» » The Trouble with City Planning: What New Orleans Can Teach Us

Free eBook The Trouble with City Planning: What New Orleans Can Teach Us download

by Kristina Ford

Free eBook The Trouble with City Planning: What New Orleans Can Teach Us download ISBN: 0300177429
Author: Kristina Ford
Publisher: Yale University Press (August 30, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 288
Category: Other
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Size MP3: 1752 mb
Size FLAC: 1538 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: mbr mobi lrf txt


Kristina Ford is Visiting Professor of Public Policy Leadership at the University of Mississippi

Kristina Ford is Visiting Professor of Public Policy Leadership at the University of Mississippi. In 2010–2011 she was the chief of staff to New Orleans' deputy mayor, who is responsible for all efforts to rebuild the city and to plan for its continuing development. -Witold Rybczynski, author of Last Harvest. 7 people found this helpful.

As the city’s director of planning from 1992 until 2000, Kristina Ford is uniquely placed to use these opportunities .

As the city’s director of planning from 1992 until 2000, Kristina Ford is uniquely placed to use these opportunities as a springboard for an eye-opening discussion of the intransigent problems and promising After the vast destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans faces a rare chance to rebuild, with an unprecedented opportunity to plan what gets built. Ford advances several planning innovations that, if adopted, could be crucial for restoring New Orleans, but also transformative wherever citizens are troubled by the results of their city’s plan. This keenly intelligent book is destined to become a classic for planners and citizens alike.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Trouble with City Planning : What New .

As the city's director of planning from 1992 until 2000, Kristina Ford is uniquely placed to use these opportunities as a springboard for an eye-opening discussion of the intransigent problems and promising possibilities facing city planners across the nation and beyond.

What New Orleans Can Teach Us. Kristina Ford

What New Orleans Can Teach Us. Kristina Ford. In The Trouble with City Planning, Ford argues that almost no part of our usual understanding of the phrase city planning is accurate: not our conception of the plan itself, nor our sense of what city planners do or who plans are made for or how planners determine what citizens want. Most important, our conventional understanding does not tell us how a plan affects what gets built in any city in America.

Ford was director of city planning in New Orleans for eight years before Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, bringing floods and devastation on a scale unparalleled in an American city in modern times

Ford was director of city planning in New Orleans for eight years before Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, bringing floods and devastation on a scale unparalleled in an American city in modern times. According to Ford, the hurricane was an opportunity for city planners to do their job: "to devise how to use the city's lands more to the city's betterment. But this didn't happen.

After the vast destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans faces a rare chance to rebuild, with an unprecedented opportunity to plan what gets built.

Author of The Trouble With City Planning What New Orleans Can Teach Us, Planning small town America, Remote sensing for planners, The Trouble With City . Planning small town America

Author of The Trouble With City Planning What New Orleans Can Teach Us, Planning small town America, Remote sensing for planners, The Trouble With City Planning What New Orleans Can Teach U. Planning small town America. Remote sensing for planners. City planning, Internet Archive Wishlist, Land use, Case studies, Regional planning, Remote sensing.

Kristina Ford had been the director of planning for New Orleans and her story starts after the headlines faded and the reporters left town. The trouble begins with the process of trying to create and agree on a plan for the city's reconstruction

Kristina Ford had been the director of planning for New Orleans and her story starts after the headlines faded and the reporters left town. The trouble begins with the process of trying to create and agree on a plan for the city's reconstruction. No fewer than five city plans were prepared in under three years, each a caricature of a particular style or school of planning. Story continues below advertisement. The first was the "perfect plan," true to the best traditions of the city, with well-designed new parks and boulevards.

Coauthors & Alternates.

The Trouble with City Planning: What New Orleans Can Teach Us: ISBN 9780300177428 (978-0-300-17742-8) Softcover, Yale University Press, 2011. Coauthors & Alternates.

InThe Trouble with City Planning,Ford argues that almost no part of our usual understanding of the phrase "city .

InThe Trouble with City Planning,Ford argues that almost no part of our usual understanding of the phrase "city planning" is accurate: not our conception of the plan itself, nor our sense of what city planners do or who plans are made for or how planners determine what citizens want.

After the vast destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans faces a rare chance to rebuild, with an unprecedented opportunity to plan what gets built. As the city’s director of planning from 1992 until 2000, Kristina Ford is uniquely placed to use these opportunities as a springboard for an eye-opening discussion of the intransigent problems and promising possibilities facing city planners across the nation and beyond.

In The Trouble with City Planning, Ford argues that almost no part of our usual understanding of the phrase “city planning” is accurate: not our conception of the plan itself, nor our sense of what city planners do or who plans are made for or how planners determine what citizens want. Most important, our conventional understanding does not tell us how a plan affects what gets built in any city in America. Ford advances several planning innovations that, if adopted, could be crucial for restoring New Orleans, but also transformative wherever citizens are troubled by the results of their city’s plan. This keenly intelligent book is destined to become a classic for planners and citizens alike.

User reviews
Thetalas
great book.
Qutalan
Kristina nails many of the issues confronting city planning today--especially the issues of how the public and policy makers interact with city plans, the challenges in public involvement, and the reality of how plans need to be used. I found the prescriptions good, but could be expanded to be more helpful.
Mysterious Wrench
After the vast destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans faces a rare chance to rebuild, with an unprecedented opportunity to plan what gets built. As the city's director of planning from 1992 until 2000, Kristina Ford is uniquely placed to use these opportunities as a springboard for an eye-opening discussion of the intransigent problems and promising possibilities facing city planners across the nation and beyond.

