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by Erich Fromm

Free eBook The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology download ISBN: 159056183X
Author: Erich Fromm
Publisher: Lantern Books; Revised ed. edition (October 1, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 160
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Philosophy
Size MP3: 1414 mb
Size FLAC: 1569 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: txt azw lit lrf


Erich Fromm (1900-1980) was a German social psychologist, psychoanalyst, humanistic philosopher, and democratic socialist. He was associated with what became known as the Frankfurt School of critical theory

Erich Fromm (1900-1980) was a German social psychologist, psychoanalyst, humanistic philosopher, and democratic socialist. He was associated with what became known as the Frankfurt School of critical theory. His best known work, Escape from Freedom (1941), focuses on the human urge to seek a source of authority and control upon reaching a freedom that was thought to be an individual’s true desire. His many works (in English) include Psychoanalysis and Religion (1950); The Art.

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The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology

The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology. First published in 1968, the year of t confrontation and revolution, this classic challenges readers to choose which of two roads humankind ought to take: the one, leading to a completely mechanized society with the individual a helpless cog in a machine bent on mass destruction; or the second, being the path of humanism and hope.

In his discussion of hope in his The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology (1968) Fromm moves fluidly from the personal or individual to the social - a consciously hopeful person, benefiting individually from an orientation toward greater aliveness can join others i. .

In his discussion of hope in his The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology (1968) Fromm moves fluidly from the personal or individual to the social - a consciously hopeful person, benefiting individually from an orientation toward greater aliveness can join others in hopeful social activity. Just as Aristotle saw his virtues as golden means between opposing poles - for instance, the virtue of bravery as a mean between cowardice and foolhardiness - so Fromm sees hope: Hope is paradoxical.

Erich Fromm was born on March 23, 1900, at Frankfurt am Main, the only child of Orthodox Jewish parents, Rosa (Krause) and Naphtali Fromm. The Revolution of Hope, toward a humanized technology (1968). ISBN 978-1-59056-183-6. The Nature of Man (1968). He started his academic studies in 1918 at the University of Frankfurt am Main with two semesters of jurisprudence. During the summer semester of 1919, Fromm studied at the University of Heidelberg, where he began studying sociology under Alfred Weber (brother of the better known sociologist Max Weber), pher Karl Jaspers, and Heinrich Rickert.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Excavaciones en el agora de Gerasa en 1983.

5 The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology (1968). Human Nature and Social Theory (1969)

5 The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology (1968). Human Nature and Social Theory (1969). The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness (1973). 2 Quotes about Erich Fromm. Even good deeds by the enemy are considered a sign of particular devilishness, meant to deceive us and the world, while our bad deeds are necessary and justified by our noble goals which they serve. Erich Fromm, The Art of Loving (1956), p. 100–101. One cannot be deeply responsive to the world without being saddened very often. ABC TV (25 May 1958).

Bibliographic Citation. New York: Harper & Row, c1968, 1970.

Harper & Row, 1974 - 177 sayfa. The revolution of hope: toward a humanized technology 325. sayfa/Perennial Library. Harper & Row, 1974.

"The Revolution of Hope lives up to its title with an uplifting exploration of the definition of hope, what it truly means to be human, and steps that should be taken to promote humanization in an increasingly disconnected and technology-driven society. [The American Mental Health Foundation's Fromm titles] are timely, directly relevant to modern psychological and social issues, and bring absolutely invaluable humanist messages to temper psychology's scientific and healing discipline. Highly recommended, especially for college library collections."

Midwest Book Review

First published in 1968, the year of international-student confrontation and revolution, this classic challenges readers to choose which of two roads humankind ought to take: the one, leading to a completely mechanized society with the individual a helpless cog in a machine bent on mass destruction; or the second, being the path of humanism and hope.
User reviews
Mr_Mole
as described
Nanecele
Amazing book !
Broadraven
Erich Seligmann Fromm (1900-1980) was a German social psychologist, psychoanalyst, sociologist, humanistic philosopher, and democratic socialist; in Europe, he was associated with the Frankfurt School. He wrote many other books such as Escape from Freedom,Psychoanalysis and Religion,The Art of Loving,Beyond the Chains of Illusion,Dogma of Christ & Other Essays on Religi,You Shall Be as Gods,Greatness and Limitations of Freud's Thought, etc.

