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Free eBook The Passion of Michel Foucault download

by James Miller

Free eBook The Passion of Michel Foucault download ISBN: 0006380654
Author: James Miller
Publisher: Flamingo; New Ed edition (1994)
Language: English
Pages: 496
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Philosophy
Size MP3: 1902 mb
Size FLAC: 1116 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: mobi lrf rtf lrf


The Passion of Michel Foucault is a biography of the French philosopher Michel Foucault authored by the American philosopher James Miller. It was first published in the United States by Simon & Schuster in 1993.

The Passion of Michel Foucault is a biography of the French philosopher Michel Foucault authored by the American philosopher James Miller. Within the book, Miller made the claim that Foucault's experiences in the gay sadomasochism community during the time he taught at Berkeley directly influenced his political and philosophical works.

James Miller's impressively documented study of Foucault's life in philosophy is an electric, disturbing, and brilliantly provocative work, truly worthy of its subject, and essential companion to a reading of late twentieth century Western culture. Edward W. Said, author of Culture and Imperialism and Orientalism.

Harvard University Press, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 491 pages

Harvard University Press, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 491 pages. It chronicles every stage of Foucault's personal and professional odyssey, from his early interest in dreams to his final preoccupation with sexuality and the nature of personal identity.

In these chapters, James Miller's "The Passion of Michel Foucault" seemed to me more like two books than one in a certain sense. The author gives all too little information about Foucault in these pages and it is in fact quite difficult in many places to follow any sort of temporal narrative in relation to Foucault's life as one reads these chapters.

by. Miller, Jim, 1947-.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by. New York : Simon & Schuster.

Dive deep into James Miller's The Passion of Michel Foucault with a. .

Within the book, Miller made the claim that Foucault's experiences in the gay sadomasochism community during the time he taught at Berkeley directly influenced his political and philosophical works. Miller's ideas have been rebuked by certain Foucault scholars as being either simply misdirected, a sordid reading of his life and works, or as a politically. a b Scialabba, George. Boston Globe, 30 January 1993. Rubenstein, Diane 1995 Modern Fiction Studies 4. –4 681–698.

James Miller, apparently familiar with homosexuality, drugs, and sadomasochism, undertakes a project which he acknowledges Foucault would have disdained-a biography. Rigorously disciplined, Miller excellently, and commendably, correlates Foucault's ideas with the man's moment in history. Puzzlingly, Miller's approach becomes a fetish-he remains focused on the finger of the prophet, rather than seeing that Foucault unconsciously points to an answer to Nietzche's questions: how did I become what I am and why do I suffer so for it?

OF ALL THE INTELLECTUAL PROJECTS that have come to strange life in the last thirty years, and there have been many, none is more profoundly enigmatic than Michel Foucault’s.

James Miller’s Passion of Michel Foucault. OF ALL THE INTELLECTUAL PROJECTS that have come to strange life in the last thirty years, and there have been many, none is more profoundly enigmatic than Michel Foucault’s. Before his death from AIDS, in 1984, the French philosopher created a body of work fundamental to contemporary thought. His works summoned up a dream world of triumphant madness, glorious violence, and nameless moral transgressions too intense for reason to comprehend.

Yet James Miller’s ambitious new biography of the French r Michel Foucault (né Paul-Michel . In some ways, The Passion of Michel Foucault is a revival of that earlier book, done over with a French theme and plenty of black leather.

Yet James Miller’s ambitious new biography of the French r Michel Foucault (né Paul-Michel, after his father) demonstrates that the will to idolize can triumph over many obstacles. Foucault, who died of AIDS in June 1984 at the age of fifty-seven, has long been a darling of the same super-chic academic crowd that fell for deconstruction, Jacques Derrida, and other aging French imports.

