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by Noam Chomsky

Free eBook For Reasons of State download ISBN: 1565847946
Author: Noam Chomsky
Publisher: New Press, The; Revised edition (May 15, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 440
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1871 mb
Size FLAC: 1992 mb
Rating: 4.4
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Nevertheless, at a particular time there is every reason to develop, insofar as our understanding permits, a specific realization of this definite trend in the historic development of mankind, appropriate to the tasks of the moment.

Nevertheless, at a particular time there is every reason to develop, insofar as our understanding permits, a specific realization of this definite trend in the historic development of mankind, appropriate to the tasks of the moment. For Rocker, the problem that is set for our time is that of freeing man from the curse of economic exploitation and political and social enslavement ; and the method is not the conquest and exercise of state power, nor stultifying parliamentarianism, but rather to reconstruct the economic life of the peoples from the ground up and build it up in the spirit of.

For Reasons of State book. Back in print after thirty years, this is a classic collection of Chomsky essays. It is particularly valuable as the first of Chomsky's works to fully demonstrate his power as a political thinker. Back in print after thirty years, this is a classic collection. In his biting critiques of American foreign policy, the collection showcases his unique ability to join broader philosophical concerns with the political realities of his time.

1973) For Reasons of State. ISBN 978-0-00-211242-0.

Transformational Analysis (P. University of Pennsylvania. 1973) For Reasons of State.

The pieces here cover a wide range of topics, beginning with a powerful denunciation of the US war of aggression and atrocity in Vietnam during its final years.

Noam Avram Chomsky was born December 7, 1928, in Philadelphia. During the 1940s, he began developing socialist political leanings through his encounters with the New York Jewish intellectual community. Chomsky received his P. from the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied linguistics, mathematics, and philosophy.

Noam Chomsky is widely known and deeply admired for being the founder of modern linguistics, one of the founders of the field of cognitive science, and perhaps the . For Reasons of State, New York: Pantheon Books, 1973. Peace in the Middle East?

For Reasons of State, New York: Pantheon Books, 1973. Peace in the Middle East?

In 1973, Noam Chomsky released this collection of expanded articles and new material. This was his second political book, published at the height of Vietnam war protests. The book begins with an in-depth examination of the Pentagon Papers.

In 1973, Noam Chomsky released this collection of expanded articles and new material. This confidential history of US policy toward Vietnam was made public in the late 1960s, leading to a lawsuit by the US government against the New York Times and other newspapers.

The book’s highly technical marshaling of data speaks primarily to economists and secondarily to liberal policymakers. Today we offer a collection of Chomsky’s political books and interviews free to read online, courtesy of Znet. Piketty's calls for redistribution have lead to charges of Marxism from the other end of the political spectrum-due to some inevitable degree to the book's provocative title. While these texts come from the 1990s, it’s surprising how fresh and relevant they still sound today.

Xxxiv, 440 p. ; 22 cm. The backroom boys. The wider wa. The rule of force in international affairs. Indochina: the next phase. On the limits of civil disobedience. The function of the university in a time of crisis. Psychology and ideology.

Professor Noam Chomsky is widely regarded as our greatest living political thinker. Academic and activist, Chomsky is a true polymath. After single-handedly changing the course of modern linguistics, he went on to shape the way we think about the modern world through the rigorous socio-political criticism and analytic philosophy for which he is universally known today. Noam Chomsky is a writer who speaks truth to power. Wherever he turns his attention, his work is marked out by his clarity of vision and his impassioned commitment to truth and justice.

Analyzes the events surrounding the Vietnam War with articles and essays that include depictions of the domestic and international affairs, an illumination of the Pentagon Papers, and an introduction to anarchism.
User reviews
Throw her heart
In 1973, Noam Chomsky released this collection of expanded articles and new material. This was his second political book, published at the height of Vietnam war protests. The book begins with an in-depth examination of the Pentagon Papers. This confidential history of US policy toward Vietnam was made public in the late 1960s, leading to a lawsuit by the US government against the New York Times and other newspapers. The newspapers won (when midwestern papers started printing the confidential history, making the lawsuit irrelevant) and everyone was finally able to see what the Pentagon had been up to since the 1950s.
It's not a pretty picture. Chomsky quotes the Papers relentlessly, citing multiple versions of it. He lets the generals and politicians speak for themselves, revealing their real commitments, showing how they prevented democracy from breaking out in Vietnam in 1954. From there, he shows how the war expanded to Laos and Cambodia. The footnotes for these chapters are massive, citing hundreds of reliable sources. This section of the book is one of the best examinations of the Vietnam war you'll ever read, right up there with Gabriel Kolko's "Anatomy of a War" and Marilyn Young's "The Vietnam Wars."
Then Chomsky shifts gears. He writes a brief but powerful essay on war resistance and the role of universities as subversive institutions. These chapters show Chomsky's commitment to peaceful, intelligent, democratic protest --- and his honesty about its limitations.
The final chapters are about behaviorism, anarchism, and human nature. Although these topics are quite a change from the Vietnam war material at the beginning, they are no less impressive. Chomsky's review of BF Skinner's behaviorism completely demolishes the concept. This essay single-handedly brought the field to a halt in 1972. (Skinner responded once, failing to counter Chomsky's arguments, and behaviorism never recovered.) He even takes time to explain, in a single footnote, why Richard Herrnstein's study of IQ is useless (which made "The Bell Curve" irrelevant twenty years before it was written). Chomsky's notes on anarchism and his reflections on the mystery of human nature describe his underlying attitude about people and their relation to the state.
I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants an education on Vietnam or Noam Chomsky's political work. The lies of Vietnam --- and the illegitimate authority of the state --- continue today in new forms. This book will inspire you to activism, and to learn more.
Fordrelis
Those wishing to understand the hijinks that led to the US invasion of Iraq can do no better in reviewing this seminal "nostalgia" piece on American war planning. Overcoming the "Vietnam syndrome" led right back to the quagmire, proof that those in power do not learn from history because they choose to ignore it.

The inaccurate ramblings of one reviewer - holding Chomsky somehow accountable for the Khmer Rouge coming to power after this collection of essays was published - demonstrate how atrocity reportage from postwar Indochina was consciously exploited to retroactively justify the war. Reading this review of the Pentagon Papers - over half the book - demonstrate that whatever befell the region later was established in Washington by men who cared not one bit for the nations and people they condemned to disaster.
Kipabi
Really a total mis-mash of bewildering essays from the mid 70s this collection mirrors the typical anti-Americanism of the era. The essays are called `bold' but the reality is that disagreeing with the Vietnam war isn't exactly revolutionary. No original thought is found within these essays instead they are the typical `America is evil' mentality. One essay in particular focuses on the war in Laos and Cambodia but it ignores the Vietnamese invasions of these countries and the destabilizing influence that Vietnamese troops caused as they rampaged through the rice fields of Cambodia in order to invade South Vietnam. The reality is that these essays completely ignore and in fact deny the truth about Pol Pots regime in Cambodia, a communist regime that killed 25% of the country and especially murdered minority groups and Muslims. These glaring anti-factuals make this collection hard to accept and even harder to digest. Fans of the authors previous work will be delighted, while most will be unhappy.