He wrote in the Foreword to this 1968 book, "This book is written as a response to America's situation in the year 1968. It is born out of the conviction that we are at the crossroads: one road leads to a completely mechanized society ... the other to a renaissance of humanism and hope---to a society that puts technique in the service of man's well-being. This book is meant to clarify the issues for those who have not clearly recognized our dilemma, and it is an appeal to action." (Pg. vii)

He suggests, "To hope is a state of being. It is an inner readiness, that of intense but not-yet-spent activeness... Hope is a psychic concomitant to life and growth... When hope has gone life has ended, actually or potentially. Hope is an intrinsic element of the structure of life, or the dynamic of man's spirit. It is closely linked with another element of the structure of life: faith... faith is the conviction about the not yet proven, the knowledge of the real possibility... Faith is rational when it refers to the knowledge of the real yet unborn... Faith, like hope, is not prediction of the FUTURE; it is the vision of the PRESENT in a state of pregnancy." (Pg. 12-14)

He states, "one may arrive at objective norms if one starts with one premise: that it is desirable that a living system should grow and produce the maximum of vitality and intrinsic harmony, that it, subjectively, of well-being... The validity of the norms would follow from their function in promoting the optimum of growth and well-being and the minumum of ill-being." (Pg. 96)

He argues for an essentially socialist system: "In such a shift from the private to the public sector of consumption, private spending would be restrained as more income was diverted to higher taxes, and there would be a measurable shift from deadening, dehumanizing private consumption to new forms of public consumption that would involve people in creative community activities. Needless to say, such a shift would require careful planning to avoid severe upsets in the economic system..." (Pg. 139)

He concludes, "The socialization of the means of production could only be achieved as the result of a socialist revolution, and if such a revolution has no chance to succeed, then the humanization of technology obviously would have no chance either... The sacredness of private property is paradoxical and absurd in view of the fact that very few people own property in the means of production... the majority of people would violently oppose socialization of the means of production, although they have no share in them. This means that legal expropriation ... meets with such violent resistance that it is impossible to achieve, short of a revolution." (Pg. 162-163)

This book (written at the height of the student protests, Vietnam conflict, etc.) seems much more "dated" than nearly all of Fromm's other works. Still, his vision may still have some attraction to those with a "collective" focus.
Malodora
Erich Seligmann Fromm (1900-1980) was a German social psychologist, psychoanalyst, sociologist, humanistic philosopher, and democratic socialist; in Europe, he was associated with the Frankfurt School. He wrote many other books such as Escape from Freedom,Psychoanalysis and Religion,The Art of Loving,Beyond the Chains of Illusion,Dogma of Christ & Other Essays on Religi,You Shall Be as Gods,Greatness and Limitations of Freud's Thought, etc.

He wrote in the Foreword to this 1968 book, "This book is written as a response to America's situation in the year 1968. It is born out of the conviction that we are at the crossroads: one road leads to a completely mechanized society ... the other to a renaissance of humanism and hope---to a society that puts technique in the service of man's well-being. This book is meant to clarify the issues for those who have not clearly recognized our dilemma, and it is an appeal to action." (Pg. vii)

He suggests, "To hope is a state of being. It is an inner readiness, that of intense but not-yet-spent activeness... Hope is a psychic concomitant to life and growth... When hope has gone life has ended, actually or potentially. Hope is an intrinsic element of the structure of life, or the dynamic of man's spirit. It is closely linked with another element of the structure of life: faith... faith is the conviction about the not yet proven, the knowledge of the real possibility... Faith is rational when it refers to the knowledge of the real yet unborn... Faith, like hope, is not prediction of the FUTURE; it is the vision of the PRESENT in a state of pregnancy." (Pg. 12-14)

He states, "one may arrive at objective norms if one starts with one premise: that it is desirable that a living system should grow and produce the maximum of vitality and intrinsic harmony, that it, subjectively, of well-being... The validity of the norms would follow from their function in promoting the optimum of growth and well-being and the minumum of ill-being." (Pg. 96)

He argues for an essentially socialist system: "In such a shift from the private to the public sector of consumption, private spending would be restrained as more income was diverted to higher taxes, and there would be a measurable shift from deadening, dehumanizing private consumption to new forms of public consumption that would involve people in creative community activities. Needless to say, such a shift would require careful planning to avoid severe upsets in the economic system..." (Pg. 139)

He concludes, "The socialization of the means of production could only be achieved as the result of a socialist revolution, and if such a revolution has no chance to succeed, then the humanization of technology obviously would have no chance either... The sacredness of private property is paradoxical and absurd in view of the fact that very few people own property in the means of production... the majority of people would violently oppose socialization of the means of production, although they have no share in them. This means that legal expropriation ... meets with such violent resistance that it is impossible to achieve, short of a revolution." (Pg. 162-163)

This book (written at the height of the student protests, Vietnam conflict, etc.) seems much more "dated" than nearly all of Fromm's other works. Still, his vision may still have some attraction to those with a "collective" focus.