User reviews
Garne
I will make this review very short. However much of Foucault we may have read over the years, one does not really know Michel Foucault unless one has read this critical, lengthy, biographical and exegetical analysis of Foucault or his ever-changing thought, much less his strange "passion," / "quest," the only constant that motivated everything he wrote or said from first to last.
Bolanim
James Miller, apparently familiar with homosexuality, drugs, and sadomasochism, undertakes a project which he acknowledges Foucault would have disdained--a biography. Rigorously disciplined, Miller excellently, and commendably, correlates Foucault's ideas with the man's moment in history. Puzzlingly, Miller's approach becomes a fetish--he remains focused on the finger of the prophet, rather than seeing that Foucault unconsciously points to an answer to Nietzche's questions: how did I become what I am and why do I suffer so for it? The Foucault that emerges from the biography clearly understood what it meant to be a commodity, cultivating himself as a work of art (with its attendant commercial value.)
Brightfury
no
Went Tyu
James Miller (born 1947) is Chair of Liberal Studies and Professor of Politics at The New School. He has written other books such as Examined Lives: From Socrates to Nietzsche,Flowers in the Dustbin: The Rise of Rock and Roll, 1947-1977, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1993 book, "This book is not a biography... rather, it is a narrative account of one man's lifelong struggle to honor Nietzsche's gnomic injunction, `to become what one is.' ... I have approached Foucault's writing as if it expressed a powerful desire to realize a certain form of life; and his life as if it embodied a sustained and partially successful effort to turn this desire into a reality... I have gathered information about various aspects of Foucault's life that have been hitherto undocumented and, therefore, largely unexamined... the crux of what is most original and challenging about Foucault's way of thinking ... is his unrelenting, deeply ambiguous and profoundly problematic preoccupation with death, which he explored not only in the exoteric form of his writing, but also, and I believe critically, in the esoteric form of sado-masochistic eroticism... To make matters worse, AIDS entered the story... The fact that my book was written ... in the shadow of a plague, makes it all too easy to discount the possibility that Foucault, in his radical approach to the body and its pleasures, was in fact a kind of visionary... I have gone ahead, and tried to tell the whole truth, as best I could."

He notes in the first chapter, "the circumstances of Foucault's death are still not entirely clear... Exactly when the doctors made their diagnosis is unknown; Foucault's death came relatively early in the epidemic, before a blood test for the presence of antibodies to the virus was widely available... by the fall of 1983, if not earlier, he had begun to worry that he might have AIDS. Still, it seems that a definite diagnosis was made only belatedly, probably at the end of 1983 or the beginning of 1984... Foucault's death put [his long-time partner] Daniel Defert in a difficult position... But now, he realized, no one---neither the doctor, nor Foucault, if he knew---had told him the truth. In private... Defert was furious. After all, his longtime lover had perhaps deceived him." (Pg. 23)

He explains, "But perhaps there was a still deeper and much darker reason for Foucault's silence... about AIDS. Over the summer of 1983, the philosopher had developed a scratchy dry cough, doubtless raising fears that he might have contracted the disorder... Defert thinks that `it is quite possible' Foucault in these months `had a real knowledge' that he was `near death.' ... within the North American gay community... efforts were underway to change sexual behaviors. In the previous months, some of Foucault's closest friends... had urged him ... to watch what he was doing. But Foucault had ignored their entreaties. Keeping a check on himself---particularly when he was in San Francisco---was not his style." (Pg. 26)

He goes on, "the possibility of what Foucault elsewhere called a `suicide-orgy' exerted an unusual fascination over him... That fall... he returned to the bathhouses of San Francisco. Accepting the new level of risk, he joined again in the orgies of torture... But why was Foucault there? If he already had the virus, as he perhaps suspected, then he might be endangering one of his partners.... [or else] he might be wagering his own life... What exactly Foucault did in San Francisco in the fall of 1983---and why---may never be known... Still, there seems little doubt that Foucault on his last visit to San Francisco was preoccupied by AIDS, and by his own possible death from it... `He took AIDS very seriously,' says Defert. `When he went to San Francisco for the last time, he took it as a "limit-experience."'" (Pg. 28-29)

In the Postscript to the book, Miller reveals, "My research began with a rumor---one that I now believe to be essentially false. One evening in the spring of 1987, an old friend ... relayed a shocking piece of gossip: knowing that he was dying of AIDS, Michel Foucault in 1983 had gone to gay bathhouses in America, and deliberately tried to infect other people with the disease." (Pg. 375) He continues, "I had become convinced that the rumor ... was false. For one thing... all my informants were straight. Furthermore, I had already gathered a great deal of evidence indicating that Foucault himself was never told that he in fact had AIDS. If this was true, then the notion that he had been some kind of `AIDS guerilla,' intent on killing others, seemed farfetched." (Pg. 380)

But after interviewing Defert [including his comment about the "limit-experience"], "Given the circumstances in San Francisco in the fall of 1983... to have taken AIDS as a `limit-experience'... would have involved engaging in potentially suicidal acts of passion with consenting partners, most of them likely to be infected already... Foucault and these men were wagering their lives together..." (Pg. 381)

