, many of their statements are pretty obvious -- for example, victim families what vengence and 'closure'. Duh.
I found the style to be a little odd. One of the writers is a journalist and the book is written accordingly. One one hand, they try to be even-handed showing all sides, while on the other, they write with the base assumption that capitol punishment is wrong. I did not find this confusing, but it was a little odd.
I don't wish these comments to discourage people -- it is a worthwhile read, but it does have a few shortcommings.