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by Deborah Eade,John Sayer

Free eBook Development and the Private Sector: Consuming Interests (Development in Practice) download ISBN: 1565492188
Author: Deborah Eade,John Sayer
Publisher: Kumarian Press (August 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 296
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics and Government
Size MP3: 1957 mb
Size FLAC: 1604 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lrf rtf lrf doc


Examining the impact of the private sector on development, whether through core business practices, corporate responsibility endeavours, or philanthropic activities, this book focuses on how the private sector can do less harm, and even do considerable good by fostering equitable development.

Examining the impact of the private sector on development, whether through core business practices, corporate responsibility endeavours, or philanthropic activities, this book focuses on how the private sector can do less harm, and even do considerable good by fostering equitable development.

Private Sector Development (PSD) is a term in the international development industry to refer to a range of strategies for promoting economic growth and reducing poverty in developing countries by building private enterprises

Private Sector Development (PSD) is a term in the international development industry to refer to a range of strategies for promoting economic growth and reducing poverty in developing countries by building private enterprises. This could be through working with firms directly, with membership organisations to represent them, or through a range of areas of policy and regulation to promote functioning, competitive markets.

A Kumarian Press Book.

ISBN: 978-1-56549-218-9. A Kumarian Press Book. Presenting both analytical chapters and case studies ranging from El Salvador, to Kenya, to Timor-Leste, the authors of Development and the Private Sector explore how the private sector can do less harm, and even do considerable good, by fostering equitable development. John Sayer is head of Africa Now, an NGO that supports small producers in Africa and promotes pro-poor ethical trade.

Development and the Private Sector: Consuming Interests (2006), Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian Press. Development NGOs and Labor Unions: Terms of Engagement (2005), Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian Press. A true collaborator, she has a real sense of the broader publishing climate, and knowledge of the legal, ethical, sales and rights environments. Richard Delahunty, Publisher, Routledge.

Develop Private Sector PB book. Development and the Private Sector: Consuming Interests (Development in Practice). 1565492188 (ISBN13: 9781565492189).

abstract This article focuses on the role that development NGOs play in capacity building, arguing that many conventional NGO practices are ultimately about retaining power, rather than empowering their partners.

abstract This article focuses on the role that development NGOs play in capacity building, arguing that many conventional NGO practices are ultimately about retaining power, rather than empowering their partners

The private sector has long been recognized as a key determinant of development, whether by. .

The private sector has long been recognized as a key determinant of development, whether by facilitating of by undermining it, Eade, 2006. This introductory chapter explores the nature of the private sector and its role in relation to economical growth and the distribution of benefits.

Eade Deborah and John Sayer (eds), Development and the Private Sector: Consuming Interests (Bloomfield .

Eade Deborah and John Sayer (eds), Development and the Private Sector: Consuming Interests (Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian Press, In. 2006). Elkington, John, Cannibals with Forks: The Triple Bottom Line of 21st Century Business (Oxford: Capstone Publishing, 1997). Evans, Peter, ‘The challenges of the institutional turn : Interdisciplinary opportunities in development theory’. UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Economic Development in Africa: Rethinking the Role of Foreign Direct Investment (Geneva: United Nations, 2005).

Its effective application therefore requires ongoing dialogue with and the strong engagement of men and women from poor marginal farming communities.

* Comprehensive examination of roles private sector plays in development* Collection part of the Kumarian Press and Oxfam Development in Practice readers series Corporations have a major impact on the lives of people in developing countries. Not only do they determine the shape of the international economy but many private companies now provide essential social services that were previously the responsibility of government. The growth of corporate power has generated a backlash as companies are held to account for the social and environmental impacts of their business. The resulting array of new initiatives coming under the term ‘corporate social responsibility’ has many implications for development. There are heated debates as to whether these initiatives should remain voluntary, or form part of tighter international regulation of business. Corporations clearly have the potential to contribute to sustainable economic growth in developing countries. However, their business can also undermine people’s livelihoods. Contributors to this volume examine the impact of the private sector on development, whether through core business practices, corporate responsibility endeavors, or philanthropic activities. Bringing together both analytical chapters and case studies ranging from El Salvador, to Kenya, to Timor-Leste, this book focuses on how the private sector can do less harm, and even do considerable good by fostering equitable development. Other contributors: Stephanie Ware Barrientos, Jem Bendell, Catherine Dolan, Sumi Dhanarajan, Deborah Doane, Niamh Garvey, David Hall, April Linton, Lienda Loebis, Emanuele Lobina, Robin de la Motte, Ben Moxham, Julian Oram, Peter Newell, Carolina Quinteros, Leopoldo Rodriguez-Boetsch, Hubert Schmitz, Sally Smith, Anne Tallontire, and Peter Utting.