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Free eBook Shakedown: How Our Government is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights download

by Ezra Levant

Free eBook Shakedown: How Our Government is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights download ISBN: 0771046197
Author: Ezra Levant
Publisher: McClelland & Stewart; First Edition edition (October 27, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1277 mb
Size FLAC: 1275 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: lit txt lrf mbr


While Shakedown is primarily about Ezra Levant's three-year struggle against the AHRC, Mr. Levant also takes a. .Really opened my eyes to an otherwise free society that has turned to censorship all in the name of "human rights".

While Shakedown is primarily about Ezra Levant's three-year struggle against the AHRC, Mr. Levant also takes a considerable amount of time to document other such abuses by similar commissions all across Canada. By doing so, he demonstrates how this mindless pursuit of "human rights" has in fact done the exact opposite.

It shows how our concept of human rights has morphed into something dangerous and drastically different from its original meaning. Shakedown is a convincing plea to Canadians to reclaim their basic liberties.

Mobile version (beta). Shakedown: How Our Government Is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights. Download (epub, 208 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

But Ezra Levant introduces us very quickly to Canadian notions of Orwell’s thoughtcrime, in a wildly perverse laundry-list of abuses in the human rights industry.

Levant points out the irony of the human rights commissions' penchant for punishing one group for its views while not cracking down on others.

Shakedown: How Our Government is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights Although this book was written about Human Rights' Councils in Canada, it sends a clarion call to citizens of the United States who cherish our Bill of Rights and want to protect it from th.

Shakedown: How Our Government is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights Although this book was written about Human Rights' Councils in Canada, it sends a clarion call to citizens of the United States who cherish our Bill of Rights and want to protect it from the Nanny State. If we think that this cannot happen in the United States, we only have to look recent events in . America - PLEASE READ THIS IF YOU VALUE YOUR FREEDOM. com User, April 13, 2009.

In Shakedown, Ezra Levant reveals: How, as real discrimination has waned, Canadian human rights . How, since Levant began his investigations, his opponents within the human rights industry have tried to smear him as an opponent of human rights.

In Shakedown, Ezra Levant reveals: How, as real discrimination has waned, Canadian human rights commissions (HRCs) have shifted into the field of what George Orwell called thoughtcrime. How these commissions now routinely monitor political opinions, fine people for expressing politically incorrect viewpoints, and even ban people - permanently –from saying certain things.

Shakedown: How Our Government is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights by Ezra Levant. Shakedown, a fictional supervillain in the DC Universe who is a member of Masters of Disaster. Shakedown (Snowboard Games), rider-driven snowboard event. This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Shakedown.

As Levant relates in Shakedown - his recently published book on the . And, thanks to Ezra Levant, it is a discussion that Canadians from coast to coast are having

As Levant relates in Shakedown - his recently published book on the human rights commissions - he honestly didn't think he'd have to spend more than five minutes dealing with what he really thought - as a reasonable, law-abiding Westerner living in what he considered a "free country" - was a mere "bureaucratic formality. Because in the curious world of the human rights commissions, the accused has to defend himself out-of-pocket, while the accuser gets his bills footed by the government. And, thanks to Ezra Levant, it is a discussion that Canadians from coast to coast are having. I tip my hat to the man and heartily recommend his book.

human rights commissions. Pick up a copy of Ezra Levant’s Shakedown.

Winner of the Writer’s Trust of Canada, Samara’s – Best Canadian Political Book of the Last 25 Years Part memoir, part investigative journalism, this is a shocking and controversial look at the corruption of Canada’s human rights commissions. On January 11, 2008, I was summoned to a 90-minute government interrogation. This otherwise pompous right-wing blowhard looks like a saint when he runs up against the Human Rights Tribunals’ thought police.

Winner of the Writer's Trust of Canada / Samara's - Best Canadian Political Book of the Last 25 Years Part memoir, part investigative journalism, this is a shocking and controversial look at the corruption of Canada’s human rights commissions.“On January 11, 2008, I was summoned to a 90-minute government interrogation. My crime? As the publisher of Western Standard magazine, I had reprinted the Danish cartoons of Mohammed to illustrate a news story. I was charged with the offence of “discrimination,” and made to appear before Alberta’s “human rights commission” for questioning. As crazy as it sounds, I became the only person in the world to face legal sanction for printing those cartoons.”As a result of this highly publicized event, Ezra Levant began investigating other instances in which innocent people have had their freedoms compromised by bureaucrats presuming to protect Canadians’ human rights. He discovered some disturbing and even bizarre cases, such as the tribunal ruling that an employee at a McDonald’ s restaurant in Vancouver did not have to wash her hands at work. And the human rights complaint filed by a Calgary hair stylist against the women at a salon school who called him a “loser.” In another case that seemed stranger than fiction, an emotionally unstable transvestite fought for — and won — the right to counsel female rape victims, despite the anguished pleas of those same traumatized victims. Human rights commissions now monitor political opinions, fine people for expressing politically incorrect viewpoints, censor websites, and even ban people, permanently, from saying certain things. The book is a result of Levant’s ordeal and the research it inspired. It shows how our concept of human rights has morphed into something dangerous and drastically different from its original meaning. Shakedown is a convincing plea to Canadians to reclaim their basic liberties.From the Hardcover edition.
User reviews
Wiliniett
To partially borrow a phrase from Jonah Goldberg, if fascism ever came to the Western Democracies, it would come not from brownshirts pounding on your doorstep, but lawyers carrying subpoenas issued by faceless, unelected, and unaccountable bureaucrats. This is exactly the nightmare that Ezra Levine faced in Canada, when he was forced to give account before a government agency for doing something that most people in the west take for granted: speaking his mind.

