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Free eBook Life Like Dolls: The Collector Doll Phenomenon and the Lives of the Women Who Love Them download

by A. F. Robertson

Free eBook Life Like Dolls: The Collector Doll Phenomenon and the Lives of the Women Who Love Them download ISBN: 0415944503
Author: A. F. Robertson
Publisher: Routledge (October 22, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 288
Category: Other
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Size MP3: 1174 mb
Size FLAC: 1287 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: azw lrf lit azw


By turns insightful, probing, provocative, and thoughtful, "Life Like Dolls explores the richly metaphoric meaning of dolls and the inner lives of the people who collect them.

By turns insightful, probing, provocative, and thoughtful, "Life Like Dolls explores the richly metaphoric meaning of dolls and the inner lives of the people who collect them.

Life Like Dolls book. Exploring the nexus of emotions, consumption and commodification they represent, A. F. Robertson tracks the rise of the porcelain collectible market; interviews the women themselves; and visits their clubs, fairs and homes to understand what makes the dolls so irresistible. Lifelike but freakish; novelties that profess to be antiques; pricey kitsch: These dolls are the product of powerful emotions and big business.

While the women who collect these dolls gaze at them in rapture, the rest of us may only glimpse them from the corner o. lived, and how you view your own past and future.

While the women who collect these dolls gaze at them in rapture, the rest of us may only glimpse them from the corner of. i. In this strange phenomenon of the collector doll, some aspects of the way women have grown during the course of the twentieth century have been fixed in porcelain. If we can read the features of these dolls with sufficiently open minds, they may tell us something interesting about our collective history, and perhaps also something significant about our constitution as human beings.

The analysis was conducted via discourse analysis to interpret the results from the perspective of symbolism in consumption.

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F. Robertson is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of seven books including Greed and Beyond the Family. Country of Publication.

oceedings{Robertson2004LifeLD, title {Life Like Dolls: The .

oceedings{Robertson2004LifeLD, title {Life Like Dolls: The Collector Doll Phenomenon and the Lives of the Women Who Love Them}, author {Alex F. Robertson}, year {2004} }. Alex F. Robertson. Table of Contents Preface Acknowledgments 1. Introduction 2. The Commodity 3. The Collection just Grows and Grows 4. The Doll that Needs You 5. Dollification 6. More than Real 7. Forever Young 8. Innocence and Fear Appendices Bibliography. View PDF. Save to Library.

Life Like Dolls pursues why middle-class, educated women obsessively . Robertson shows how the doll serves to encapsulate everything from guilty pleasure and longing to big business and consumer.

Life Like Dolls pursues why middle-class, educated women obsessively collect these dolls and what this phenomenon says about our culture. Robertson shows how the doll serves to encapsulate everything from guilty pleasure and longing to big business and consumer commodification. A work of originality and verve.

The Molecules of Life. Living in a Microbial World. By turns insightful, probing, provocative, and thoughtful, Life Like Dolls explores the richly metaphoric meaning of dolls and the inner lives of the people who collect them. Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience this may cause.

