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Free eBook Untying the Knot: Making Peace in the Taiwan Strait download

by Richard C. Bush

Free eBook Untying the Knot: Making Peace in the Taiwan Strait download ISBN: 081571288X
Author: Richard C. Bush
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press (July 7, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 416
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1771 mb
Size FLAC: 1315 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: doc azw docx lrf


Includes bibliographical references and index.

Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Introduction - 2. Getting to the present - 3. Economic cooperation, political deadlock - 4. The sovereignty issue - 5. The security issue - 6. Domestic politics and cross-straight relations - 7. Decisionmaking systems - 8. The leverage game - 9. The . factor - 10. Muting pressures, reconciling differences - 11. If a settlement is not possible? -. - 12. Choices ahead

Richard Bush's book on the Taiwan-China conundrum benefits from his vast experience in the field and rigorous intellectual analysis.

Richard Bush's book on the Taiwan-China conundrum benefits from his vast experience in the field and rigorous intellectual analysis.

Richard C. Bush III (born November 21, 1947) is an American expert on China affairs. Bush, Richard C. (2005). Untying the Knot: Making Peace in the Taiwan Strait. The Brookings Institution. He is the director of Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies (CNAPS) of the Brookings Institution (since 2002) and a Senior Fellow of Foreign Policy. ISBN 978-0-8157-1288-6. Retrieved 23 December 2014. Bush, Richard . O'Hanlon, Michael (2007). A War Like No Other: The Truth About China's Challenge to America. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0-471-98677-5. (2010).

Untying the Knot book. Richard C. Bush, whose career has been dedicated to Taiwan-China issues, explores the conflicts between these nations and the difficulties that must be resolved. The relationship between Taiwan and China is a paradox. Disagreements over sovereignty and security form the core of the dispute. What would be the legal status and international role of the Taiwan government in a future unified China? Given China's growing military power, how could Taiwan feel secure?

In his book Untying the Knot: Making Peace in the Taiwan Strait, Bush documents in authoritative fashion the many complex historical, political, Derek Mitchell is Senior Fellow for Asia, International Security Program, CSIS.

In his book Untying the Knot: Making Peace in the Taiwan Strait, Bush documents in authoritative fashion the many complex historical, political, Derek Mitchell is Senior Fellow for Asia, International Security Program, CSIS. From 1997 to. 2001 he was Special Assistant for Asian and Pacific Affairs, Office of the Secretary of Defense, during which time he also served as Senior Country Director for China, Taiwan, Mongolia, and Hong Kong (2000–01). He can be reached a. .sociological, and even psychological elements of the current impasse.

book by Richard C. Bush. With no suicide bomber or mass murders of Taiwan investors, the two sides are still at odds with the political deadlock.

Book Description: The relationship between Taiwan and China is a paradox. What would be the legal status and international role of the Taiwan government in a future unified China? Given China's growing military power, how could Taiwan feel secure? Complicating these issues are domestic politics and international competition, as well as misperceptions on both sides.

Making Peace in the Taiwan Strait. By RICHARD C. BUSH Untying the Knot. Making Peace in the Taiwan Strait. - Volume 186 - GÜNTER SCHUCHER.

In its pursuit of peace in the Taiwan Strait, the United States could get drawn into a war between the two rivals.

The relationship between Taiwan and China is a paradox. On the one hand, the two economies are becoming increasingly integrated, as Taiwanese companies have come to regard the mainland as the best place to manufacture their products and maintain global competitiveness. On the other hand, the long-running and changing political dispute between the two governments remains unresolved. Each side fears the intentions of the other and is acquiring military capabilities to deter disaster. In its pursuit of peace in the Taiwan Strait, the United States could get drawn into a war between the two rivals. Richard C. Bush, whose career has been dedicated to Taiwan-China issues, explores the conflicts between these nations and the difficulties that must be resolved. Disagreements over sovereignty and security form the core of the dispute. What would be the legal status and international role of the Taiwan government in a future unified China? Given China's growing military power, how could Taiwan feel secure? Complicating these issues are domestic politics and international competition, as well as misperceptions on both sides. Thus multiple obstacles prevent the two sides from even getting to the negotiating table, much less reaching a mutually acceptable resolution. For reasons of policy and politics, the United States is constrained from a central role. To begin with, it must provide China with some reassurance about its policy in order to secure cooperation on foreign policy issues. At the same time, it must bolster Taiwan's political confidence and military deterrence while discouraging provocative actions. The arcane nature of this dispute severely restricts the role of the United States as conflict mediator. But if there is to be any solution to this conflict, the comprehensive analysis that this book provides will be required reading for effective policy.

