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Free eBook Imagining Evil: Witchcraft Beliefs and Accusations in Contemporary Africa (Religion in Contemporary Africa Series) download

by Gerrie Ter Haar

Free eBook Imagining Evil: Witchcraft Beliefs and Accusations in Contemporary Africa (Religion in Contemporary Africa Series) download ISBN: 1592214851
Author: Gerrie Ter Haar
Publisher: Africa World Pr (January 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 298
Category: Religion
Subcategory: New Age and Spirituality
Size MP3: 1146 mb
Size FLAC: 1215 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: mbr azw doc lrf


Religion in Contemporary Africa series, vi + 348 pp.

Religion in Contemporary Africa series, vi + 348 pp. Tables.

Firstly, the fact that most of its contributors are scholars living and working in Africa brings an acuteness of observation - often based on actual lived experience rather than academic involvement alone. And second, the interest of the authors in this volume is defined not defined only by scholarly insight, but also - even primarily - by the painful knowledge of the human suffering caused by witchcraft accusations

Religion inContemporary temporary series, vi + 348 pp.

in Con ter Haar, ed. Imagining Evil: Witchcraft Beliefs and Accusations Africa. Africa World Press, 2007. Religion inContemporary temporary series, vi + 348 pp. Carousel Previous Carousel Next.

Religion in Contemporary Africa series, vi + 348 p. The bulk of the book consists of descriptions, varying in quality, of witchcraft from various parts of Africa. Her assertion that they know more of witchcraft since they have "lived experience" of it is debatable. It is startling that so few contributors are concerned with the major changes witchcraft beliefs have undergone, even in the last decades; they write almost as if present-day beliefs were merely survivals from the past.

Annie Coombes, ReInventing Africa: Museums, Material Culture and Popular Imagination, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996, £4. 0. Africa Today: Representative Cultures.

Published by Africa World Press (2006)

Imagining Evil: Witchcraft Beliefs and Accusations in Contemporary Africa (Religion in Contemporary Africa Series). ISBN 13: 9781592214853. Published by Africa World Press (2006). ISBN 10: 1592214851 ISBN 13: 9781592214853.

Witchcraft accusations against children in Africa have received increasing international attention in the first decade of the 21st century

Witchcraft accusations against children in Africa have received increasing international attention in the first decade of the 21st century. The phenomenon of witch-hunts in Sub-Saharan Africa is ancient, but the problem is reportedly "on the rise", due to charismatic preachers such as Helen Ukpabio, as well as "urbanization, poverty, conflict and fragmenting communities".

ABOUT THE AUTHOR GERRIE TER HAAR is Professor of Religion, Human Rights and Social Change at the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague

First, the fact that most of the contributors are scholars living and working in Africa brings an acuteness of observation - often based on lived experience rather than academic observation alone. ABOUT THE AUTHOR GERRIE TER HAAR is Professor of Religion, Human Rights and Social Change at the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague. She has written extensively on religion in Africa and the African diaspora in Europe.

Religions and belief systems that have captured a space close to the political power center tend to become more . Stephen Ellis and Gerne Ter Haar, Worlds of Power: Religious Thought and Political Practice in Africa (London: Hurst, 2004) p. oogle Scholar.

Religions and belief systems that have captured a space close to the political power center tend to become more sanitized and their rituals less explicit, whereas belief systems that have not been awarded official status are often more devolved and less doctrinal in addition to maintaining more explicit rituals. Magic usually falls into the latter category, even though the type of beliefs behind practices are not fundamentally dissimilar from its more organized and centralized kin in cathedrals, mosques, and temples around the world.

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