The government agency for which he was hauled before - the Alberta Human Rights Commission - had started out innocently enough, as a place of legal recourse for people who felt that they had been discriminated against in housing and employment, but did not have the means for which to pursue a grievance. But somewhere along the way, its mission became perverted. It took an expansive view of its mandate to pursue "human rights", and began to pursue people based not on their actions, but on what they said or wrote - classifying anything that they deemed as "hate speech" as a human rights violation, and therefore subject to their investigations and sanctions. In other words, they became thought police, with astonishing powers to pursue a target, and whose victims soon found that they had very little legal recourse but to give in to the AHRC's "remedies".

This is what happens when government is allowed to run unchecked, when government agencies take it upon themselves to be the arbiter of what its citizens can and cannot do. This book is a wake-up call for how government, even with the best of intentions, can step in and take away people's freedoms in the name of the "greater good", and how little anyone can do to stop them. While Shakedown is primarily about Ezra Levant's three-year struggle against the AHRC, Mr. Levant also takes a considerable amount of time to document other such abuses by similar commissions all across Canada. By doing so, he demonstrates how this mindless pursuit of "human rights" has in fact done the exact opposite. In a larger sense, he is sounding the alarm for how it is that government can take away basic freedoms, and especially how easily a small cadre of extremist radicals can subvert the system and impose their will and values on everyone with relatively little impunity. The thin-skinned and easily offended barbarians are at the helm, and they bristle at the notion that Mr. Levant can have the nerve to counter their arguments with, "Because it is my bloody right to."

Although Mr. Levant is conservative, this book should not be construed as "just a typical right wing diatribe against the abuses of the left". It actually transcends notions of Left vs. Right, Liberal vs. Conservative, and Mr. Levant takes considerable pains to point this out. The abuses that Mr. Levant outlines in his book could just as easily have happened from a right-wing junta as it did from a left-wing truth commission. The point is not the political ideologies involved, but the notion of government intrusion into our individual liberties - in this case, free speech. It is a sobering and frightening look at how easily we allow our basic freedoms to be handed over and compromised by an all-powerful, all-encompassing State, and the consequences of doing so. Something that every person who values their freedom to consider, as we live in this day and age of steadily growing government power.
Narim
Shakedown: How Our Government is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights

Although this book was written about Human Rights' Councils in Canada, it sends a clarion call to citizens of the United States who cherish our Bill of Rights and want to protect it from the Nanny State. If we think that this cannot happen in the United States, we only have to look recent events in U.S. history. Our government is paving the way with special laws for hate crimes. We are already elevating one group (in each case of hate crimes) above others when prosecuting hate crimes. Every crime is already covered by U.S. law - after all a crime is a crime, but to say one crime is worse than others, because the victim belongs to a particular segment of society, is to dilute the value of the law in every instance that is not labeled a hate crime. So watch out - it is already happening in the U.S. This books gives an excellent picture of what will happen if we let the government busybodies have their way.
Stoneshaper
I'll add my five stars to the six unanimously-five-star reviews already here as I write this on 5/25/2009. I'm pleased to see that half of those six are from American readers, and, indeed, several prior reviewers make the point that Ezra Levant's book is as important for Americans as for Canadians.

Since the previous reviewers say plenty about the book, I'll first add that there's tons more material, constantly updated, at Ezra Levant's website, ezralevant.com . Especially illuminating, I think, are many of the videos there.

Of course the most famous and most important of the videos are the ones of his interrogation before the Alberta provincial Human Rights [sic] Commission. Unfortunately, it appears to be impossible to place the URL for the interrogation videos here on this Amazon page. (There are nine of them at YouTube, with aggregate length about 45 minutes, I'll estimate.) So just Google on "I don't answer to the state" and you'll find the one of the nine with that title as your top hit, along with the eight companion videos accessed by links on the right margin of that web page.

View some or all of those, especially "Opening Statement," and decide if you want to read the book. Probably "yes"!

Why get the book if there's all that available for free on the Internet? The book tells the essential story in a very organized manner, helped by the fact that Levant is a splendid writer, at once both serious and humorous.

One other thing to add about implications for Americans: As others have written here, we already have some "hate crime" laws on the books, with more in prospect. However, the closer current American analogy to what Ezra Levant has endured in Canada is probably the plague of speech codes on our college and university campuses, even the public ones. You can delve into that at the website of FIRE (the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education), whose URL is thefire.org .
Velan
I highly suggest anyone interested in Free Speech read any of Ezra Levant's books. This guy puts it on the line and is very brave to challenge the Liberal Elite and threats to Western society on a number of current topics.
Cordantrius
Wenes
Really opened my eyes to an otherwise free society that has turned to censorship all in the name of "human rights"
Ueledavi
Must have for your art Library
This book is good - but I dare say it could have sent the same strong message in less pages - not that the book is long - the message is just very searing and very straightforward and needed less space to thrive.