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Free eBook Quantum Physics and Theology: An Unexpected Kinship download

by John Polkinghorne

Free eBook Quantum Physics and Theology: An Unexpected Kinship download ISBN: 0300121156
Author: John Polkinghorne
Publisher: Yale University Press (March 20, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 128
Category: Religion
Subcategory: Religious Studies
Size MP3: 1911 mb
Size FLAC: 1766 mb
Rating: 4.8
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Quantum Physics and Theology book. Start by marking Quantum Physics and Theology: An Unexpected Kinship as Want to Read

Quantum Physics and Theology book. Start by marking Quantum Physics and Theology: An Unexpected Kinship as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

John Charlton Polkinghorne KBE FRS (born 1930) is an English theoretical physicist . Quantum Physics & Theology: An Unexpected Kinship (SPCK 2007). ISBN 978-0-281-05767-2.

John Charlton Polkinghorne KBE FRS (born 1930) is an English theoretical physicist, theologian, and Anglican priest. Polkinghorne is the author of five books on physics and twenty-six on the relationship between science and religion; his publications include The Quantum World (1989), Quantum Physics and Theology: An Unexpected Kinship (2005), Exploring Reality: The Intertwining of Science and Religion (2007), and Questions of Truth (2009).

It is most fascinating in "Quantum Physics and Theology "to observe him demonstrate this thesis. John Polkinghorne has written many books combining ideas from his two areas of expertise: science and religion. -Miroslav Volf, Yale Divinity School. John Polkinghorne, KBE, FRS, is fellow and retired president, Queens' College, Cambridge University. In this small volume, he juxtaposes ideas from up to date quantum physics with some of the aspects of Christianity that seem baffling to many scientists. In doing so, he achieves his purpose of showing how critical realism can bridge these two seemingly opposed disciplines.

Quantum Physics and Theology. An Unexpected Kinship . When John Polkinghorne writes on the intersection of science and religion, one pays attention. -Anthony L. Blair, Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith. It is a highly readable book, appropriate for use in undergraduate courses on religion and science. The book is an important contribution to the dialogue between Christian theology and physics. -Yiftach J. H. Fehige, American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly. Sales Restrictions: For sale in North, South, and Central America exclusively.

Despite the differences of their subject matter, science and theology have a cousinly relationship, John Polkinghorne contends in his latest thought-provoking book. Despite the differences of their subject matter, science and theology have a cousinly relationship, John Polkinghorne contends in his latest thought-provoking book. From his unique perspective as both theoretical physicist and Anglican priest, Polkinghorne considers aspects of quantum physics and theology and demonstrates that the two truth-seeking enterprises are engaged in analogous rational techniques of inquiry.

128 pages, softcover. Yale University "Although the book is intended for nonspecialists, Polkinghorne's own expertise shines through in the quiet confidence with which he cites examples to back his main. Quantum Physics and Theology: An Unexpected Kinship (9780300138405) by John Polkinghorne. Although the book is intended for nonspecialists, Polkinghorne's own expertise shines through in the quiet confidence with which he cites examples to back his main theses. Quantum Physics and Theology helps to counteract the stereotype that comes up all too often in religion and science controversies: Science has to do with indubitable truths while religion is nothing more than speculation, personal opinion, or uncritical acceptance of tradition. -Robert B. Griffiths, Physics Today.

Despite the differences of their subject matter, science and theology have a cousinly relationship, John Polkinghorne c. .Books related to Quantum Physics and Theology: An Unexpected Kinship.

theology have a cousinly relationship, John Polkinghorne contends in his latest thought-provoking book

Despite the differences of their subject matter, science and theology have a cousinly relationship, John Polkinghorne contends in his latest thought-provoking book. tes that the two truth-seeking enterprises are engaged in analogous rational techniques of inquiry.

