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Free eBook Medici Women: Portraits of Power, Love, and Betrayal in the Court of Duke Cosimo I download

by Gabrielle Langdon

Free eBook Medici Women: Portraits of Power, Love, and Betrayal in the Court of Duke Cosimo I download ISBN: 0802095267
Author: Gabrielle Langdon
Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 1 edition (September 29, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 480
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1172 mb
Size FLAC: 1852 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: mbr docx mobi lit


Portraiture especially served the dynastic pretensions of the absolutist ruler, Duke Cosimo and his consort, Eleonora di Toledo, and was part of a Herculean programme of propaganda to establish legitimacy and prestige for the new sixteenth-century Florentine court. Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication Langdon, Gabrielle Medici women: portraits of power, love and betrayal from the court of Duke Cosimo I, Gabrielle Langdon. Includes bibliographical references and index. isbn 978-0-8020-3825-8 (bound). isbn 978-0-802527-5 (pb.

Briefly put, Medici Women is a thorough study of portraits of Medici women at the court of Duke Cosimo I. Langdon not only brings to light a plethora of information about these women (and their portraits), but also rediscovers long-lost portraits and convincingly identifies a number o. . Langdon not only brings to light a plethora of information about these women (and their portraits), but also rediscovers long-lost portraits and convincingly identifies a number of sitters who were previously misidentified or not identified at all. For these reasons alone, the book makes an important contribution to scholarship, and greatly advances our understanding of these women's role in the dynastic strategies of the Medici family

Start by marking Medici Women: Portraits of Power, Love, and Betrayal from the Court of Duke Cosimo I as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In this engaging and original study, Gabrielle Langdon analyses selected portraits of women by Jacopo Pontormo .

In this engaging and original study, Gabrielle Langdon analyses selected portraits of women by Jacopo Pontormo, Agnolo Bronzino, Alessandro Allori, and other masters. She defines their function as works of art, as dynastic declarations, and as encoded documents of court culture and propaganda, illuminating Cosimo's conscious fashioning of his court portraiture in imitation of the great courts of Europe.

This is a study of Medici women, especially their portraits, read in and against the mythologies of court culture

This is a study of Medici women, especially their portraits, read in and against the mythologies of court culture. Gabrielle Langdon reads female portraiture as a pictorial strategy inseparable from other propagandistic programs of the sixteenth- century Florentine court of Duke Cosimo I and his wife, Eleonora di Toledo. Langdon recognizes an intricate and extensive effort to celebrate the legitimacy of Medici rule and to perpetuate the power of the dynasty, asking from the start, Where, exactly, did women’s portraiture fit in the wider scheme of Medici ambitions and what forms did it take?

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Published by: University of Toronto Press. Book Description: Lavishly illustrated,Medici Women: Portraits of Power, Love and Betrayal in the Court of Duke Cosimo Iis an indispensable work for anyone with a passion for Italian renaissance history, art, and court culture. eISBN: 978-1-4426-8456-0. Subjects: Art & Art History. Privately, however, harrowing family losses were to mark the new decade.

Langdon, Gabrielle Medici women: portraits of power, love and betrayal from the court of Duke Cosimo I, Gabrielle Langdon. 1. Women Italy Florence Portraits. 2. Medici, House of Portraits. 3. Cosimo I, Grand-Duke of Tuscany, 15191574 Art patronage. 4. Medici, House of Art patronage. 5. Portraits, Italian 16th century.

Portraiture especially served the dynastic pretensions of the absolutist ruler, Duke Cosimo and his consort, Eleonora di Toledo, and was part of a Herculean programme of propaganda to establish legitimacy and prestige for the new sixteenth-century Florentine court. In this engaging and original study, Gabrielle Langdon analyses selected portraits of women by Jacopo Pontormo, Agnolo Bronzino, Alessandro Allori, and other masters.

The ducal court of Cosimo I de' Medici in sixteenth-century Florence was one of absolutist, rule-bound order. Portraiture especially served the dynastic pretensions of the absolutist ruler, Duke Cosimo and his consort, Eleonora di Toledo, and was part of a Herculean programme of propaganda to establish legitimacy and prestige for the new sixteenth-century Florentine court.

In this engaging and original study, Gabrielle Langdon analyses selected portraits of women by Jacopo Pontormo, Agnolo Bronzino, Alessandro Allori, and other masters. She defines their function as works of art, as dynastic declarations, and as encoded documents of court culture and propaganda, illuminating Cosimo's conscious fashioning of his court portraiture in imitation of the great courts of Europe. Langdon explores the use of portraiture as a vehicle to express Medici political policy, such as with Cosimo's Hapsburg and Papal alliances in his bid to be made Grand Duke with hegemony over rival Italian princes.

Stories from archives, letters, diaries, chronicles, and secret ambassadorial briefs, open up a world of fascinating, personalities, personal triumphs, human frailty, rumour, intrigue, and appalling tragedies. Lavishly illustrated, Medici Women: Portraits of Power, Love and Betrayal in the Court of Duke Cosimo I is an indispensable work for anyone with a passion for Italian renaissance history, art, and court culture.

User reviews
Cerar
This magnificent book displays the best of the art history AND history being written today. Gabrielle Langdon's years of research and writing have paid off in a study that offers new evidence about one of the most significant periods of Florentine history (the sixteenth century) and about one of its most fabled dynasties, the Medici. She furnishes well-researched accounts of the major artists working in Florence at the time, and she demonstrates a breath-taking command of the ample theoretical material on topics such as iconography, artistic restoration, gender studies, and issues of race in history.
Langdon has been instrumental in uncovering the importance of Alessandro de' Medici and his progeny for Florentine history, as his brief reign as Duke of Florence has not been scrutinized sufficiently by modern historians. Alessandro's African (or "moorish") ancestry is a crucial aspect of Langdon's study, and it is refreshing to see this topic dealt with in a sensitive manner. Together with some forthcoming research by Professor John Brackett on Alessandro, we will soon have a better picture of a complex, violent, and crucial phase of European history.
A final comment: Langdon is a scrupulous researcher, whose copious notes demonstrate her command of the literature of this period, but she is also a gracious scholar, who pays tribute to the work of others and presents differences of opinion in an even-handed and non-acrimonious manner.
This is one of the best books I have read in the last ten years.
SkroN
Even if you have read other books on Renaissance painting you are bound to lean a lot by reading this one. This is a very academic overview of the paintings of Medici women in Florence during the reign of Cosimo 1st. The centrepiece portraits are those done by Bronzino with the portrait of Duchess Eleonora and her son Giovanni given a whole chapter to itself.

The author brings an impressive depth of scholarship to this book - and outlines the social and intellectual expectations that are encoded within these somewhat seemingly simple portraits. There are layers of meaning in these paintings - even the most simple looking - that would have been read by contemporary viewers but have been lost to modern viewers as society has changed.

Half this book is references and the author has extensively footnoted her sources. These a selection of colour images at the front of the book of the central portraits discussed and sections of black and white images of other portraits that are used on a comparison basis. This is not a picture book as such, but you'll learn a lot by reading it and the paintings in the colour section will quite literally come alive for you after you have read their subjects backgrounds and meanings painted within them. This book is highly recommended if you want an in-depth understanding of Florentine women's portraits in the 16th century, but it will be a disappointment if you are looking for a large selection of colour images of Medici women.