In-between these quotations, lies an excellent, and very informative semi-biography of Foucault. But the "esoteric" sources Miller also consults (e.g., gay S/M periodicals) make this book---while at times shocking, and controversial---"must reading" for anyone who wants to know more about Foucault.
Zbr
James Miller (born 1947) is Chair of Liberal Studies and Professor of Politics at The New School. He has written other books such as Examined Lives: From Socrates to Nietzsche,Flowers in the Dustbin: The Rise of Rock and Roll, 1947-1977, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1993 book, "This book is not a biography... rather, it is a narrative account of one man's lifelong struggle to honor Nietzsche's gnomic injunction, `to become what one is.' ... I have approached Foucault's writing as if it expressed a powerful desire to realize a certain form of life; and his life as if it embodied a sustained and partially successful effort to turn this desire into a reality... I have gathered information about various aspects of Foucault's life that have been hitherto undocumented and, therefore, largely unexamined... the crux of what is most original and challenging about Foucault's way of thinking ... is his unrelenting, deeply ambiguous and profoundly problematic preoccupation with death, which he explored not only in the exoteric form of his writing, but also, and I believe critically, in the esoteric form of sado-masochistic eroticism... To make matters worse, AIDS entered the story... The fact that my book was written ... in the shadow of a plague, makes it all too easy to discount the possibility that Foucault, in his radical approach to the body and its pleasures, was in fact a kind of visionary... I have gone ahead, and tried to tell the whole truth, as best I could."

He notes in the first chapter, "the circumstances of Foucault's death are still not entirely clear... Exactly when the doctors made their diagnosis is unknown; Foucault's death came relatively early in the epidemic, before a blood test for the presence of antibodies to the virus was widely available... by the fall of 1983, if not earlier, he had begun to worry that he might have AIDS. Still, it seems that a definite diagnosis was made only belatedly, probably at the end of 1983 or the beginning of 1984... Foucault's death put [his long-time partner] Daniel Defert in a difficult position... But now, he realized, no one---neither the doctor, nor Foucault, if he knew---had told him the truth. In private... Defert was furious. After all, his longtime lover had perhaps deceived him." (Pg. 23)

He explains, "But perhaps there was a still deeper and much darker reason for Foucault's silence... about AIDS. Over the summer of 1983, the philosopher had developed a scratchy dry cough, doubtless raising fears that he might have contracted the disorder... Defert thinks that `it is quite possible' Foucault in these months `had a real knowledge' that he was `near death.' ... within the North American gay community... efforts were underway to change sexual behaviors. In the previous months, some of Foucault's closest friends... had urged him ... to watch what he was doing. But Foucault had ignored their entreaties. Keeping a check on himself---particularly when he was in San Francisco---was not his style." (Pg. 26)

He goes on, "the possibility of what Foucault elsewhere called a `suicide-orgy' exerted an unusual fascination over him... That fall... he returned to the bathhouses of San Francisco. Accepting the new level of risk, he joined again in the orgies of torture... But why was Foucault there? If he already had the virus, as he perhaps suspected, then he might be endangering one of his partners.... [or else] he might be wagering his own life... What exactly Foucault did in San Francisco in the fall of 1983---and why---may never be known... Still, there seems little doubt that Foucault on his last visit to San Francisco was preoccupied by AIDS, and by his own possible death from it... `He took AIDS very seriously,' says Defert. `When he went to San Francisco for the last time, he took it as a "limit-experience."'" (Pg. 28-29)

In the Postscript to the book, Miller reveals, "My research began with a rumor---one that I now believe to be essentially false. One evening in the spring of 1987, an old friend ... relayed a shocking piece of gossip: knowing that he was dying of AIDS, Michel Foucault in 1983 had gone to gay bathhouses in America, and deliberately tried to infect other people with the disease." (Pg. 375) He continues, "I had become convinced that the rumor ... was false. For one thing... all my informants were straight. Furthermore, I had already gathered a great deal of evidence indicating that Foucault himself was never told that he in fact had AIDS. If this was true, then the notion that he had been some kind of `AIDS guerilla,' intent on killing others, seemed farfetched." (Pg. 380)

But after interviewing Defert [including his comment about the "limit-experience"], "Given the circumstances in San Francisco in the fall of 1983... to have taken AIDS as a `limit-experience'... would have involved engaging in potentially suicidal acts of passion with consenting partners, most of them likely to be infected already... Foucault and these men were wagering their lives together..." (Pg. 381)

In-between these quotations, lies an excellent, and very informative semi-biography of Foucault. But the "esoteric" sources Miller also consults (e.g., gay S/M periodicals) make this book---while at times shocking, and controversial---"must reading" for anyone who wants to know more about Foucault.