Since the 1980s there has been a growing billion dollar business producing porcelain collectible dolls. Avertised in Sunday newspapers and mailbox fliers, even Marie Osmond, an avid collector herself, is now promoting her own line of dolls on the Home Shopping Network and sales are soaring. With average price tags of $100 -- and $500 or more for a handcrafted or limited edition doll -- these dolls strike a chord in the hearts of middle-aged and older women, their core buyers, some of whom create "nurseries" devoted to collections that number in the hundreds.Each doll has its own name, identity and "adoption certificate," like Shawna, "who has just learned to stack blocks all by herself," and Bobby, whose "brown, handset eyes shine with mischief and little-boy plans." Exploring the nexus of emotions, consumption and commodification they represent, A. F. Robertson tracks the rise of the porcelain collectible market; interviews the women themselves; and visits their clubs, fairs and homes to understand what makes the dolls so irresistible.Lifelike but freakish; novelties that profess to be antiques; pricey kitsch: These dolls are the product of powerful emotions and big business. Life Like Dolls pursues why middle-class, educated women obsessively collect these dolls and what this phenomenon says about our culture.
User reviews
Kerdana
As a doll collector myself, I had good motivation to buy and read this book. The area of focus, however, is on baby, or child like dolls, and I have little interest in these. As it was published in 2004, I was expecting more about fashion and icon dolls, but there was almost nothing. The author also concentrated his efforts on what he referred to as PCDs, meaning porcelain doll collectors. There are many other mediums available and currently in use in the manufacture of collector dolls, which makes them more durable and more versatile, but this was barely mentioned.
It seemed like this book was written by someone or persons who had no personal appreciation of doll collecting, and the material seems dated. I would have liked to see pictures and interviews with collectors, maybe even a chapter on designers.
The author made vague illusions to fear of dolls, but otherwise, the information within the book was informative, and did seem accurate, albeit, somewhat dated.
Ytli
Only talked about porcelain dolls. Title misleading!!!!!
Super P
Doll collecting is a fun, enjoyable, innocent, creative, and time-honored hobby. This book tries its best to take all the fun out of it, and, taking a superior and patronizing tone, to psychoanalyze doll collectors, of which I am one. I would also have rated this book 0 stars, if possible. I didn't finish it and I got rid of it. AVOID this book, doll lovers of all ages!!
Felhalar
Just for Dr. Robertson, this review is gonna ramble...
This is the kind of book that makes serious anthropologists cringe. This is the kind of book that makes the "hard science" scientists make jokes about social "scientists." I appreciate Dr. Robertson's attempt to appeal to the largest possible readership in order to sell the book, but, unfortunately, wandering around in the middle just made the book tedious, repetitive, rambling, poorly presented, and way too generalized. Instead of scientific conclusions (or even, methods) Dr. R. makes huge sweeping generalizations about what his little computer-generated statistics tell him! I was embarrassed for him. I understand that students were major contributors, so maybe I should keep that in mind. Congratulations, you can all say you are "published" contributors on your resumes now, through the kindness of Dr. Robertson. But, leaving the students out of it, Dr. Robertson often wandered off the subject (Porcelain Collector Dolls) into other areas and kinds of doll collecting, sometimes seeming to imply that other kinds of doll collecting are just as weird and demented as PCD collecting. Maybe so, but other kinds of doll collecting should have waited for another book, instead of muddying the water in this volume, generalizing, summarizing, pontificating, and just making the book an exasperating trial to read. That said, I do think the subject is a fascinating one, and I think the manufacturers would be even more fun to study! When I first started working in antique and vintage doll repair, my first response to the PCD's I saw in doll magazines was the same one Dr. Robertson most often encountered outside of the PCD collecting "world:" Eeeee-ee-eew; nauseating; weird! Who could be collecting these dolls? Well, now I know who they are, and that could have been summarized in an essay. After checking out some of those dolls at doll shows, I began to think about their usefulness in the Los Angeles area carpool lanes. Hmmm...might be worth the investment, but would I be strangely compelled to keep buying them?? Have a trunk full? More in carseats in the back? I doubt it. I don't exactly fit the "profile," and don't collect PCD's, although I am the "right" age and I do have a few other kinds of dolls lying around the house. I've never felt the "empty nest" syndrome (who first made that up, anyway?) -- I was thrilled when I finally had more time and a spare room to use for my avocation repairing dolls. I also think it's telling to note that the most often quoted sources in the book are both very out of date; why Dr. R. used studies from 1896 (Hall and Ellis) and Freud, who isn't even in the bibliography, and who no one takes seriously anymore anyway, is really beyond me. I was mildly entertained by Dr. Robertson's discussion of "hyperreality," but it was just one among many concepts he was handing out as scientific fact. It's fine to hypothesize and speculate, but he forgot to tell us that the WHOLE BOOK is a hypothesis with a lot of speculation thrown in! This is what my mathematician husband calls "telling stories!" God help anyone who believes this information hook, line, and sinker! The frequency charts in the appendix were really disappointing and will go over the heads of most readers; why didn't he just use bar graphs? Chapter 8 was the best, most organized, and most interesting section in the book; I wish I'd read it first and saved myself a lot of time.
fabscf
This book occupies a strange position between popular nonfiction and academic writing: It's a well-researched, careful study of porcelain collectors' dolls and the women who collect them, but it's written in a way that is very personal and immediate. It caused me to look at my own collecting behaviors in a new way. The conclusion could reach further, but otherwise I found the entire book surprisingly fascinating. If you're interested in anthropological research, women's studies, consumerism, toys, dolls, human evolution, geriatrics, family studies, or art, then consider this book. It will start you thinking, and you'll never flip past the doll ads in magazines again without taking a close look.
HyderCraft
this was a horrible book first of all i just turned 14 and i have been collecting porcelin dolls since i was 5 years old and this idiot is trying to say that doll collectors have mental problems...this book really distured and upset me when i read it lkast year and it made every one who know that i collect dolls think that i have pervesed tendencies if i could give it 0 stars i most certainly would
Contancia
Good grief -- the title alone is reason enough to pass this one up. By the way, men collect dolls (and I don't mean action figures) too.

100% trashy psychobabble with no substance.