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Free eBook The Truth About Girls and Boys: Challenging Toxic Stereotypes About Our Children download

by Rosalind Barnett Ph.D.,Caryl Rivers

Free eBook The Truth About Girls and Boys: Challenging Toxic Stereotypes About Our Children download ISBN: 0231151624
Author: Rosalind Barnett Ph.D.,Caryl Rivers
Publisher: Columbia University Press; 17830th edition (September 27, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Proper Nutrition and Fitness
Subcategory: Psychology and Counseling
Size MP3: 1651 mb
Size FLAC: 1111 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: docx mbr lrf txt


Caryl Rivers and Rosalind C. Barnett are widely acclaimed for their analyses of women, men, and society.

Caryl Rivers and Rosalind C. In The Truth About Girls and Boys, they tackle a new, troubling trend in the theorizing of gender: that the learning styles, brain development, motivation, cognitive and spatial abilities, and "natural" inclinations of girls and boys are so fundamentally different, they Caryl Rivers and Rosalind C. This book challenges popular (but scientifically inaccurate) stereotypes about boys and girls - stereotypes that make it difficult for both boys and girls to realize their full potential. Barnett's dissection of the ways tired stereotypes are being . This book challenges popular stereotypes about boys and girls - stereotypes that make it difficult for both boys and girls to realize their full potential. Barnett's dissection of the ways tired stereotypes are being repackaged as 'science' is urgently important. It must be read immediately by parents, educators-anyone who believes children should develop their full intellectual and emotional potential. Peggy Orenstein, author of Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture.

Girls and Boys: Challenging Toxic Stereotypes About Our Children. Harm Our Relationships, Our Children, and Our Jobs, one of the best of 2004.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The Truth About Girls and Boys: Challenging Toxic Stereotypes About Our Children. by Caryl Rivers and Rosalind Barnett. Caryl Rivers and Rosalind Barnett are widely praised for their analysis of women, men, and society. Their "uncommon storytelling grace" led the Boston Globe to name their book, Same Difference: How Gender Myths Harm Our Relationships, Our Children, and Our Jobs, one of the best of 2004.

Barnett attended Queens College and received her P. Truth about girls and boys: Challenging toxic stereotypes about our children, New York, Columbia University Press. in clinical psychology from Harvard University. 1 Fellowships and honors. Barnett, R. & Rivers, C. (2004). Barnett are widely acclaimed for their analyses of women, men, and society

Caryl Rivers and Rosalind C. In The Truth About Girls and Boys, they tackle a new, troubling trend in the theorizing of gender: that the learning styles, brain development, motivation, cognitive and spatial abilities, and "natural" inclinations of girls and boys are so fundamentally different, they require unique styles of parenting and education.

Caryl Rivers and Rosalind Barnett are widely praised for their analysis of women, men .

Caryl Rivers and Rosalind Barnett are widely praised for their analysis of women, men, and society. Their uncommon storytelling grace led the Boston Globe to name their book, Same Difference: How Gender Myths Harm Our Relationships, Our Children, and Our Jobs, one of the best of 2004. Ignoring the science that challenges these claims, those who promote such theories make millions, frightening parents and educators into enforcing old stereotypes and reviving unhealthy attitudes in the classroom. Rivers and Barnett unmake the pseudoscientific rationale for this argument, stressing the individuality of each child and the uniqueness of his or her talents and desires.

Challenging Toxic Stereotypes About Our Children. Caryl Rivers and Rosalind C. Books related to The Truth About Girls and Boys. by Caryl Rivers, Rosalind Barnett,, P.

Rivers, Caryl, Barnett, Rosalind. The Truth About Girls and Boys. They recognize that in our culture, girls and boys encounter different stimuli and experiences, yet encouraging children to venture outside their comfort zones helps them realize a multifaceted character. Challenging Toxic Stereotypes About Our Children. Columbia university press. Educating parents, teachers, and general readers in the true nature of the gender game, Rivers and Barnett enable future generations to transform if not transcend the parameters of sexual difference.

In short, there are no clear or simple answers, and we should be wary of anyone who claims otherwise.

