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Free eBook Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and Its Challenge to Western Thought download

by Mark Johnson,George Lakoff

Free eBook Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and Its Challenge to Western Thought download ISBN: 0965888045
Author: Mark Johnson,George Lakoff
Publisher: Basic Books; Trade Paperback Edition edition (1999)
Language: English
Pages: 624
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Philosophy
Size MP3: 1734 mb
Size FLAC: 1960 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: mbr doc docx lrf


George Lakoff and Mark Johnson begin with three sentences that summarize and. characterize their book . Our mental system is built primarily to control action, and so mind is formed by the nature of the body and its interactions with the world.

George Lakoff and Mark Johnson begin with three sentences that summarize and. characterize their book: The mind is inherently embodied. Thought is mostly unconscious. In this paper we will explore the nature of virtue and its formation from the perspective of embodied cognition. We specifically describe exemplars of the virtue of compassion (caregivers of individuals with developmental disabilities in L'Arche communities), speculating as to what might have been the formative influences in their character development.

George Lakoff and Mark Johnson take on the daunting task of rebuilding Western philosophy in alignment .

George Lakoff and Mark Johnson take on the daunting task of rebuilding Western philosophy in alignment with three fundamental lessons from cognitive science: the mind is inherently embodied; thought is mostly unconscious; and abstract concepts are largely metaphorical. Thought requires a bodynot in the trivial sense that you need a physical brain to think with, but in the profound sense that the very structure of our thoughts comes from the nature of the body. Nearly all of our unconscious metaphors are based on common bodily experiences.

Lakoff, George; Johnson, Mark, 1949 .

Lakoff, George; Johnson, Mark, 1949-. The cognitive unconscious - The embodied mind - Primary metaphor and subjective experience - The anatomy of complex metaphor - Embodied realism : cognitive science versus a priori philosophy - Realism and truth - Metaphor and truth - The cognitive science of philosophical ideas - Time - Events and causes - The mind

Philosophy in the Flesh book.

Philosophy in the Flesh book. Start by marking Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought.

Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and Its Challenge to Western Thought.

Bringing together the perspectives of linguistics and philosophy, Lakoff and Johnson offer an intriguing and surprising guide to some of the most common metaphors and what they can tell us about the human mind. George Lakoff and Mark Turner explain how poems rely upon and extend the basic cognitive metaphors by which we make sense of the world.

Philosophy in the flesh : the embodied mind and its challenge to Western thought. New York, . : Basic Books. Lakoff and Johnson show that a philosophy responsible to the science of mind offers radically new and detailed understandings of what a person is. After first describing the philosophical stance that must follow from taking cognitive science seriously, they re-examine the basic concepts of the mind, time, causation, morality, and the self: then they rethink a host of philosophical traditions, from the classical Greeks through Kantian morality through modern analytic philosophy.

George Lakoff and Mark Johnson take on the daunting task of rebuilding Western philosophy in alignment with three fundamental lessons from cognitive science: Th. .A good, instructive read! By Thriftbooks. com User, November 14, 2005. Unlike some of the other critics here, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and, as for those who feel there is a political axe to grind, I did not read that in this book. Perhaps they are thinking of themselves. Here, Lakoff and Johnson look at the role played by metaphor in constructing meaning. They show (adequately, I thought) that our metaphors rely on the manner in which we are embodied.

Lakoff, George and Johnson, Mark. It begins by announcing three major "findings" of cognitive science: "The mind is inherently embodied. New York: Basic Books, 1999.

Similar books and articles. The Philosophy in the Flesh: George Lakoff y Mark Johnson. Women, Fire and Dangerous Things: What Categories Reveal About the Mind George Lakoff Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1987. Philosophy In The Flesh: The Embodied Mind and Its Challenge to Western Thought, by G. Lakoff and M. Johnson.