In The Trouble with City Planning, Ford argues that almost no part of our usual understanding of the phrase "city planning" is accurate: not our conception of the plan itself, nor our sense of what city planners do or who plans are made for or how planners determine what citizens want. Most important, our conventional understanding does not tell us how a plan affects what gets built in any city in America.

Ford advances several planning innovations that, if adopted, could be crucial for restoring New Orleans, but also transformative wherever citizens are troubled by the results of their city's plan. This keenly intelligent book is destined to become a classic for planners and citizens alike.

Kristina Ford is one of America's best known urban planners and writers on planning. In the immediate aftermath of Katrina, Ford's thoughtful assessments--heard on CNN, the BBC, and National Public Radio--became the first public voice of reason to mediate the great storm's human and civic consequences. Her highly regarded study, Planning Small Town America, is used as a text in many graduate urban planning programs. She lives in New Orleans.
"A thoughtful, engaging, and cautionary account of the interaction of professional planners, politicians, developers, and citizens in contemporary American cities. The message that planning can and must do better with respect to daily decision making, as well as big and recalcitrant but now urgent problems, and that informed citizens are crucial to this, is timely and important."--Alan Plattus, Yale University

"Kristina Ford makes sense out of the misguided planning efforts that have bedevilled post-Katrina New Orleans, and provides valuable suggestions for how our cities should be planned in the future--more democratically and more effectively."--Witold Rybczynski, author of Last Harvest.
Kagaramar
The stated purpose of this book is to take the experience of New Orleans, especially as intensified by the need to rebuild after Hurricane Katrina, as a way of examining the strengths and weaknesses of city planning in the United States. As a former director of planning for New Orleans, the author definitely has, as the book industry likes to put it, a platform, and my initial impression of the author's writing style was that she could have made it as a novelist. Slowly, almost imperceptibly, however, the book melts down into a forgettable muddle.

As I worked my way through the book, I thought I was beginning to detect a tension classic in books on urban affairs: the author is highly experienced with one or a handful of cities but to make the book saleable, they have to make conclusions about all cities. I could just see the author submitting a manuscript on New Orleans but the editor coming back and asking for it to be broader in scope: the book has rich descriptions of planning in the Big Easy, including a scathing portrait of consultants descending upon the city in the wake of Katrina, smelling the stench of contract money in the air. Then inserted around these descriptions are more general points that weren't quite connected and feel like they might have been written later. At this point, the author had my sympathy and I dismissed these problems as just coming with the territory of urban affairs books: the issues weren't enough to keep this from being a good book, only a great one.

But then the muddling started. A lot of it has to do with this ambiguous dance that the author attempts. On one hand, she comes across as defensive of the planning profession for being misunderstood. On the other hand, while she lauds the profession, almost arrogantly, she is also critical of it. As a result, the book does this three-step between the misunderstanding public, the current profession and a possible better future for the field.

One quote, describing her reaction to one of the dozen people who attended a meeting in the Lower Ninth gives a good sense of this. This woman wondered out loud why they were bothering to discuss where to put a grocery store that would never get built and in response, the author said:

>Of course we did [know that planning for a grocery story in a poor neighborhood was a theoretical exercise because the potential profits would be so low], but I chose to answer her question with professional dogma about how a planner goes about discovering what a diverse citizenry considers a mutually agreeable vision of their city's future--what I have previously called a prerequisite for a good plan. A grocery story only seemed unlikely _now_, I said; but a planner's duty is to plan for what citizens want when the city's economy improves. . . . I explained that if we designated on a plan where citizens wanted a grocery store, a developer intent on building one could be steered to that location. . . . I understood from the perplexed look on her face that this woman was unconvinced [no kidding], though she nodded at my answer and politely let the subject drop....

It's hard to know what to make of this, especially as her use of the word `dogma' and her admission that her audience didn't buy what she said both suggest a critical stance toward her own response to the question. Yet later, she seems to be defending the approach she took at that meeting.

Furthermore, at this stage of the game, the book repeatedly says that non-planners misunderstand plans. She describes what she considers a fallacy to be -- often something that I know planners themselves believe -- but then doesn't follow through with a description of how things actually work. This gets progressively more confusing until the book starts to become redundant enough that it's possible to put together the pieces.

A major thrust of her critique is that non-planners believe plans are predictions and guides to the future, that they will channel and direct future growth patterns. In this view, deviations are seen as violations of the plan. The author's view, however, is that the future is unknown and many unforeseen good things will come down the pike. City plans are then not expected to be literal guides to development but rather guides to how to respond to development. A fair point but the journey getting there was rough.

Another major point is that planning is opaque, which diminishes its power: decision-makers will turn elsewhere for guidance if they don't grasp plans. Furthermore, the lack of transparency disconnects planning from the vast knowledge ordinary people have about the impacts of land uses on their lives. If clarity is what's needed, however, this book doesn't bode well for the future.

The book ends with the author advocating what she calls Good City Plans (with capital letters). This is her sense of how the process of writing plans could be done better. Some of her suggestions are good ones, but I was mainly left with the impression that they were extremely modest, that the author is so committed to plans that she's looking for a way of making them useful instead of really getting at what's the trouble with planning.

I did, however, get a little out of this book, mainly a history of the bungled replanning New Orleans and a sense of another possible relationship between planning departments, planning commissions and elected officials than what I've seen personally. Also, the book accurately describes a number of day-to-day dynamics of planning and is in this sense very quotable.