Caryl Rivers and Rosalind C. Barnett are widely acclaimed for their analyses of women, men, and society. In The Truth About Girls and Boys, they tackle a new, troubling trend in the theorizing of gender: that the learning styles, brain development, motivation, cognitive and spatial abilities, and "natural" inclinations of girls and boys are so fundamentally different, they require unique styles of parenting and education.Ignoring the science that challenges these claims, those who promote such theories make millions while frightening parents and educators into enforcing old stereotypes and reviving unhealthy attitudes in the classroom. Rivers and Barnett unmake the pseudoscientific rationale for this argument, stressing the individuality of each child and the specialness of his or her talents and desires. They recognize that in our culture, girls and boys encounter different stimuli and experiences, yet encouraging children to venture outside their comfort zones helps them realize a multifaceted character. Educating parents, teachers, and general readers in the true nature of the gender game, Rivers and Barnett enable future generations to transform if not transcend the parameters of sexual difference.
User reviews
Modar
This book is very easy to read and covers a lot of the gender stereotypes that we commonly see in society today. I thought it discussed more heavily the stereotypes placed on young girls rather than boys; it was very god at pinpointing where there is equality in the structure and function of the brain but we have just placed a gender roles on tasks like spatial reasoning or empathy. It does a good job of reinforcing that young children's brains have lots plasticity. With that being said we need to be aware of their social learning and that they are vulnerable to adopt repeatedly exposed stereotypes we commonly place on gender. I would like more application of how to create gender equality and letting children know that they don't have to fit into a mold because they are girl or boy.

-Hillary
watching to future
The book is an easy read and clearly lays out a different example of a gender stereotype per chapter (toys, play, etc). Overall, the book focuses on gender stereotypes and how they are fostered in both the education system and in general society. Two main points of the book include:
1) Providing equal opportunities for all students in schools by allowing children to develop their "7 intelligences" and choosing their own passions and preferences.
2) Encouraging parents to model behaviors that do not promote stereotypes, as children can recognize gender stereotypes as early as age 2.
The book however, seems to focus more on giving examples of stereotypes and does not provide much information as to how to make these two main points practical in everyday life.
Shadowredeemer
This book challenges popular stereotypes about boys and girls -- stereotypes that make it difficult for both boys and girls to realize their full potential. Authors take this position apart in great detail, analyzing and explaining the flaws and the limited scope of the studies claimed to support it, as well as presenting the substantial body of well-constructed studies that collectively present a much different picture, of girls and boys substantially equal in abilities and potential.
Prorahun
Love this book!
Qane
If you are interested in the study of gender differences, then this book is a good and easy read. However, reader be warned: It should be read with a critical eye. As the authors expose and explore many gender stereotypes regarding play behaviors, academic abilities, nurturing tendencies, and aggression, they present supporting research evidence, but with a clearly biased slant toward feminism. In addition, many of the citations are from small studies or singular sources that should not be too widely generalized without further study. While this book is certainly thought-provoking, be careful not to accept all that is said at face value and not to make any big decisions regarding your child's education and upbringing based solely upon the research presented here.
Yar
I originally read this book for a Developmental Class and I found it very interesting. I do not think that it was necessarily relevant for those looking to understand the "differences" or after reading the similarities between boys and girls in the early developmental stage. The book looks at various topics from toy selection, word choices, math skills, and parents to debunk many presumed truths about the differences between boys and girls. While there are multiple research studies present the authors are very general in what they say and have a feminist bias in their work. They do however make valid points that much of the research presented to the public may be skewed or bias itself and presented to show it as truth when in reality there is far more research behind it that was not mentioned. There are many important applications for parents and teachers presented in the book, especially about how parental perception affects children and how much of an impact parents have on what their children think and act. Overall this was a good book to read despite it's own gender bias and general statements.
Granirad
This is a quite good book. It talks about the gender difference between boys and girls. Some chapters in this book are contradict to what we believed before and I am glad that the author points them out. First thing I want to share after I read this book is the boys and girls are not that different as we thought before. In the first six weeks pregnancy, there is no difference between boys and girls as a embryo. Besides, based on the neuroscience technology, we know that the structure and function of the brain is similar between boys and girls. The second thing I'd like to share is we should never push too much expectation to our children. The external expectation from teachers and parents are so strong that the children would regard those expectations as their self-cognition. If a teacher say "Well, the math I gonna teach today is difficult for girls, but boys may think it is easy", the girls will have a self-implication that they cannot do as good as boys on math. Generally speaking, the girls have the physical ability to do as good as boys on math. However, the outer expectation to them limit their performance on many aspect. Things are same goes for boys. If parent say "you will never sing as our neighbor girl" to their son, then the boy would probably never dare to sing even though he might own the potential to be a singer. This book also mentions other aspect of boys and girls such as single-gender class and aggressive behavior and choice toys etc. All in all, it is worth to read, even though some of the research findings are old and not that sound.