Massive 624 page book on "The Embodied Mind and Its Challenge to Western Thought."
User reviews
Eayaroler
This heavy book's theme is essentially this: Based on what we have learned about ourselves over the several centuries from the advances in science, we can now state decisively that most of our philosophical speculations of the last 2000+ years are wrong and need to be opened up, updated, and rewritten. The pace of expansion of our modern knowledge base has left our scholarly and popular consciousness far behind, and we need a fairly radical reorientation of our world view to incorporate new findings into what Lakoff and Johnson dub "empirically responsible philosophy." Anything less than a complete rewrite will leave a detritus of old and long disproven thought to clog the path ahead. Of course, a revolutionary revision like as they suggest would be bound to create massive dislocations of its own, with results that would be inestimable in any terms. The title of the book, Philosophy in the Flesh, places Exhibit A in the trial of our legacy worldview right on the cover. Our traditional philosophy removes the mind from the body, while all current research shows it to be firmly ensconced in the brain. We are in the position of Galileo in the 17th century, who was accused of murdering the angels who had to push the planets around in their orbits to accommodate Aristotelian physical concepts. The Scientific Revolution changed everything, but much of our modern mind still clings to older views now known to be false, including a good deal of the model the Scientific Revolution posed as an alternative to even older ideas. This is a good book for anyone interested in gauging the disconnect between ancient, ancient-modern, and modern views of nature, mind, and self. Whether you agree or disagree with their claims, these authors have posed a challenge that must be met with something other than the denialism so prominent in many areas of science, history, and philosophy.
Kinashand
I read the editors reviews above and the top customer reviews for this text. I don't feel I need to cover the same ground and I'm not going to. However, I have some personal thoughts that may be useful to add.

In my opinion, Philosophy in the Flesh is a monumental undertaking because it is an attempt to topple an existing paradigm marked by many unexamined assumptions about the nature of the mind, consciousness and the mind-body relationship. This is a very tall order and while the book has some shortcomings, it successfully makes a dent in this direction.

I agree with one reviewer's comments about not including and integrating work from researchers on the relationship between consciousness, the body and emotions such as Damasio. To get this background on your own, I would consider reading "The Feeling of What Happens" and other research in the field. I also agree with this same reviewer's comment about neglecting an evolutionary perspective and to get this I would start by reading David Buss. Understanding our cognitive biases is important and many of these do come from evolutionary psychology. For dramatic examples of these, you might try reading THE EVOLUTION OF DESIRE on sexual mating strategies or JEALOUSY by David Buss. There are also other many good books in this general genre and David Buss has written more than a few of them.

With respect to PHILOSOPHY IN THE FLESH itself, I found the first 136 pages most useful. This justifies the cost of the book because it lays out the author's basic theories, the disconnects between what we know about the mind and what is assumed to be true because of an enduring, but outdated concept of the mind-body relationship. In other words, the first 136 pages are like a nitty-gritty short book on the "must know" concepts.

The remainder of the book goes more deeply into specific examples of how the mind is embodied, the role of unconscious condition as the "hidden hand" that influences our actions, etc. It basically amounts to a defense of the first 136 pages, which in itself is convincing and compelling.

This book has implications for anyone who is interested in the mind-body relation and the body's role in cognition. Not everyone will want to read all of it, but I found that picking it up periodically and diving deeper into specific areas useful. It's not a bedtime story, so plowing through all 600 pages over a week or two might be a bit too much for someone who isn't a specialist in this area.

Lakoff has also written some interesting things on metaphor in dreams. If you have an interest in dreams, this book might be thought provoking and if so, you might also be interested in some of Lakoff's articles on interpreting dreams. If you want a nice introduction to dream interpretation that has a good article by Lakoff, consider DREAMS edited by Kelly Bulkeley. (Kelly also has a lot of other excellent books on dreaming and is quite a scholar in that area.)

I liked this book and I think it made a good dent in bringing down an outdated paradigm. I think anyone who is a cognitive therapist should read this and consider the implications. This would also be a good book for people who are more somatically-oriented therapists or who have a strong interest in mind-body medicine. I think Feldenkrais practioners and Rosen Bodyworks people would also benefit greatly from understanding this material.

Lastly, if you like this book, you might also like AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT (Feldenkrais), the EMBODIED MIND (Varela), THE ANATOMY OF CHANGE and The Body (Yuasa Yasuo). Some of these books are less mainstream than others, but they are ALL thought provoking in different ways.