Despite the differences of their subject matter, science and theology have a cousinly relationship, John Polkinghorne contends in his latest thought-provoking book.  From his unique perspective as both theoretical physicist and Anglican priest, Polkinghorne considers aspects of quantum physics and theology and demonstrates that the two truth-seeking enterprises are engaged in analogous rational techniques of inquiry. His exploration of the deep connections between science and Christology shows with new clarity a common kinship in the search for truth. Among the many parallels he identifies are patterns of historical development in quantum physics and in Christology; wrestling with perplexities such as quantum interpretation and the problem of evil; and the drive for an overarching view in the Grand Unified Theories of physics and in Trinitarian theology. Both theology and science are propelled by a desire to understand the world through experienced reality, and Polkinghorne explains that their viewpoints are by no means mutually exclusive.
User reviews
Aiata
Quantum Physics and Theology: An Unexpected Kinship is an excellent discussion of epistemology, which is the "theory of knowledge especially with regard to its methods and validation." (Oxford Pocket American Dictionary of Current English) In this short clearly written book Polkinghorne (JP) begins by dealing with the question of truth, an issue fundamental to our understanding of the world. His discussion ranges from the modernist belief in objective truth to postmodernism which teaches that the truth of a subject varies according to the believer. Namely, that there is no universal truth. JP presents his understanding of this tension as an idea called "critical realism". Having defined his assumptions, he begins his analysis of two very different subject areas, Christian theology and Quantum theory, in their search for truth and in the similarity of their methods and problems. A quick list of the topics included in the comparison contains 1. Moments of enforced radical revision; 2. A period of unresolved confusion; 3. New synthesis and understanding; 4. Continued wrestling with unresolved problems; 5. Deeper implications. He discusses each of these areas in depth from the point of the quantum scientist which he was for 25 years and the ordained priest in the Anglican church. What I, a believing Christian and a follower of scientific knowledge, have gained from this book is the ability to refute scientific dismissal of the development of theological thought as so much wishful thinking and blind obedience.
Sorryyy
Although this is deceptively thin, it takes some time to get through it. Polkinghorne seems to assume quite a bit about the reader and that makes this a bit of a trudge at times. I'm a pastor with an interest in science and theory but I honestly got lost a few times. I appreciated his insights on the relationship between theology and quantum physics but in the end it ended up not being very helpful. Might be one of those books that you need to read a few times.
Scoreboard Bleeding
This is an excellent book for both scientists and spiritual people. It is written on an academic level, especially the sections on physics, but I think the general public will have no difficulty understanding it.
Gathris
John Polkinghorne has written many books combining ideas from his two areas of expertise: science and religion. In this small volume, he juxtaposes ideas from up to date quantum physics with some of the aspects of Christianity that seem baffling to many scientists. In doing so, he achieves his purpose of showing how critical realism can bridge these two seemingly opposed disciplines. But he also recommends a deeper study: "Perhaps this proferred hors d'oeuvre might encourage some to sit down to a more substantial meal."

With his characteristic precision, Polkinghorne sets out the difference between scientific and other types of inquiry: [the natural sciences] "enjoy possession of the secret weapon of experiment, the ability to put matters to the test, if necessary through repeated investigation of essentially the same set of impersonal circumstances. This enables science thoroughly to investigate a physical regime defined by a definite scale ... and to make an accurate map of it. ... By way of contrast, in all forms of subjective experience - whether aesthetic enjoyment, acts of moral decision, loving human relationships, or the transpersonal encounter with the sacred reality of God - events are unique and unrepeatable, and their valid interpretation depends ultimately upon a trusting acceptance rather than a testing analysis."

Polkinghorne uses a technique he calls "comparative heuristics" - basically the comparison of similarly constructed models as opposed to direct analogies. This enables the rationale to be evaluated regardless of the validity of a priori assumptions; thus Polkinghorne is able to address such a controversial topic as "miracles" without partisanship. "It does not make theological sense to suppose that God is a kind of show-off celestial conjurer, capriciously using divine power today to do something God did not think of doing yesterday and won't be bothered to do tomorrow. There must be a deep underlying consistency in divine action, but that requirement does not condemn the deity never to do anything radically new and unexpected." While miracles are the bête noir of science, the same could be said of materialist dogma to a believer; the author gently illustrates this by reference to the way that novel thinking by Maxwell, Born and Schrödinger contributed to an innovative understanding of the "potentialities present in the unpicturable quantum state associated with the electron."

I commend this book to any scientist who thinks his discipline incompatible with theology and any believer who is interested in learning how the latest developments in physics fit alongside spirituality. My only reservation is that Polkinghorne's combination of wisdom with humility is addictive - a reader will be unable to stop at this book.