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Free eBook The Israelite Samaritan Version of the Torah: First English Translation Compared with the Masoretic Version download

by Benyamim Tsedaka,Sharon Sullivan,James H. Charlesworth,Emanuel Tov

Free eBook The Israelite Samaritan Version of the Torah: First English Translation Compared with the Masoretic Version download ISBN: 0802865194
Author: Benyamim Tsedaka,Sharon Sullivan,James H. Charlesworth,Emanuel Tov
Publisher: Eerdmans; 1St Edition edition (April 26, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 558
Category: Religion
Subcategory: Judaism
Size MP3: 1831 mb
Size FLAC: 1858 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: mbr lrf lit azw


The Israelite Samaritan Version of The Torah

The Israelite Samaritan Version of The Torah. April 2013 saw a special publishing event, when Eerdmans published the first English translation of the Israelite Samaritan Version of the Torah alongside the Masoretic version, also in English

William B. Eerdmans Publishing C. 2013. Pp. xxxvii + 522, illus.

This English translation gives a faithful rendition of the Samaritan text and, by comparing it to the Masoretic version, shows the pluriform nature of the early biblical textual tradition. A welcome addition to the biblical studies library!"

This landmark volume presents the first-ever English translation of the ancient Israelite Samaritan version .

This landmark volume presents the first-ever English translation of the ancient Israelite Samaritan version of the Pentateuch, or Torah. One of my major interests is the harmonization of texts concerning Passover observance and counting the omer.

Benyamim Tsedaka's expert English translation of the Samaritan Pentateuch is here laid out parallel to the more familiar Masoretic Text, highlighting the more than 6,000 differences between the two versions. In addition to extensive explanatory notes in the margins throughout, the book's detailed appendices show affinities between the Samaritan and Septuagint versions and between the Samaritan and Dead Sea Scroll texts. Concluding the volume is a categorical name index containing a wealth of comparative information. 10 people like this topic. Portions of bibliographic data.

Benyamim Tsedaka's expert English translation of the Samaritan Pentateuch is here laid out parallel to the more familiar . Benyamim Tsedaka; Sharon Sullivan; J L Magnes Professor of Bible Emanuel Tov. ISBN-13.

Brand new: lowest price. Product Information Translated by. Benyamin Tsedaka,Sharon Sullivan Dufour. Foreword by Emanuel Tov; foreword by Steven Fine; introduction by James H. Charlesworth. Translated by.

The first English translation of the Samaritan Pentateuch, currently . The validity of the Samaritan Torah in comparison to the Jewish Torah was debated in.

The first English translation of the Samaritan Pentateuch, currently awaiting publication, opens the door to new interpretations of problematic Biblical texts, such as Exodus 3:24ff and Numbers 12:1. The Israelite Samaritan people are one of the most ancient, continuous, indigenously living people in the Middle East, counting their ancestry back to over 125 generations.

This landmark volume presents the first-ever English translation of the ancient Israelite Samaritan version of the Pentateuch, or Torah. A text of growing interest and importance in the field of biblical studies, the Samaritan Pentateuch preserves a version of the Hebrew text distinct from the traditional Masoretic Text that underlies modern Bible translations.Benyamim Tsedaka's expert English translation of the Samaritan Pentateuch is here laid out parallel to the more familiar Masoretic Text, highlighting the more than 6,000 differences between the two versions. In addition to extensive explanatory notes in the margins throughout, the book's detailed appendices show affinities between the Samaritan and Septuagint versions and between the Samaritan and Dead Sea Scroll texts. Concluding the volume is a categorical name index containing a wealth of comparative information.
User reviews
Bu
What an amazing feat Benyamin Tsedaka has accomplished! I was very well pleased with the quality of the work done in this volume. A gift that will continue to bless for many years to come.
invincible
This is a parallel version of the Torah, in double columns on each page. The left column is the Samaritan, the right column is the Masoretic. Easy to see the differences because they are side by side, and additionally, the editors have added blanks (............) in the text of the Masoretic to show where data was either removed in the Masoretic or added in the Samaritan. A great reference for Bible study. Use alongside the Septuagint and the Dead Sea Scrolls Bible, and you have 4 textual sources to compare.
Awene
This parallel presentation of the Samaritan and Masoretic texts allows he reader to have a better understanding the differing views of these two Jewish groups. It is amazing how small differences cause great arguments. The introductory essays provide excellent guidance.
Kajikus
This is helpful in the study of the Abrahamic religions. It allows a study along side the Masoretic texts. If you are interested in religious studies you will find this will give you addition insight into the formation of biblical text.
Auau
Easy to read. Love the way the text is laid out next to the Masoretic text for comparison.
Mopimicr
Great read and runs true to the Jewish/Christian Torah but has some little extras or perspectives, and the names of the people have variations which were unexpected. Everyone who loves the Torah should read this just for a little deeper connection to Torah.
Hono
a valuable addition to me library
I find the book fascinating and enlightening. I've always known there were differences in the two versions of the Five Books of Moses, but now I can see for the first time exactly what those differences are, and understand the differences in the beliefs of the Jews—originally from the Kingdom of Judah and in exile all these centuries—and the Samaritans—originally from the northern Kingdom of Israel and still living in the land these thousands of years. I wish the book included the original Hebrew for comparison as well, but of course that would make the book so thick as to be unwieldy. There is a separate book available that compares only the Hebrew.