User reviews
IWAS
The author did a good job explaining the history of the 56-year conflict of the two sides. From 1991 to 2004, Taiwan invested a total of $78 billion USDollars in China and cross-strait trade was about the same amount. With no suicide bomber or mass murders of Taiwan investors, the two sides are still at odds with the political deadlock. Issues on sovereignty, security, independence vs unification, the leverage game, US factor.. were covered in depth. People in Taiwan followed the Japanese and US business model, the economy boomed for 40 years. Now that the middle class in China is doing the same thing, that is about 100 million out of 1.3 billion people. Again, the two sides are very different. Untying the knot will be at least 20+ years when the majority of 1.3 billion are catching up as middle class in China.
Fordg
If you're into studying China/Taiwan then this book is a good read in understanding one of the worlds potential political hot-spots which is the Taiwan Strait.
inetserfer
I would strongly recommend this excellent book for anyone who seriously wants to read about one of the most complex geopolitical issues affecting security in Asia and Sino-US relations.

Mr. Bush served as head of the American Institute in Taiwan ("AIT"), the organization established by Congress in the 1970s to handle relations between the US and the ROC authorities controlling Taiwan after the US switched formal diplomatic recognition to the PRC. As a part of his duties, Mr. Bush repeatedly met with the highest members of the political establishment in Taiwan as well as with the most senior US policy makers under the Clinton and Bush (II) administrations. Mr. Bush's book provides the reader with a very readable, detailed and accurate description of the historic background and current political dilemmas raised by the current division of authority on each side of the Taiwan Strait. He dispassionately and accurately summarizes the various geographical, historic, political, economic, legal, cultural, linguistic and social factors impacting and shaping the acrimonious relations between the authorities in the Beijing and Taipei. His description of those complex issues and their interactions within the context of cross strait relations is one of the most objective and clear-sighted descriptions I've yet read. Mr. Bush also deftly analyses the role of the US government within the context of cross strait relations and on Sino-US relations in general. In particular, Bush relies on solid facts as evidenced by the excellent citations to varied sources, including open source press materials, observations of leading political figures with whom he has personally met, various treatises and policy papers by Chinese, Taiwanese and US analysts. Moreover, and despite another reviewer's rather silly comments to the contrary, Bush's grasp of the public international law issues is quite good and based on his professional experience and extensive interaction with public international legal specialists, both inside and outside of the United States government. Bush's description of these legal issues further illustrates the complexities dogging the resolution of this complex issue. While I may not entirely agree with all of his conclusions on the role the US can play in bringing about a resolution to the issue of reunification, I found this work to be a worthy addition to the limited corpus of works on this critical issue.

I should add that I was an official with the AIT from 1998-2000 though I never met Mr. Bush in person. Before that I spent several years in Asia working for the US government, both as military officer and later as diplomat. I've traveled extensively in China, and have many Chinese and Taiwanese friends, in and out of their respective governments, with whom I've discussed the issues related to cross strait relations. In short, I've been intimately involved with cross strait relations and Sino-US relations for some time and strongly believe that Bush's book is worth the five stars I gave above.
Malara
"Untying the Knot" enjoyed a brief popularity in Taiwan, however the book does not pose any new solutions for the problems in the Taiwan Strait. These problems have been with us for over fifty years.

I will be quite direct and say that Mr. Bush has a very very limited understanding of international law issues, and his limited understanding is especially noticeable when he tries to discuss the "Taiwan sovereignty" issue.

Contrasingly, reading through the sixteen pages of documentation in a new lawsuit filed in late Oct. 2006 in Washington D.C. shows a much more complete picture, and offers some truly "creative thinking" on all related issues. This new lawsuit advances a little-known but surprisingly coherent rationale under international law to say that Taiwan is "an overseas territory under the jurisdiction of the USA." A summary of the lawsuit is here -- [...]

Perhaps Mr. Bush would be interested in studying these court documents, and other related background information on the internet, and then writing up an Addendum for his book !! My friends and I will look forward to seeing a revised version of "Untying the Knot" in the not too distant future.